Advertising

Last Updated on November 9, 2021

18 Quick And Effective Ways To Focus on Work Easily

Advertising
18 Quick And Effective Ways To Focus on Work Easily

You’re bent on finishing the work at hand, and suddenly something comes up. You don’t give thought to how pressing any distraction is — you just give it attention. Five minutes, ten minutes., and even an hour sometimes… When you get back to work — boom — you’ve no idea where you left off or why you couldn’t get your mind and heart into it…

Ring a bell to you? You’re not alone.

When you can’t stay focused at work and are become less productive, your valuable time and effort is gone forever. And there goes your momentum and peak of creativity.

Word of caution – there is no “quick or easy” fix on how to focus at work. The key is to be very strategic in your approach and to be prepared to experience some discomfort.

If you can’t, your work hours will slip away towards activities that Cal Newport, a renowned author and computer science professor at Georgetown University, refers to as ‘shallow work’:

“Non-cognitively demanding, logistical-style tasks, often performed while distracted. These efforts tend to not create new value in the world and are easy to replicate.”

This is the type of work that fills most of our days.

A more efficient and ultimately productive way to spend our work hours is by practicing what Newport calls ‘deep work’:

“Professional activity performed in a state of distraction-free concentration that pushes your cognitive capabilities to their limit. These efforts create new value, improve your skill, and are hard to replicate.”

Why Is It So Hard to Focus at Work?

If your ability to focus at work is suffering, it can hamper your professional life in a lot of ways. Not only can this lead to mistakes, but it can also stop you from moving up the corporate ladder.

Before you find out ways on how to focus at work, you have to know what’s causing your inability to concentrate in the first place.

Is it something minor, or are you struggling with a mental health condition? We’ve rounded up the most common reasons why people can’t focus at work below:

  • Boredom
  • Unhealthy or stressful lifestyle
  • Poor self-care
  • Insomnia (prioritize sleeping for at least 8 hours a night)
  • ADHD
  • Depression and anxiety
  • PTSD and emotional shock
  • Addiction

There are tons of reasons why your focus is running low, so don’t worry if you can’t exactly pinpoint what’s causing your lack of concentration on any task at hand.

The truth is, everyone experiences bad days. So unless you’re an airplane pilot and your task for the day isn’t life or death, take a break for a few minutes and use this time to refocus your brain.

Because there’s no chance of shutting out the world while you’re busy, the decision to stay focused at work is in your hands. It’s about finding the right techniques, knowing your priorities, and sticking to them.

How To Focus at Work Easily?

You are not the only one struggling to improve your concentration at work. Thankfully, there are many tips you can follow to improve your focus and increase your attention span while working.

Here are 18 ways on how to focus at work:

Advertising

1. Know Your Triggers

To consistently stay focused for long periods, the first step is to look deep into yourself to find out why you’re resisting focus in the first place.

We are all different in some way or another. Some of us can have a desk filled with work material and still be able to concentrate but get thrown off by a co-worker just entering our space.

The likelihood of being distracted is directly related to the amount of pull something is having on our attention. So, increased self-observation and deep introspection will help you to identify boundary cues.

There are three typical cues that you need to either set boundaries for or you are letting your boundaries slip:

  1. Discomfort
  2. Resentment
  3. Guilt

You can’t always avoid every single distraction. But if you’re aware of your weaknesses, the better the chances of putting the right systems in place to greatly reduce exposure to distractions.

Set Boundaries

A boundary is a limit defining you in a relationship with someone or something. Boundaries can be physical, digital, emotional, and even spiritual.

Learning how to set boundaries is essential in limiting disruptions and distractions in your life. Healthy boundaries give you the room to do what you want to focus on. It serves as the framework to focus your efforts and harness your energy enabling you to do your best work.

The first step in setting boundaries is knowing your triggers and limits – are they mental, emotional, physical, or spiritual?

Keep in mind that your limits are your own, so it’s likely to be different than the limits of others.

