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13 Simple Memory Tricks To Help You Remember Anything Easily

13 Simple Memory Tricks To Help You Remember Anything Easily

In the age of Google and Wikipedia, it’s easy to dismiss an impressive memory as a useless skill. But sometimes, you won’t have access to the internet. Sometimes, like at an interview or when you’re giving a speech, reading aloud can give a terrible impression.

So, until the time where your speeches are programmed into a chip in your brain, a good memory can be a huge advantage. Here are 13 simple memory tricks to improve your memory:

1. Clench Your Right Hand When Learning, Then Your Left Hand to Remember

As weird as it might seem, a study actually proved this effective in improving short-term memory.[1] When you’re learning, simply clench your right hand into a fist. And then later on, when you have a need to remember, squeeze your left hand.

However, this is only proven to be effective in right-handed individuals. Though they did the same test for left-handed people, those results are reserved for a different study, so stay tuned.

Or simply try it for yourself and see if you experience any significant difference.

2. Coordinate Smells

Smells have been proven to trigger memories better than sound,[2] but any direct application of that fact can be quite tricky.

One idea is to coordinate smells from when you’re memorizing something to when it needs to be remembered. For example, try spraying perfume of a very particular odor on the back of your hand when you’re reading, and then again the same the day of your test, or speech or presentation.

3. Coordinate Positions

If you maintain the same position when you’re trying to remember as you did when you memorized, it is likely that your memories will be easier to reach.[3] While the study focused on autobiographical memories, it should be applicable to more practical situations as well.

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Try studying in one position—for example with your legs crossed at a certain angle—and then remember to answer the test or do the interview in the same position.

4. Chew Gum

There are two theories in place for why this is. One is that chewing leads to increased blood flow to the area, and therefore enables more brain activity.[4] The other is much the same as our previous tricks: that chewing gum becomes associated with the memory and it gets easier to access if chewing gum while recalling it.[5]

Regardless of which you believe, it might be a good idea to pick up a pack of gum before your next big exam. And just in case taste has the same effect as smell, stick with the same flavor for the test as you use when studying.

5. Use the Power of Melody

It’s almost mysterious how much easier it is to remember lyrics than recite the words of a tuneless essay. And this is not something we’re just imagining either. Studies have proven the efficacy of melody when it comes to learning.[6]

While it might seem like a ton of extra work, you can simply piggyback off melodies you already know and love. Perhaps the best are famous classics because they don’t have lyrics that could perhaps be distracting when trying to memorize.

Just make sure you don’t burst into song when you’re remembering!

6. Don’t Do “All-Nighters”

Not only does sleeping improve your memory,[7] mass repetition is suggested to decrease even immediate memorability, not increase it.[8]

It is also proven that distributed practice, where you study for short periods of time spread out over a longer period, works better than massed practice, i.e cramming.[9] So don’t do all nighters. Remember to get your hours of sleep after a day of studying.

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And of course, it’s a great idea to study something a little at a time, a few minutes each day. When you’re learning a language, flash cards or good language learning apps are very convenient for that purpose.

7. Meditate

As it turns out, Buddhists have been on to something in the belief that meditation is a path to enlightenment. In a study, meditating four times per day for 20 minutes increased cognition from 15% to as much as 50%.[10]

So, if you’ve ever wondered about meditation, start doing it. Check out this quick and simple guide to meditation: The 5-minute Guide to Meditation: Anywhere, Anytime

8. Exercise More

If you find some of the other suggestions to be tedious and you would appreciate a more physical approach, you’re in luck. There has been established a clear connection between regular exercise and improved cognitive functions, including memory.[11]

So exercising more wouldn’t only make you healthier, it could also improve your memory.

If you think you’re too busy to exercise, here’re 5 Ways to Find Time for Exercise.

9. Drink Less

Long-term abuse of alcohol has been proven to have severe effects on memory.[12] And while I’m by no means accusing you of being an alcoholic, I think many of us could stand to drink a little less.

And when you add in the time you lose while drunk, I’m pretty sure we can all agree that excess drinking is not the best approach to memorizing anything.

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10. Associate

Tricks that improve memory all seem to boil down to one thing: association.

Up until now, we have mostly dealt with involuntary association, such as remembering better when smelling the same smell, or sitting in the same position. But now it’s time for voluntary association.

There are some areas where this is rather simple:

For example, in language learning, a trick to remember new vocabulary is to associate the new word with a word it sounds like that you already know.[13] If you’ve ever noticed how much easier it is to remember a new word that sounds exactly the same as another one, then you know what I’m talking about.

Sometimes, you have to stretch the pronunciation a bit, like with the Japanese word kensaku, which I choose to remember via “Ken sucks.” In my own experience, the more far-fetched and ridiculous the association, the easier it is to remember. (Kensaku 検索 means search, by the way.)

