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10 Things People With Effective Communication Skills Have In Common

10 Things People With Effective Communication Skills Have In Common

Whether you’re ordering pizza delivery or dialing 911 for emergency care, effective communication can carry you through all aspects of life. It’s important, it’s essential and it’s not too hard to master.

While some excellent communication skills are inherent, those not naturally gifted with these traits can certainly practice to perfection.

As entrepreneur Brian Tracy said, “Communication is a skill that you can learn. It’s like riding a bicycle or typing. If you’re willing to work at it, you can rapidly improve the quality of every part of your life.”

In order to be the best communicator that you can be, look at the list below. The 10 following attributes belong to true communication experts:

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1. They Listen

“We have two ears and one mouth and we should use them proportionally,” says Susan Cain author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking.

Excellent listening is an essential skill in effective communicating. Being able to absorb what others say allows one to come up with appropriate responses. Great communicators don’t create one-sided conversations, because what’s the point of that?

They never try to think of responses as others are still speaking, because they don’t want to risk losing track of what is being said. By holding on to every word in the conversation, good communicators know just what fits when it comes time to speak.

2. They Can Relate to Others

As they listen intently, people with effective communication skills gain an understanding of their audience. Be it a room full of people, a group of online subscribers or just one other person, they can tailor their message for the specific listeners at hand.

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It’s absolutely necessary to have some insight regarding your crowd, because without that understanding, your words will fall flat. You wouldn’t want to praise burgers and pork chops to a group of PETA members while trying to win them over, would you? The understanding is beneficial for all members of the dialogue, as the messages are clear and all parties feel understood.

3. They Simplify the Complex

Some messages can be complicated, confusing or absolutely muddled. The good communicator, though, can take these messages and make them clear and concrete for his audience. Think of a teacher describing a new concept to an algebra class – if he can’t make the complicated understandable, his lesson will never get across to the students. By breaking down or rephrasing content, great communicators make the message more digestible to more people.

4. They Know When to Speak Up

Understanding when dialogue is required will always be helpful in good communication. Say, for example, an employee at work is slacking off or failing to understand a concept. A boss that recognizes the need for a conversation will be much better off than a boss that wordlessly sweeps the issue under the rug. They know when to speak up, and when it will do them good versus the instances in which it’s best to be quiet.

5. They Are Available

Whenever you need the excellent communicator, they make themselves available. They give you answers and don’t leave you hanging. They’re not the boyfriend that disappears and doesn’t text back for hours on end; they’re not the boss that has no time to explain assignments. Good communicators lead complete discussions, with which all parties are satisfied.

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6. They Practice Confidence

A good communicator knows she is a good communicator. She doesn’t hide behind vague language and she speaks loud and clear. Her air of confidence earns the trust of the audience, as she demonstrates that she knows what she’s talking about.

7. They Are Specific

If you’re going to get your message across, you’re not going to beat around the bush. Good communicators have a clear, concise point and there is no mistaking just what that is. She’ll give detailed instructions or ask targeted questions – she’ll leave no room for confusion.

Why, asks the communicator, would she waste time trying to sugarcoat her message with vague language? She’d much rather share it in a straightforward manner and avoid confusing the listener.

8. They Focus on Their Interactions

A big part of communicating well and respectfully is eliminating distractions from interactions. No one likes to be mid-conversation to have the other party start texting or shoving food in its face. By ridding his environment of these things, the good communicator is focused solely on the message and audience.

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9. They Ask Questions

Again, in an effort to best understand the audience, a good communicator uses questions – ones that are filled with specifics – amply. They fill any gaps of confusions with answers, not assumptions. Any knowledge gained through questioning helps to better fulfill the audience as well as to better get the communicator’s message across.

10. They Recognize Non-Verbal Cues

When chatting face-to-face, body language can be just as important as the words being spoken. Recognizing frustration, nervousness or excitement via non-verbal signals – like posture, facial expression and eye contact – helps the great communicator to understand her audience. In turn, she can better tailor her message to match the attitude of said audience.

Practicing these skills and improving your ability to communicate is worth your time and effort. As successful businessman Paul J. Meyer said, “Communication – the human connection – is the key to personal and career success.”

Featured photo credit: Anna Levinzon via flickr.com

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Kayla Matthews

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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