Stand Firm

Imagine the ridicule you’ll receive for placing a “Do not interrupt” sign on your office door or your desk in this ultra-sensitive era. It will likely not be received favorably by your colleagues.

Most of us are just too much of a crowd-pleaser to become conveniently reclusive and risk getting rebuked for it.

Often, our inability to set boundaries results from our fear of offending those around us. But frankly, you have little to no obligation beyond your own guilt to be immediately available to everyone all the time.

2. Eliminate Digital Distractions

We mentioned earlier how much of a distracting force digital devices have become.

If you’re like most workers, you don’t spend all of your hours at work doing actual work. Be honest. And even if you do, you’re the envy of many reading this article.

Cyberloafing is so rampant in workplaces that it costs US businesses up to US$85 billion a year, according to a University of Nevada study.[1]

To overcome this, Newport suggests staying away from distracting websites and apps for a predetermined amount of time.

“Schedule in advance when you’ll use the Internet, and then avoid it altogether outside these times.”

Here are several strategies to help with your digital de-clutter:

  • Use site-blocking apps to access the internet at set intervals.
  • Develop the willpower to not check your phone every 10 minutes. Get used to selecting the ‘do not disturb’ mode on your smartphone or keep it face down.
  • Minimize Your Notifications – Ignore the Noise
  • Unapologetically screen your phone calls – set boundaries to accept only very important calls during work hours.

3. Make Your Computer Distraction-Free

This is very important for people who always work on their computers. Put in just one folder all files related to each project or task. Then ensure your computer is always virus-free to saved you the hassle of checks and repairs. Instances such as these cause stress and will wane your interest to finish the tasks.

4. Methodically Schedule Each Day

Meticulously planning each day is the best way to approach deep work and one of the best strategies on how to stay focused at work. It imposes time limits, creating a healthy ‘pressure of time’.

One of the main reasons why most people lose focus during a workday is because of a lack of a structured plan or schedule.

Newport acknowledges that not every day will go exactly as planned. But recommends that you “schedule every minute of your day” regardless.

The time-blocking  (also known as time boxing) approach will hold you accountable by allocating specific periods for specific types of work. Dividing your workday into blocks and assigning activities to each one allows you to prioritize what’s most important.

There are different time-boxing methods such as Day-theming. Day-theming is dedicating each day of the week to a specific theme instead of switching between different types of work or areas of responsibility throughout the day. This strategy is not about scheduling a perfect day. It’s really about giving structure to your workday by forcing you to be more intentional with your time.

When you schedule each workday you’ll be more control of time because you’ll know exactly what you want to accomplish and when.

5. Make a Daily “To-Do” List and Keep It Nearby

It’s always helpful when you have your list of tasks beside your computer, at any conspicuous place in the work area, or in an accessible app. Here you can learn The Right Way to Make a To Do List and Get Things Done.

Cross out the “done” tasks when you’ve completed them, and you will have a sense of accomplishment and feel satisfied.

6. Prioritize Tasks

The first hour at work is where most people are productive. This is because all energies are yet to be spent. So To Be More Productive, Never Do This To Start Your Morning.

One of the ultimate tips in how to focus at work is to put the taxing and difficult task on your agenda during the first hour. Follow these with the less pressing work, and then end with those routine tasks that you find boring.

Such methods makes you stay focused at work, without spending precious time on doing tasks you don’t like. Do this and you won’t be stressed with important projects at the end of the workday.

7. Let Others Know of Your Strict Personal Policies

If you’re bent on making your personal working system work, let others know it. Chances are, you’d be left alone on the hours where you’re focused on the really big, important work.

When people at work know you’re on your “free time”, they will pose questions and talk during such periods. Unless there’s a very urgent matter at hand, they’ll leave you at work. After all, they want the same.

8. Be Unreachable, Busy, Away…Or “Invisible”

Not all calls are about your apartment being burglarized, or a loved one being in precarious situation. So turn off your mobile phone to silent mode during hours where you really need all attention on your work. You can also opt to activate the voicemail service.