And then there is visual association with new words, something that has become much simpler with many newer textbooks helping with the implementation of visual techniques, perhaps especially so with the Chinese alphabet with the “Heisig” method being fairly well known and appreciated in language learning communities.[14]

The Heisig method uses visual association to help you remember the shape of the hanzi or kanji, for Chinese and Japanese respectively. Some of my friends found it extremely helpful, and others found it lackluster.

11. Bundle Memories Together

Make use of pattern recognition[15] and bundle together a lot of memories into one.

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The simplest aspect of this is perhaps when remembering numbers. This is called the “chunking technique.”[16] If you can bundle them together in a meaningful way that means something to you, it can make remembering strings of numbers a whole lot easier.

In Norway, we bundle phone number digits together in pairs, so you could, for example, think of them as years. (Our phone numbers are 8 digits long.) So, a phone number could be 45 80 90 18. You could therefore use 1945, being the year WWII ended, associate 80 with the ’80s, and 90 the ’90s, then 1918 is the year WWI ended.

12. Write It Out

Maybe it’s the added repetition, or maybe it’s the fact that writing activates completely different areas of the brain and you somehow store the information in more than one place; either way, writing something down makes it easier to remember.[17]

So, if there’s something that’s absolutely vital that you don’t forget, write it out by hand. Better yet, make an actual physical note and bring it with you.

That way if your cellphone malfunctions, or the sound is accidentally turned off, you are more likely to remember in spite of circumstances.

13. Talk to Yourself

You don’t have to do long dramatic monologues with a mirror as the only spectator. Simply say whatever you want to remember out loud. A study showed that it improved memory accuracy by up to 10%.[18] So maybe it’s a habit best practiced in solitude.

Bottom Line

While some of these are tricks, others are about developing and improving your general cognitive abilities. Needless to say, the latter will complement the former, so remember to take care of yourself and your brain if you want to improve memory.

As for the tricks themselves, a combination of many of the tricks are likely to provide the best results, as recreating a complete setting might just be the best way to recollect something.

More About Boosting Memory

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Department of Psychology, Montclair State University: Getting a Grip on Memory: Unilateral Hand Clenching Alters Episodic Recall
[2] Telegraph: Smell and memory: the power of scent
[3] Cognition. 2007 Jan: Body posture facilitates retrieval of autobiographical memories.
[4] New Scientist: Chewing gum improves memory
[5] Nutr Neurosci: Effects of chewing gum on mood, learning, memory and performance of an intelligence test.
[6] Orla C. Hayes: The Use of Melodic and Rhythmic Mnemonics To Improve Memory and Recall in Elementary Students in the Content Areas
[7] Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: Study Shows How Sleep Improves Memory
[8] Psychon Bull Rev (2011): More is not always better: paradoxical effects of repetition on semantic accessibility
[9] Psychological Bulletin: Distributed Practice in Verbal Recall Tasks: A Review and Quantitative Synthesis
[10] PsyBlog: Cognition Accelerated by Just 4 x 20 Minutes Meditation
[11] The Guardian: Start running and watch your brain grow, say scientists
[12] VerWellMind: How Heavy Alcohol Use Can Damage Memory Function
[13] University of Leicester: The effect of the integrated keyword method on vocabulary retention and motivation
[14] Wikipedia: Heisig
[15] The Atlantic: Using Pattern Recognition to Enhance Memory and Creativity
[16] Lifehacker: Improve Your Memory with The Chunking Technique
[17] The University of Stavanger: Better learning through handwriting
[18] PsyBlog: Memory Improved By Saying Words Aloud

More by this author

Ragnar Miljeteig

Ragnar is a passionate writer who blogs about personal development at Lifehack.

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Last Updated on December 4, 2020

10 Best Task List Apps to Boost Productivity in 2020

10 Best Task List Apps to Boost Productivity in 2020

Organizational drag is anything that eats up time and keeps people from getting things done in time. Companies that wish to boost productivity do so by creating more efficient processes.

This also applies to individuals, freelancers, and entrepreneurs. Whether you work alone or as part of a team, it is important to use the right tools to boost productivity, and having an accessible and easily manageable task list can go a long way.

Here is a list of the top ten productivity apps that you can use to achieve more.

1. ToDoist

    ToDoist is an awesome to-do task list app that is used by over 10 million people. To use the app, you just have to write down all the activities that you plan to do. The software will then interpret these activities and categorize the tasks accordingly.

    For instance, if you create a task to go for lunch at noon with a friend, the app will automatically categorize this task as a meeting and will send you a reminder at the right time.

    However, this app is more than a personal activity planner. You can use it to plan activities for the entire team. It is also good for planning entire projects, discussing details about the project, and monitoring the deadlines.

