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Published on February 16, 2021

The 6 Aspects of Life You Need To Start Maximizing

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The 6 Aspects of Life You Need To Start Maximizing

Do you struggle to find happiness and success in all areas of your life?

Perhaps your career has taken over your relationships or your health has stopped you enjoying your favourite hobbies?

Either way, when we lose balance in life, that’s a sign that we need to look again at our priorities and find a holistic way of living. A way that considers our mental and physical health, our career, our finances, our relationships and our spiritual wellness.

That’s what you’ll learn in this article.

A new way of living, enjoying and succeeding.

Understand Your Life

There are 6 aspects of life that you need to be aware of.

I’ll explain each of the 6 aspects in a moment, but first, I’d like you to spend a few minutes completing our Life Assessment to find out how balanced (or unbalanced!) your life is right now.

The Life Assessment will help you understand your life better. It will also provide you with a detailed custom report for FREE based on your strengths — enabling you to discover how to live your life to the fullest.

The Life Assessment will only take you around 5 minutes to complete; and those 5 minutes could be the catalyst for a new and exciting life. So please go ahead and complete the assessment now.

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Once you’ve finished the assessment — and spent some time looking at the results — you’ll be ready to discover…

The 6 Life Aspects

I came across these aspects early in my career after I burnt myself out through continually pushing myself — until my mind and body gave me clear signals to stop!

After my mental and physical health had been severely compromised, I lost the energy and motivation to keep going with my career. This also led to a decline in my self-confidence and a drop in my productivity and creativity.

However, it wasn’t all bad news. I was able to use the downtime as a wake-up call. I realized that anything taken to the extreme is unsustainable and that a happy, healthy and successful life only comes when all parts of our lives are in harmony and balance.

This was the impetus for creating the 6 Life Aspects — aspects that need to be balanced and fulfilled in order for us to function naturally and optimally.

I’ll talk now about each of the Life Aspects, plus I’ll give hints and tips on how to maximize each area — including how to benefit from core skills that I’ve termed ‘Life Multipliers’.

1. Physical Health

Imagine having tons of drive and energy and being able to consistently achieve your aims and desires.

This can be a reality if you spend small but regular periods of time in developing and maintaining your physical health.

You can do this through making simple changes to your life, such as improving your diet, exercising more and practicing meditation.

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These activities could lead to BIG gains in your physical and mental health. And critically, your health improvements will also inevitably lead to gains in ALL areas of your life.

Life Multiplier: Develop renewable vitality. Through eating, exercising and sleeping well, you’ll be able to keep your energy levels at a maximum.

2. Family and Relationship Fulfillment

When you have happy and healthy relationships with friends, family and colleagues, you’ll also have the necessary foundations for overall success and well-being in your life.

Harmonious relationships are so important that I recommend you limit the amount of time you spend with negative people and increase the time you spend with creative, enthusiastic, and supportive people. By doing this, you’ll keep yourself in tune with success.

Of course, I’m not suggesting you cut yourself off completely from any of your negative friends or family members — but you’ll certainly benefit by reducing the amount of time you spend with them.

Life Multiplier: Learn how to master your emotions. This will enable you to get along with almost everyone. It also means that you won’t be pushed around by life’s ever-changing circumstances.

3. Work and Career Prosperity

For most people, their career is one of their top priorities. And this makes sense, as on average we spend around 1,800 hours per year working.[1] Work is also the main source of income for the majority of people.

It’s definitely a positive thing to focus on progressing your career. This will give you something to aim for, and ties in with research that shows that striving towards goals makes people happier.[2]

Life Multiplier: Learn the art of self-control. You can do this by building positive new habits that will support your goals and aspirations.

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4. Wealth and Money Satisfaction

You’ve probably heard that money is the root of all evil. However, this is inaccurate. The full Bible quotation is “the love of money is the root of all evil.”

It’s normal and natural to want to have sufficient money to pay for you and your family’s needs — including mortgages, cars and holidays.

However, don’t put your focus on money, instead, put your focus on offering a service or product to the world. If it’s something that people need and want, then you should charge fairly for it and enjoy the rewards.

Life Multiplier: Be self-empowered. With this quality operating in your life you’ll have the confidence to be a high earner; you’ll also have the confidence to spend money on necessities and luxuries. (We all need a treat from time to time!)

5. Spiritual Wellness

While I’m predominantly a logical person, I don’t believe that every decision and action has to be based on facts and figures. Sometimes we need to follow our intuition and our heart.

Whether you believe there is a power greater than us or not, spiritual practices such as meditation, breathing exercises and singing can help us to tap into a world beyond logic.

It’s also worth noting that research shows that people who believe in a higher power tend to be happier and more satisfied with life than those that don’t.[3]

Life Multiplier: Discover conscious communications. This means being able to tune into others as well as tuning into a higher perspective.

6. Mental Strength

I find it easy to spot someone with a weak mind: They have no focus, no discipline, and they lack conviction and drive.

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On the other hand, I also find it easy to spot someone with a strong mind: They are dynamic, purposeful and engaging. They also quickly impress as someone who can ‘get things done’.