As for instant messaging, set the status to indicate you’re “busy” or stay “invisible” while you work so you can remain focused on a task. If you still get IMs, then just turn the notification or program off. Turn it on later when your current task isn’t as pressing.

Advertising

9. Stay Away from the Social Media

These sites aren’t meant to be checked all the time. So discipline yourself to log in only when you have extra minutes free.

There’s a strong tendency that you’ll stay much longer than planned because something new, interesting and perky always comes with most social networking sites. Not only will it defeat your purpose of staying focused at work, but there’s plenty of information there that could get your mind unnecessarily perturbed — like a friend’s status about her heartbreak, or someone from work getting a raise.

10. Organize Your Emails

Another really stressful and distracting activity is email. Depending on which company you work for and your specific role, there’s a strong possibility you’ll receive a steady stream of company emails daily.

Let’s face it: You get a lot. Likely a heavy mix of personal and work correspondence, promos and updates from your sites, and undoubtedly, spam.

Emails are one of the most inescapable aspects of work life. We’re currently sending approximately 200 billion emails per day.[2]

One good way to avoid this is to have a separate email address for work and one for your personal email. Have them both powered to filter all emails. Once you have free time on hand, check emails again and unsubscribe from senders who you could live without. Then, organize the emails you’d attend to later. Delete the rest.

Newport argues that emails take up mind space and attention that could be devoted to deep work. He believes that email is the:

“Quintessential shallow activity is particularly insidious in its grip on most knowledge workers’ attention.”

Those little virtual envelopes spark such feelings of curiosity and excitement, it’s quite difficult to loosen its powerful grip on our attention.

Newport recommends several strategies:

Guard Your Email Address

  • Don’t list your email address publicly or have it on your website if you’re a business owner.
  • Have different emails or separate contact forms for different queries.
  • Have a process-centric approach. Reduce some of the back-and-forths of emails by sending more thorough and complete correspondence. This will close the loop on a conversation more quickly.
  • Prioritize the emails you receive. Understand that not every email you receive requires a response.

The Inbox Zero Method

Another email strategy you could apply is the polarizing Inbox Zero method.

Originally coined by Merlin Mann, owner of 43 Folders, Inbox Zero will help you to dedicate specific chunks of time to reading and answering emails so that they don’t take over your day.

Here are some tenants of Mann’s original view of Inbox Zero:

  • Keep your email application closed for the majority of the day.
  • When processing emails follow the principle of Delete, Delegate, Respond, Defer or Do.
  • Respond immediately to messages which can be answered in two minutes or less.

11. Redesign Your Phone Use

Phones are meant for important concerns, chats about the previous night’s date are meant for long lunch breaks. Observing such rule would help you stay focused at work.

You could also request your workmates to inform your callers you’d get back to them at a later time instead of always tapping your back or shouting out that you’ve got a call at any time.

Once you’re done with work, call back the earlier callers and explain your situation briefly. In the next two minutes, ask about their concern, note it down and tell them you’d call them back for their needed action. Prepare and write all their needed details, bearing in mind their possible follow-up thoughts on the matter. Then, call them back and always limit the phone conversation to less than three minutes.

12. Put on the Headphones

In most offices, there are various sources of sounds that can prove distracting — like the floor polisher, the mail cart, workmates talking, phones ringing, and sounds of things dropped on the floor. So why not block out distracting stuff?

Advertising

Protect yourself with headphones so you can stay focused at work. The headphones will ward off surprising sounds — and those that get your mind wandering.

13. Choose Suitable Music

The point of having music in the background while you’re working is to provide ease and inspiration so you can stay focused at work. For some, listening to music pumps up their adrenaline so they can work with greater energy.

But not all kinds of music are pleasant for everyone — and some are not suited for one’s mood. This tip in how to focus at work recommends organizing your music library accordingly.

