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If You Want to Be Successful at Work, Polish Your Communication Skills First

If You Want to Be Successful at Work, Polish Your Communication Skills First

Most of us spend the majority of our day communicating with people at work, but we rarely stop and think about whether or not we’re actually good at communication.

With any other skill, you’d be constantly looking for ways to grow and develop.

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So why not communication?

It’s been shown that businesses with effective communication are 50% more likely to have lower employee turnover [1]. Good communication skills also make work more enjoyable, reduce the risk of projects going wrong, and reduce workplace conflicts.

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It takes hard work and dedication to learn to communicate well. Start with the essential workplace communication skills below. We’ll talk about

  • How to manage conflict
  • How to listen better
  • How to deal with cultural differences
  • How to receive criticism
  • How to give helpful feedback

How to manage conflict

Managing conflict at work is all about staying calm, listening carefully to everyone’s point of view, and being as understanding as possible [2]. Next time you’re hit with a difficult conflict at work, try the following steps:

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  • Stay calm. If possible, take a short break from the conflict and do something relaxing/fun, like meditating, reading or taking a short walk. You’ll be better able to deal with the issue when you’re not angry or annoyed.
  • Listen. Give everyone involved in the conflict a chance to state their case. Use active listening techniques, like repeating part of what somebody says back to them, to show that you’re fully engaged.
  • Be understanding. Show that you can empathise with your coworkers. Instead of saying, “Why wasn’t the report finished on time?”, say something like, “I understand that you’ve had a lot on your plate and might be struggling.”
  • Never make it personal. Instead of saying, “You’re always late to meetings!”, say, “It’s really important that we start the meeting on time.”
  • Find a solution together. By getting everyone involved in working out a solution, nobody will feel they’ve been treated unfairly. Once the issue is worked out, do something positive together, like having a coffee or watching a funny video. It’s always best to end on a positive note.

How to listen better

Active listening in the workplace is really important. Try the following techniques to ensure you don’t appear bored or disinterested when talking to others [3].

  • Make eye contact and smile. Staring off into space is a big no-no.
  • Check your posture. Face towards the person you’re speaking to, maybe leaning forward slightly or turning your head to one side.
  • Ask questions. This shows that you’re actively engaged and thinking deeply about what’s being said to you.
  • Repeat or summarize information. This reassures the listener that you’re paying attention and understanding fully.

How to deal with cultural differences

Having a diverse range of employees can be really good for a company, but can also cause issues. You might find that members of the team have different ideas about what’s acceptable and what’s not. Head off any potential problems by keeping communication open, emphasising the positives of having a team made up of so many unique individuals, and catering to the cultural needs of every employee.

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How to receive criticism

Receiving criticism can be really tough, especially when you’ve worked hard on a project. Make the process easier by following these steps.

  • Remember that it’s nothing personal. Even the most successful people make mistakes, and this is how we grow and improve.
  • Focus on constructive criticism. If you receive a comment that doesn’t help you to improve, ignore it. Focus on criticism that actually helps you.
  • Make a plan. Break down what you need to do to improve into small, simple steps. That might mean rewriting the report one section at a time, taking a course to improve your skills, or asking for more support at work.

How to give helpful feedback

Giving feedback sometimes feels as hard as receiving it – nobody wants to hurt a coworkers feelings. When giving feedback be clear and concise – get to the point, rather than skirting around the issue. Make comments with the intention of helping your coworker, rather than insulting them. Instead of saying, “Your formatting is all wrong,” say, “This would look even better with the correct formatting.” Avoiding words like ‘you’ makes your coworker feel less attacked.

Good communication skills are essential regardless of where you work. Start learning now and you’ll be in for a much easier and more enjoyable career.

Reference

More by this author

Eloise Best

Eloise is an everyday health expert and runs My Vegan Supermarket, a vegan blog and database of supermarket products.

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Last Updated on January 25, 2021

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

6 Reasons Why Perfectionism Kills Your Productivity

Perfectionism sounds like a first world problem, but it stifles creative minds. Having a great idea but doubting your ability to execute it can leave you afraid to just complete and publish it. Some of the most successful inventors failed, but they kept going in pursuit of perfection. On the other end of the spectrum, perfectionism can hinder people when they spend too much time seeking recognition, gathering awards and wasting time patting themselves on the back. Whatever your art, go make good art and don’t spend time worrying that your idea isn’t perfect enough and certainly don’t waste time coming up with a new idea because you’re still congratulating yourself for the last one.

1. Remember, perfection is subjective.

If you’re worried about achieving perfectionism with any single project so much that you find yourself afraid to just finish it, then you aren’t being productive. Take a hard look at your work, edit and revise, then send it our into the world. If the reviews aren’t the greatest, learn from the feedback so you can improve next time.

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2. Procrastination masquerades itself as perfectionism.

People who procrastinate aren’t always lazy or trying to get out of doing something. Many who procrastinate do so because perfectionism is killing their productivity, telling them that if they wait a better idea will come to them.

3. Recognize actions that waste time.

Artists and all creative people need time to incubate; those ideas will only grow when properly watered, but if you’re not engaging in an activity that will help foster creativity, you might just be wasting time. Remember to do everything with purpose, even relaxing.

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4. Don’t discriminate against your worth.

No one is actually perfect. We often have tremendous ideas or write things that move people emotionally, but no one attains that final state of being perfect. So, don’t get down if your second idea isn’t as good as your first—or vice versa. Perfectionists tend to be the toughest critics of their work, so don’t criticize yourself. You are not your work no matter how good or how bad.

5. Stress races your heart and freezes your innovation.

Stress is a cyclic killer that perfectionists know well because that same system that engages and causes your palms to sweat over a great idea is the same system that kicks in and worries you that you’re not good enough. Perfectionism means striving for that ultimate level, and stress can propel you forward excitedly or leave you shaking in fear of the next step.

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6. Meeting deadlines beats waiting for perfect work.

Don’t let your fear of failure prevent you from meeting your deadline. Perfection is subjective and if you’re wasting time or procrastinating, you should just finish the job and learn from any mistakes. Being productive means completing work. You shouldn’t try for months or even years to perfect one project when you can produce projects that improve over time.

Featured photo credit: morguefile via mrg.bz

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