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Last Updated on November 27, 2020

How to Get More Energy for an Instant Morning Boost

How to Get More Energy for an Instant Morning Boost

The sound of your alarm clock goes off. It’s Monday morning. You don’t feel like getting out of bed, let alone completing your morning tasks. Now would be a good time to know how to get more energy in the morning.

Mornings are only easy for a select few people. It’s possible to train your body to get up and get moving without any trouble, but it takes time and dedication. For those of us who struggle with feeling tired in the morning, it’s important to develop strategies for a morning boost.

Here are 11 tips to help you get moving in the morning.

1. Set Your Alarm Clock to Play Your Favorite Music

The sound of most alarm clocks is miserable and can elicit feelings of anxiety in many people. Thus, by using a standard alarm clock, the first thought in your head each day is a negative one. That’s a terrible way to start the day!

Instead, set up your alarm clock to play music that makes you happy. The first thought in your head each day will be a bright one. Unlike with an annoying alarm clock sound, you won’t even want to push the snooze button! You will just want to dance, and you can’t sleep when you’re dancing.

Before you know it, you’ll be in a headspace that will make it easier to get out from under the covers.

2. Drink Caffeine Shortly After Waking

Often, people feel sluggish and slow for the first hour or two after waking up. Feeling groggy leads to lower productivity and means more time spent on certain tasks than is necessary.

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To eliminate the morning groggy feeling, drink a cup of coffee or tea within about fifteen minutes of waking up. It prevents you from wanting to go back to sleep and will give you the energy you need to get your morning tasks done quicker and get to work on time.

3. Place Your Alarm Clock Far From Your Bed

By placing your alarm clock far from your bed, you will be required to get out of bed to turn it off. Use a dresser or a windowsill, but make sure you have to take at least a few steps to get to it.

Getting out of bed is often the hardest part about waking up in the morning. By getting out of bed faster, you increase the likelihood of starting your day instead of pressing the snooze button.

4. Exercise in the Morning

Some light exercise in the morning will get your endorphins flowing and give you more energy. The optimal duration and intensity of exercise varies from person to person.

After a brief workout at the gym, I feel energized and ready to take on the day. In addition, it leaves the rest of my day open for other activities.

If you prefer something more relaxing, get out and take a short morning walk when you wake up. Studies have shown that workers who receive exposure to natural light in the morning tend to sleep better at night experience less depression, and fall asleep quicker[1]. These are all great reasons to get outside in the morning!

5. Drink Water Right Before Going to Sleep

When you drink enough water before going to sleep, you’ll have to go to the bathroom early in the morning. This will make you want to get up and prevent you from falling back to sleep.

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However, try to avoid excess amounts of water within the few hours prior to going to sleep as it may cause you to wake up in the middle of the night. I recommend experimenting to find the optimal timing and quantity of water to drink prior to sleeping.

6. Leave Your Blinds Open

Leaving your blinds open at night will allow the sun to enter your room and wake you up, helping you feel more alert. The sun is also a source of vitamin D, which is a natural source of energy.

One article pointed out that “waking up with the sun also allows your body to wake up gradually, in a natural process, instead of being startled out of much-needed REM sleep — a.k.a. the deep sleep your brain needs to learn, store memories, and regulate your emotions — with a piercing, sudden alarm”[2].

7. Eat Before Sleeping

One of the reasons why you feel groggy and slow in the morning is because you haven’t had any sustenance during the eight hours you were asleep. A small snack before bed can help prevent this feeling.

You can check out this article for the best bedtime snacks and drinks.

I usually eat a low-carbohydrate and easy to digest snack, such as cottage cheese, yogurt, milk and/or peanut butter. Too much food or those that are difficult to digest may prevent you from sleeping, so it’s best to experiment to find the best quantity and types of food to eat before you sleep.

8. Eat When You Wake Up

A small and easy-to-digest meal in the morning will give you a boost of energy. As discussed above, during your 8 hours of sleep, you haven’t provided your body with any sustenance. I recommend a piece of fruit, yogurt, or muesli with whole grains.

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A healthy breakfast is key to giving your body the boost it needs when you want to know how to get more energy. Try to make sure you get a good balance of protein, healthy fats, and carbs in the morning to give your body everything it needs to produce the energy you’ll need for the day.

Here is some inspiration to help you create a great breakfast: 31 Healthy Breakfast Recipes That Will Super Boost Your Energy

9. Go to Sleep and Wake up at the Same Time Each Day

Keeping a regular and consistent sleep schedule helps your body get in to a natural rhythm. By doing so, you will begin to naturally fall asleep and wake up at the same time each day as your circadian rhythm gets into a consistent pattern[3]. Waking up will feel more natural, and you will have more energy in the morning.

Use your circadian rhythm when you want to learn how to get more energy.

    In addition, it will help you fall asleep earlier. Getting the right amount of sleep will help you feel more energized. Staying up too late when you have to be up early the next morning can be detrimental to energy levels.

    10. Do Something You Enjoy Doing in the Morning

    Stimulating your mind by doing an inspiring or enjoyable activity will give you energy. Knowing that you will be doing something fun will make you more eager to get out of bed in the morning.

    Some ideas of things you can include in your morning routine are:

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    • Doing a short yoga practice
    • Reading an interesting book
    • Journaling
    • Going for a run

    Find what motivates you to get out of bed and get moving.

    11. Schedule Something in the Morning

    Having “peer accountability” is one of the most effective motivators. If someone is dependent on you for something or monitoring your progress, you will feel motivated to do it.