Apart from helping you stay focused at work, no distractions should take place. There’s nothing more jarring than suddenly hearing loud, heavy metal screaming after some relaxing jazz music.

If you want some ideas for the kind of music to listen to, check out this Productivity Music for Focus (Recommended Playlists).

14. Always Find the Fun in What You Do

Any meaningful task or routine takes a large part of one’s focus. Before starting anything, ask yourself why you should do it. With your answer, there will be that output you so desire — and so you value the task.

Then, find ways for the task to become fun, like allowing your creativity and imagination to play in the process. Don’t stick within borders of “approved” output; have your options opened for new, fun ideas.

When you make something you can call your own, you’re more likely to stay focused at work.

15. Choose a Great Chair-And-Table Combo

Many people find working physically strenuous even if it’s done seated most of the time.

One of the best tips in how to focus at work is to not lose precious time and be distracted with discomfort. Get a really good chair with great back support; make sure your desk or worktable is well-structured as well. That way you can work for many hours and not find your body and eyes getting strained.

16. Get Your Work Station Organized

Too much stuff within arms’ reach or atop your desk can prove to be really distracting. To stay focused at work, only have the things you need neatly piled on your desk — put the rest away properly, like in a desk drawer or shelves. Have an area for food and drinks, your bag or purse, and other personal items. But have them within reach so you can just grab a drink without losing focus on what you’re doing.

Take a look at these 15 Best Organizing Tips For Office Organization and Getting More Done for inspiration.

17. Have Enough Water Nearby

Drinking water isn’t only healthy, it refreshes you as well. Once you feel the first sign of fatigue or hunger, a glass of water can push them away. Then you can finish what you’re doing and rest at a later time.

Besides, not all stomach rumblings are signs of hunger, and drinking a glass of water usually deals with it.

Just make sure you have water within arms’ reach. That way you stay focused at work instead of walking to the water station — and becoming prey to distractions!

18. Bring in the Healthy Snacks

Like having water close by, the food that could settle a grumbling stomach must always be at hand. For the same reason of having 90% of your attention at work, eating within your workspace area will not expose you to unrelated activities.

Also, make sure your snacks within arms reach are healthy so you can stay energetic: 25 Healthy Snacks for Work: Decrease Hunger and Increase Productivity 

Advertising

The Bottom Line

Just remember — you are surrounded by events and people at work that could cut off your momentum and affect your ability to concentrate. You can help keep these at bay with the above 18 effective ways to focus at work.

Featured photo credit: ROOM via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] University of Nevada: Email Statistics Report
[2] Sara Radicati, Ph: Email Statistics Report

More by this author

Arina Nikitina

The author of "Real Goal Getting guide" and she is on a mission to help people achieve goals, and keep focused and motivated.

18 Quick And Effective Ways To Focus on Work Easily One of the Best Goal Setting Exercises 21 Counter-Intuitive Brain Break Ideas to Boost Your Productivity 11 Things Overachievers Do Differently How to Turn Yourself Into A Powerful Leader

Trending in Focus

1 How to Become Indistractable: 4 Powerful Tactics to Help You Focus 2 How to Plan Your Day for a Healthy And Productive Life 3 How To Create A Daily Schedule To Organize Your Day 4 How to Create a To-Do List That Super Boosts Your Productivity 5 13 Great Meeting Scheduler Apps to Help You Prioritize

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on November 29, 2021

How to Become Indistractable: 4 Powerful Tactics to Help You Focus

Advertising
How to Become Indistractable: 4 Powerful Tactics to Help You Focus

From modern technology to interactions with our friends, family, and coworkers, distractions are practically unavoidable. This makes it very hard to focus, especially for a sustained period of time on a specific task. Becoming indistractable, then, is an important skill to learn if we want to be truly productive.

Distractions aren’t going to decrease any time soon with advances in technology. Therefore, there is no better time than now to learn the best strategies to help you defeat distractions head on. Remember, many distractions may be out of your control, but you can learn to take charge of whether or not they take control of you.