Life Multiplier: Learn the art of smart focus. This will enable you to get things done in the most effective and efficient manner. When you have the power of smart focus working in your life, you’ll have the necessary time and energy to develop your mental strength.

My recommendation is that you take some time to study and think about the 6 Life Aspects. Look for areas that you should limit and areas that you should expand.

Once you’ve successfully balanced the 6 Life Aspects — you’ll be working and living smarter than ever before. You’ll also develop an unstoppable forward momentum that will take you where you want to go in life.

A New Life Awaits You

So now you have the keys to living a full and holistic life.

You just need to take action and begin balancing the 6 Life Aspects. You can do this by implementing the suggested Life Multipliers.

I’m excited to have shared the information in this article with you, as I know that it can transform all aspects of your life for the better and help you achieve your goals and dreams.

American professional snowboarder Gretchen Bleiler sums up this approach well:

“I learned a few years ago that balance is the key to a happy and successful life, and a huge part of achieving that balance is to instill rituals into your everyday life — a nutritious balanced diet, daily exercise, time for yourself through meditation, reading, journaling, yoga, daily reflection, and setting goals.”

Featured photo credit: Masaaki Komori via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Leon Ho

Founder & CEO of Lifehack

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Last Updated on October 7, 2021

How to Make a Change With the Four Quadrants of Change

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How to Make a Change With the Four Quadrants of Change

Quitting smoking is the easiest thing in the world. Some people quit smoking a thousand times in their lives! Everyone knows someone with this mindset.

But this type of change is superficial. It doesn’t last. For real, lasting change to take place, we need to consider the quadrants of change.

Real change, the change that is fundamental, consistent, and longitudinal (lasting over time) has to happen in four quadrants of your life.

It doesn’t have to be quitting smoking; it can be any habit you want to break — drinking, biting your nails, overeating, playing video games, shopping, and more.

Most experts focus on only one area of change, some focus on two areas, but almost none focus on all four quadrants of change. That’s why much of change management fails.

Whether it is in the personal life of a single individual through actions and habits, or in a corporate environment, regarding the way they conduct their business, current change management strategies are lacking.

It all stems from ignoring at least one part of the equation.

So, today, we will cover all four quadrants of change and learn the formula for how to change fundamentally and never go back to your “old self.”

A word of warning: this is simple to do, but it’s not easy. Anyone who tells you that change is easy is either trying to sell you something, or they have no idea what they’re talking about.

Those who want an overnight solution have left the article now, so that leaves you, me, and the real process of change.

The Four Quadrants of Change

There are four areas, or quadrants, in which you need to make a change in order for it to stick. If you miss or ignore a single one of these, your change won’t stick, and you will go back to your previous behavior.

The four quadrants are:

  1. Internal individual – mindset
  2. External individual – behavior
  3. Internal collective – culture/support system
  4. External collective – laws, rules, regulations, teams, systems, states

All four of these quadrants of change may sound like they could carry change all by themselves, but they can’t. So, be sure to implement your change in all four quadrants. Otherwise, it will all be in vain.

First Quadrant — Internal Individual

This quadrant focuses on the internal world of an individual, and it concerns itself with the mindset of a person.

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Our actions stem from our thoughts (most of the time), and if we change our mindset toward something, we will begin to process of changing the way we act.

People who use the law of attraction fall into this category, where they’ve recognized the strength of thoughts and how they make us change ourselves.

Even Lao Tzu had a great saying regarding this:

“Watch your thoughts. They become words. Watch your words. They become deeds. Watch your deeds. They become habits. Watch your habits. They become character. Character is everything.” [1]

One of the most impactful ways you can make a change in this quadrant is to implement what James Clear calls identity-based habits. [2]

Instead of prioritizing the outcome of a change (ex.: I want to lose 20 pounds), you prioritize your identity as a person (I want to become/remain a healthy person).

Here are a couple of examples for you to see the strength of this kind of resolution:

I want to watch many movies = I am a cinema lover
I want to clean my apartment = I am a clean person
I want to harvest my crops = I am a harvester (farmer)
I want to swim = I am a swimmer

This quadrant is about changing the identity you attach to a certain action. Once you re-frame your thinking in this way, you will have completed the first of the quadrants of change.

Second Quadrant — External Individual

This quadrant focuses on the external world of an individual and concerns itself with the behavior of a person.

This is where people like Darren Hardy, the author of the Compound Effect reside. Hardy is about doing small, consistent actions that will create change in the long run (the compound effect).

You want to lose 30 pounds? Start by eating just 150 calories (approximately two slices of bread) less a day, and in two and a half years, you will have lost 30 pounds.

The same rules apply to business, investing, sports, and multiple other areas. Small, consistent actions can create big changes.

This works — I’ve read 20 extra pages a day for the past two years, and it accumulated into 90 books read in two years. [3]

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Here, you have two ways of dealing with change behaviorally: negative environmental design and positive environmental design.