    The basic functionality is free, but you can unlock premium features for $36 or $60 a year for full access.

    Available on iOS and Android

    2. monday.com

      This productivity app lets you manage your workflows and tasks. It is a great tool for creating a task list and helping you have a clear view of your work and the status of each task.

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      The app is a bit similar to a spreadsheet. However, it looks much nicer, and it allows you to toggle between multiple views. It gives you alerts and notifications, and it allows you to attach files as well as communicate with colleagues.

      The features of Monday.com include a task board that can be customized to manage due date, hours spent, task status, and much more. Users can upload and attach files, make comments, mention members of their team, and more. It can also be integrated into Google Drive, Slack, GitHub, Jira, Dropbox, and many other platforms.

      If you have problems setting it up, you can contact the customer via email or phone.

      Available on iOS and Android

      3. CloudApp

        CloudApp is a great app for boosting productivity. It offers highly intuitive communication, which can help you save up to 56 hours a week. Your only problem will be deciding how you can utilize all the extra time.

        Whether you are talking with a customer, colleague, or client, this app has all the features you need. With GIFs, screenshots, and image annotation, you no longer have to write lengthy emails. Instead, you can show people what you want them to do.

        The app has over 3 million users. It has proven quite reliable when it comes to helping users to boost productivity. You can opt for the free version or you can opt for a $9 a month upgrade to access premium features.

        Available on iOS

        4. Quip

          If you are working closely with members of your team, Quip is a great app for team activities. The platform combines spreadsheets, documents, slides, and chat. Its main strength is that it comes with a suite of Live Apps. You can use them to increase the functionality of Quip.

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          Moreover, you will waste less time by being able to streamline the use of various tools. Quip is one of the most adaptable productivity apps in the world.

          There are options to use connected tools to track time, manage work, and much more. Some of the integrations of Quip are Dropbox, Github, Slack, Salesforce, and much more. The app costs just $30 a month for 5 users.

          Available on iOS and Android

          5. Trello

            Trello is an app that makes managing projects an easy task. This is made possible by the app’s Kanban philosophy. It is a visual and intuitive platform.

            Users can break huge tasks into small chunks, making it useful for creating a task list. This is made possible by creating cards for each task. The cards can be organized into different columns, which are representative of various stages of the project. Once a task is complete, a card is moved from one column to the next.

            The app is free but it comes with a premium plan with $9.99 a month.

            Available on iOS and Android

            6. Focus Keeper

              This app is perfect for those who wish to improve their work habits and minimize distractions while maintaining focus on current tasks. Focus Keeper is based on the Pomodoro technique. This method utilizes timeboxing to ensure each task is complete.

              This is more than a task list app. If you wish to understand how you work best, the app delivers a suite of tools that you can use to set up your workday. It tracks your hours, analyzes, checks interruptions, and much more. Some of the integrations of Focus Keeper are Trello, Asana, Todoist, Basecamp, Outlook, Google Keep, and many others.

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              The app costs $2.99 a month for those who wish to access premium features. It is accessible on Linux, iOS, Android, web, macOS, and Windows.

              Available on iOS and Android

              7. Quire

                This app is designed as a professional and personal to-do task list manager. The app has a very efficient and optimized design due to the developers’ philosophy on visual task management. It allows you to easily get updates and work with your teammates.

                The app also allows users to customize and choose templates based on their preferences. It is easy to use, but it helps you get things done. The app is currently free.

                Available on iOS and Android

                8. Asana

                  This Kanban-style app is quite popular. It helps you visually organize your tasks. With this app, you can set deadlines, tasks, assignees, and visualize your workflow. It is quite popular and used by many people.

                  The app features a sleek clutter-free design and comes with several integrations. As a result, it can be adapted to a wide range of projects. The app costs $9.99 a month.

                  Available on iOS and Android

                  9. Toggl

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                    You can use this simple time tracker to help boost your team’s productivity. It works on different devices across several platforms, and it comes with numerous friendly reminders to ensure that you remember to keep it on. It usually sends you a report once you complete a task to help you make improvements next time.

                    The app is free and those who wish to access premium features pay $9 a month.

                    Available on iOS and Android

                    10. Omni Focus

                      This app is considered the gold standard of the to-do apps. Omni Focus delivers a huge number of features that can be used to sort, prioritize, and plan tasks. It features several ways to categorize tasks such as location, energy needed, and priority.

                      It is only available on Apple devices and it costs $39.99 for the standard package.

                      Available on iOS

                      Summary

                      All the apps above are great for boosting productivity. However, you will need to pick one that best suits your needs. Try a number of them out before you decide to settle on one.

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                      Featured photo credit: Bram Naus via unsplash.com

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