In this article, you’ll learn not only why distractions are so destructive, but also why they exist in the first place, and a powerful technique that can help you get rid of them for good.

What Is a Distraction?

A distraction is anything that draws attention away from what you’re doing at a given moment. Examples include looking at your phone each time a notification pops up, chatting with people who stop by your office space while you’re working, or checking social media or emails while trying to finish a big project.

Distractions can cause problems for more than just a few seconds. When you switch your attention, you create attention residue, which can linger for an extended amount of time, getting in the way of your focus.

If you really want to become indistractable, you’ll need to overcome each distraction that steps in your path.

Traction: The Opposite of Distraction

We’ve come to the conclusion that distractions are bad, and we don’t want them interfering with what we need to get done. What we want to achieve is the opposite: traction. Now, there aren’t any official antonym for distraction. However, I propose it so as by definition traction is any action that moves us towards what we really want.

Traction is an action that you fully engage in with intent—following through with what you say you will do.

    How To Tell If You’re Distracted

    Most people find it quite common to be distracted. The bustle of everyday life, heightened by social media and other means of escapism into a reality that’s not ours, has offered everyone things to pass their time with.

    Today, being distracted leads to wasting a significant amount of time during the day. Yet, it is not addressed as seriously as it should be. If you can spot the signs of distraction, then you can tackle the issue in time and live the life you want to.

    “Most people don’t want to acknowledge the uncomfortable truth that distraction is always an unhealthy escape from reality.”
    [1]

    We have become so used to being distracted that we hardly see it as a bad thing anymore. Distraction can look different in various kinds of people. However, if you’re looking to become indistractable then here are signs to look out for to check if you’re becoming distracted so you can address the issue in time.

    • You find yourself wanting to check your phone frequently: Checking your phone often or feeling the need to constantly be active on social media during work hours or when you’re doing a task is one of the biggest signs of distraction.
    • You look at an object for a long time unable to figure out what to do with it: Although you have something to do, and the materials to do it with, you find it hard to figure out how to go about the task
    • The thing you’re working on feels so boring you want to do something fun: This stems from dissatisfaction with the work you’re doing. This dissatisfaction leads to you feeling bored with your task and seeking external comfort in something ‘fun’.
    • When you’re doing something mundane, you’re thinking about doing the things you like: Constantly thinking about things you like is what most people do when they cannot keep traction with the work in front of them. This usually happens when they are thinking about activities they look forward to once the task is over.
    • Audio-visual stimuli around you make it hard to focus on the task at hand: Although you’re working on the task, every voice or passing visual catches your attention. This may cause you to forget about work and listen in on a nearby conversation instead.

    The Reasons for Distraction

    When we talk about distractions, we’re talking about human behavior and reactions to the distractions themselves. And, all human behavior is marked by external or internal triggers.

    External Triggers

    External triggers

    are cues that we take from our environment that tell us what to do, such as pings from our phone or computer that prompt us to look at whatever the alert is announcing: an Instagram update, an email, a text from an old friend. These external triggers compete for our attention with whatever task we’re ultimately trying to focus on. Sometimes, the mere presence of an object itself, such as having your phone nearby, can prompt you to give it attention.

    Internal Triggers

    There are also internal triggers, which are simply cues that come from within, such as hunger, anxiety about an upcoming event, or feeling cold.

    All human behavior is prompted by external or internal triggers; therefore, traction and distraction both originate from the same source.

    How to Overcome Distraction and Become Indistractable

    Distractions can easily take over your life, but below I outline 4 simple tactics to take back your control and become indistractable. This concept I am sharing with you now draws from my book Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life.

    1. Master Internal Triggers

    To overcome distractions and slip into deep work, you first need to understand your root cause of distraction. Humans have a natural tendency to want to escape discomfort. Even at times where we are going after pleasure and positive events, our drive often revolves around freeing ourselves from the discomfort of wanting.