Negative Environmental Design

This is when you eliminate the things from your environment that revert you to the old behavior. If you want to stop eating ice cream, you don’t keep it in your freezer.

If you want to stop watching TV, you remove the batteries from the remote and put them on the other side of the house (it works!).

Positive Environmental Design

This is when you put the things that you want to do withing reach — literally!

You want to learn how to play guitar? Put your guitar right next to your sofa. You want to head to the gym? Put the gym clothes in a backpack and put it on top of your shoes.

You want to read more books? Have a book on your nightstand, your kitchen table, and on the sofa.

You can even combine this last trick with my early advice about removing the batteries from your remote control, combining the negative and positive environmental designs for maximum effect.

Two Sides of the Same Coin

If you just change your behavior and leave your intentions (thoughts) intact, your discipline will fail you and the real change won’t happen.

You will simply revert back to the previous behavior because you haven’t changed the fundamental root of why this problem occurs in the first place.

That is why you need to create change both in the first quadrant (internal individual — mindset) and the second quadrant (external individual — behavior). These quadrants of change are two sides of the same coin.

Most change management would stop here, and that’s why most change management fails.

No matter how much you focus on yourself, there are things that affect our lives that are happening outside of us. That is the focus of the two remaining quadrants.

Third Quadrant — Internal Collective

This quadrant focuses on the internal world of the collective where the individual resides, and it concerns itself with the culture of that collective.

There are two different distinctions here: the Inner Ring and the Outer Ring.

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The Inner Ring

These are your friends and your family. The Inner Ring is the place where the social and cultural norms of your friends and family rule.

So, if everyone in your family is overweight and every lunch is 1,000 calories per person, then you can say goodbye to your idea of becoming healthy.

In this case, the culture of your group, the inner norms that guide the decisions, actions, thoughts, ideas, and patterns of behaviors are all focused on eating as much as possible. [4]

You need to have the support of your Inner Ring if you want to achieve change. If you don’t have this support, the the best way to proceed is by either changing your entire Inner Ring or distancing yourself from it.

Beware — most Inner Rings won’t accept the fact that you want to change and will undermine you on many occasions — some out of habit, some due to jealousy, and some because supporting you would mean that they have to change, too.

You don’t have to cut ties with people, but you can consciously decide to spend less time with them.

The Outer Ring

The Outer Ring consists of the culture of your company, community, county, region, and country. For example, it’s quite hard to be an open-minded person in North Nigeria, no matter how you, your friends, and your family think.

The Outer Ring is the reason why young people move to the places that share their value systems instead of staying in their current city, county, or country.

Sometimes, you need to change your Outer Ring as well because its culture is preventing you from changing.

I see this every single day in my country, where the culture can be so toxic that it doesn’t matter how great of a job you have or how great your life currently looks — the culture will change you, inch by inch, until you become like it.

Fourth Quadrant — External Collective

This quadrant focuses on the external world of the collective where the individual resides, and it concerns itself with the systems, teams, laws, and rules of that collective.

This quadrant is about the external manifestations of the collective culture. If the majority of the environment thinks in a certain way, they will create institutions that will implement that way of thinking.

The same rules apply to companies.

One example for companies would be those managers who think that employees are lazy, lack responsibility, and need constant supervision (or what is called Theory X in management).

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Then, those managers implement systems that reflect that kind of culture– no flexible work hours, strict rules about logging work, no remote work, etc.

Your thoughts, however, may be different. You might believe that people want responsibility, that they are capable of self-direction, that they can make good decisions, and that managers don’t need to stand on their necks if they want something done (this is called Theory Y in management).

Then, you would want to have flexible working hours, different ways of measuring your productivity (for example, not time on the job but work produced), and remote work, if possible for your profession.

This is when you enter into a conflict with the external collective quadrant. Here, you have four options: leave, persevere, neglect, and voice.

Leave

You can simply leave the company/organization/community/country and go to a different place. Most people decide to do this.

Persevere

This is when you see that the situation isn’t good, but you decide to stick at it and wait for the perfect time (or position) where you can implement change.

Neglect

This is where you give up on the change you want to see and just go with the flow, doing the minimal work necessary to keep the status quo.

These are the people who are disengaged at work and are doing just the bare minimum necessary (which, in the U.S. is around 65% of the workforce).

I did this only once, and it’s probably the only thing I regret doing in my life.

Voice

This is where you actively work on changing the situation, and the people in charge know that you want to create a change.

It doesn’t matter if it’s your company, community, or your country; you are actively calling for a change and will not stop until it’s implemented.

Putting It All Together

When you take it all into account, change is simple, in theory, but it isn’t easy to execute. It takes work in all four quadrants:

  1. Internal individual — mindset
  2. External individual — behavior
  3. Internal collective — culture/support system
  4. External collective — laws, rules, regulations, teams, systems, states

Some will require more work, some less, but you will need to create a change in all four of them.

But don’t let that discourage you because change is possible, and many people have done this. The best time to start changing was yesterday, but the second best time is today.

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Featured photo credit: Djim Loic via unsplash.com

Reference

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