    Scheduling a breakfast or workout with a peer will give you a clear deadline to attain in the morning, thus giving you a kick-start.

    The Bottom Line

    If you want to know how to get more energy, start to apply these simple ways in your daily routine. Maybe add one of them to your routine every month. Gradually, you will have more energy throughout the day. You will also be more productive and achieve more!

    More Tips to Help You Get More Energy

    Featured photo credit: Dayne Topkin via unsplash.com

    Reference

    More by this author

    Mike Fishbein

    Mike is an enterpreneur and digital marketing leader.

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    Last Updated on January 22, 2021

    5 Simple Stretches to Boost Your Energy at Your Office Desk

    5 Simple Stretches to Boost Your Energy at Your Office Desk

    Everyone knows that sitting for long periods of time is bad for your body and your mind. Getting the blood flowing helps you stay fresh with creativity, boosts energy, and helps your body work more efficiently. Many of us don’t have the opportunity to get up and move around as often as we should, but simple stretches added in during the day can help.

    Studies have found that prolonged sitting can lead to increased risk in obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, deep-vein thrombosis, and metabolic syndrome. Sitting is also known to increase pain by tightening the hip flexor and hamstring muscle, as well as stiffening the joints. This can cause problems with balance and gait in addition to the obvious discomfort.[1]

    One study found that “greater total sedentary time” and “longer sedentary bout duration” were both associated with a higher risk of death. Basically, those who moved around less were more likely to die from any cause[2].

    While many of us have busy schedules that limit the amount of time we can exercise each day, doing simple stretches throughout the day at your desk can be a great option to encourage movement, even if it’s just for a few minutes.

    Here are 5 simple stretches you can do while sitting to improve your mind and body.

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    1. Seated Twist

    12 Chair Yoga Poses for Stress and Posture - PureWow

      Sitting in your chair while keeping a long, tall spine, place your right hand on the outside of your left knee. Use that hand as leverage to twist to your left, and place your left hand as far to the right as possible to have something to hang onto while you twist. Now join it with your breath.

      Exhale as you move into your twist, and inhale as you ease off. Repeat on the other side. Repeat for each side 2-3 times.

      This simple stretch is great to offer a release for your back, neck, and shoulders. The twist will also help rinse out your internal organs, giving you a little boost of energy.

      2. Chest/Shoulder Opener

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      Blog: Simple Yoga Techniques to Increase Effectiveness at Work

        Sitting on the edge of your chair, clasp your hands behind your back, opening up your chest and shoulders. Inhale/exhale several times, noticing that when you inhale your stretch increases. Release and repeat 2-3 times.

        This stretch, while aimed at the chest muscles, can also alleviate some upper back pain, as we often feel pain in this area when our chest muscles are tight. This will also open up your lungs, allowing you to take some deep breaths, which can help reduce stress.

        3. Seated Pigeon

        Yoga In The Office: 6 Chair Poses To Improve Your Posture

          I call this one Seated Pigeon as it is a cousin to the yoga pose called Pigeon, which is performed lying on the floor. Clearly this isn’t an option at work. This Seated Pigeon version might not work if you are wearing a short skirt or dress unless you have an office to yourself!

          Sit on the edge of your chair and place your right ankle over your left knee. Be sure that your left foot is directly under your left knee and flat on the floor. Sit nice and tall, imagining a string is pulling the crown of your head up towards the ceiling.

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          This one is great for releasing your gluteus medius and minimus muscles, as well as your piriformis muscles. These are your hip abductors. These are usually what aches when you sit so much! Hold each stretch for about 30 seconds, and repeat on each side 2-3 times.

          This will offer a great release in the hips, as well as create stability in the knee joint. Both of these will help you avoid pain once you get up to leave work for the day.

          4. Hip Flexor Stretch

          Self-Care | Stretching exercises, Hip flexor stretch, Exercise

            Sitting truly shortens and tightens your little hip flexor. This sits at the front in the crease of your hip. It runs through your pelvis to your back, so when it is tight, it often presents with an achy back.

            To lengthen this muscle while at your desk, sit at the edge of your chair, but shift to face to your left. Take your right leg and extend it behind you with as straight a knee as you can. Sit tall, and lift your sternum while trying to tuck your tailbone under, as this will deepen the stretch.

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            Repeat on the other side. Repeat for both sides 2-3 times.

            5. Hamstring Stretch

            The Best Hamstring Stretches for Sore or Tight Hamstrings | Shape

              This is an easy one to do either just before you sit down or just after getting up. While standing, soften your right knee and extend your left leg in front of you with your heel on the floor. On your left leg, draw your toes upwards, keep your knee slightly bent so you don’t strain your ligaments behind your knee.

              You want to feel the stretch in the belly of the muscle (that is, your mid-thigh, at the back of your leg) rather than behind the knee. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds and switch to the other side. Repeat each side 2-3 times.

              Stretching out your hamstring can help relieve knee and lower back pain. It can also help increase your balance and range of motion. If you like to spend your free time running or jogging, your hamstrings will be grateful you took a moment to stretch them out at work as these muscles are notorious for tightening up quickly.

              The Bottom Line

              It isn’t necessary to do all of the stretches all at once. Take a stretch break every 45 minutes or so and choose a couple of different stretches. Next time, choose a different set of simple stretches. Ultimately, your brain and body will thank you for it!

              More Stretches for Your Day

              Featured photo credit: Keren Levand via unsplash.com

              Reference

              [1] Harvard Health Publishing: The dangers of sitting
              [2] Annals of Internal Medicine: Patterns of Sedentary Behavior and Mortality in U.S. Middle-Aged and Older Adults

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