    In truth, we will turn to social media, emails, video games, and Netflix not necessarily for the pleasure that they provide, but because of how they free us from psychological discomfort within. While it provides temporary relief, it is an unhealthy way to deal with your life. Even though you can’t control all outside situations and occurrences, you can control how you react to those circumstances.

    Various studies show that when humans don’t give into an urge, craving or impulse, it can trigger rumination and make the desire grow even stronger. So, when you eventually give in, your reward is increased, which can turn quickly into an undesired habit.

    Identify the Feeling or Thought Behind Your Urge

    When you find yourself wanting to give into your distraction, stop and become familiar with the internal trigger. Are you feeling anxious, overtired, or maybe you’re underprepared for the task at hand?

    Write Your Feelings Down

    Using a log and writing down the time of day and what you were doing, along with the feeling that accompanies it. Doing so will help you link your own behaviors with your internal triggers, which will help you better notice the thoughts and feelings that precede certain behaviors and better manage them.

    Advertising

    Get Curious and Explore Your Feelings and Sensations

    Have a sense of curiosity towards your feelings. Notice if you have butterflies in your stomach, or a tightening in your muscles.

    2. Make Time for Traction

    Planning is critical to beating distractions, because if you don’t plan your day, surely someone else will! When you’re not clear on how you want to deal with your time and attention, anything and everything becomes a potential distraction.

    First, you need to turn your values into time. Of course, many of us want to spend more time with things that matter most to us: our family, friends and hobbies. But, we often fail to do so because we don’t make time for them in our day.

    So, you must acquire the attributes and values of the person you want to become.

    Examples might include becoming a contributing member of a team, spending quality time with your children, jumping into continuing education, becoming physically fit, or giving back to your community. Many of us wish to subscribe to these values, but without making the time to take actions to live them out, they’re simply empty aspirations.

    Timebox Your Schedule

    Timeboxing is, in my opinion, the most effective way to ensure time for your values. Timeboxing is the process of deciding what you’re going to do and exactly when you’re going to do it, helping you become indistractable.

    You simply create a daily calendar template for how to spend your time, so that you have no white space in your day. It isn’t important what you have planned to do, as long as you stick to it. If you feel a need to scroll through social media, just make sure you have planned appropriately for it.

    Be sure to include 15 minutes per week to reflect and refine your calendar, improving it week by week. You can ask yourself: When did I do what I said I would do, and when did I get distracted?

    At times where you became distracted, note what triggered it and come up with a strategy to use the next time the distraction or urge arises. Also ask: Are there changes I can make to my calendar that will give me the time I need to better express my values?

    Synch Your Schedule With Others

    Once your ideal week has been planned, be sure to notify others of importance in your life. Make a clear intention to stick with your plans and involve those who matter most. This could be related to sharing household responsibilities, alerting your boss to your timeline intentions at work, or even scheduling a date with your partner.

    3. Combat External Technical Triggers

    Tech companies are adept at using external triggers to hack into our attention. There are countless ways they do so, but our smartphone use is fueled by many of these triggers.

    Research shows that ignoring a call or message can be just as distracting as responding to one! If used properly, though, you can take control and rely on these external triggers to remind you to follow through with what you planned.

    Advertising

    To do so, simply ask whether the external trigger is serving you, or if you are serving it. If the trigger leads you to traction, keep it; if it leads you to distraction, get rid of it. A few things to consider:

    1. Remove any and all apps you no longer need.
    2. Remove any apps that you enjoy, but you can use on your computer instead.
    3. Reduce the clutter on your home screen by rearranging the apps on your phone.
    4. Remove notification settings for each app that you don’t need updates on (social media, etc.).

    4. Make a Pact to Prevent Distractions

    Forethought is the antidote to impulsivity and key to becoming indistractable. Therefore, it’s useful to pre-commit to something in order to overcome distraction.

    We cement these decisions far in advance of any temptations and distractions that may come our way. This should only be undertaken after you have followed the other three steps and learned to manage internal triggers, make time for traction, and reduce external triggers.

    Here are the three types of pacts:

    Effort Pact

    This is a kind of pre-commitment that requires you to increase the amount of effort towards something you would rather not do. Increasing your effort forces you make the decision as to whether the distraction is really worth it or not. Some great apps that can help you with this include SelfControl, Forest, and Freedom.

    Price Pact

    This pact puts money on the line, where you get to keep your money if you follow through with your intended behavior, and if you get distracted, you lose your funds.

    I committed to a price pact when finishing the first draft of my book, promising an accountability partner $10,000 if I failed to finish my draft by the set deadline. This was an incentive for me to finish writing my book and keep my money.

    Identity Pact

    This is the method of using your self-image to impact your behavior and become indistractable. By deciding on and undertaking a new identity, you will empower yourself to make decisions based on who you believe you are. Think about vegetarians—they do not have to expend much willpower to avoid eating meat because they have committed to that as part of their identity.

    To become a person who is indistractable, stop telling yourself you are a person with a “short attention span” or an “addictive personality.” Rather, tell yourself, “I am indistractable.” If you say to yourself that you are easily distracted, it instantly becomes a truth. Yet, if you commit to believing that you are indistractable, you will immediately begin to implement these strategies, which will empower you to conquer any distraction that comes your way.

    Easy to Use Tools That Help You Stay Focused

    Technology doesn’t have to be the enemy if you’re looking to become more focused and avoid distractions. Some anti-distraction tools and apps help keep you focused by blocking out possible causes for distraction.

    You might be the sort of person who faces distraction at work, or you just can’t make yourself sit down at your desk and get to work, but there’s always hope. Here are some of the best tools that remove distractions and bring out your best potential.

    1. Dewo

    This apps blocks all distracting social media apps automatically, keeping you free from notifications and the constant light-up of your screen. The best part of Dewo is that it gets accustomed to your focus patterns and can even go on ‘automatic’ mode for you.

    Advertising

    You can ask the app to schedule meetings and appointments for people in your contacts, and it simply picks the most convenient time for you that won’t interfere with your focus schedule.

    2. Freedom

    The Freedom app, much contrary to its name, restricts websites and locks up the internet during focus hours. Once you’ve made up your mind to lock up apps then it won’t let you access them regardless of how you feel later.

    For those who find themselves distracted even on their laptop, this app will work on the computer as well. Most people may consider these methods ruthless, but they are incredibly effective.

    3. Focusme

    Readers who are looking for an app that helps them create healthy work patterns, minimize distraction, block attractive sites, and much more – FocusMe is the perfect app for you. This app helps block out certain apps and sites for selected periods.

    It also gets used to the owner’s work ethic and gives helpful tips and suggestions on what apps to block and when to take breaks. This increases productivity and reduces the chances of dissatisfaction and boredom.

    The Bottom Line

    To become indistractable, you don’t need to have superpowers. It’s truly as easy as following the few steps mentioned above. When you master internal triggers, make time for traction, dissolve any extraneous external triggers, and prevent distractions by creating pacts, you will reshape your entire life.

    However, the important part is to understand that to make a difference, you need to act now. There is no better time to regain control over your life than the present. Taking things step-by-step helps you sustainably achieve your goals. You want to be indistractable for the rest of your life, not just for the week.

    Once you have the ability to see tasks to the end after having committed to them, nothing in life can derail you from your path. This is why indistractability is important, it disciplines you to deal with the harsh realities of life.

    Here are some tips on how to work on your traction just as you finish reading this article.

    • Go through your apps and remove ones that are absolutely unnecessary to your life and goal. You may keep only two that you use for games or recreation.
    • Practice mindfulness through keeping a diary, making observations about your day, having a to-do list, and much more.
    • Whenever you find yourself distracted, re-evaluate the place of that distraction in your life and how it implicates your life’s goals.

    More to Help You Stay Focused

    Featured photo credit: Austin Distel via unsplash.com

    Reference

    [1] Nir Eyal, Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life

    Read Next