Advertising

Last Updated on November 27, 2020

How to Get More Energy for an Instant Morning Boost

Advertising
How to Get More Energy for an Instant Morning Boost

The sound of your alarm clock goes off. It’s Monday morning. You don’t feel like getting out of bed, let alone completing your morning tasks. Now would be a good time to know how to get more energy in the morning.

Mornings are only easy for a select few people. It’s possible to train your body to get up and get moving without any trouble, but it takes time and dedication. For those of us who struggle with feeling tired in the morning, it’s important to develop strategies for a morning boost.

Here are 11 tips to help you get moving in the morning.

1. Set Your Alarm Clock to Play Your Favorite Music

The sound of most alarm clocks is miserable and can elicit feelings of anxiety in many people. Thus, by using a standard alarm clock, the first thought in your head each day is a negative one. That’s a terrible way to start the day!

Instead, set up your alarm clock to play music that makes you happy. The first thought in your head each day will be a bright one. Unlike with an annoying alarm clock sound, you won’t even want to push the snooze button! You will just want to dance, and you can’t sleep when you’re dancing.

Before you know it, you’ll be in a headspace that will make it easier to get out from under the covers.

2. Drink Caffeine Shortly After Waking

Often, people feel sluggish and slow for the first hour or two after waking up. Feeling groggy leads to lower productivity and means more time spent on certain tasks than is necessary.

Advertising

To eliminate the morning groggy feeling, drink a cup of coffee or tea within about fifteen minutes of waking up. It prevents you from wanting to go back to sleep and will give you the energy you need to get your morning tasks done quicker and get to work on time.

3. Place Your Alarm Clock Far From Your Bed

By placing your alarm clock far from your bed, you will be required to get out of bed to turn it off. Use a dresser or a windowsill, but make sure you have to take at least a few steps to get to it.

Getting out of bed is often the hardest part about waking up in the morning. By getting out of bed faster, you increase the likelihood of starting your day instead of pressing the snooze button.

4. Exercise in the Morning

Some light exercise in the morning will get your endorphins flowing and give you more energy. The optimal duration and intensity of exercise varies from person to person.

After a brief workout at the gym, I feel energized and ready to take on the day. In addition, it leaves the rest of my day open for other activities.

If you prefer something more relaxing, get out and take a short morning walk when you wake up. Studies have shown that workers who receive exposure to natural light in the morning tend to sleep better at night experience less depression, and fall asleep quicker[1]. These are all great reasons to get outside in the morning!

5. Drink Water Right Before Going to Sleep

When you drink enough water before going to sleep, you’ll have to go to the bathroom early in the morning. This will make you want to get up and prevent you from falling back to sleep.

Advertising

However, try to avoid excess amounts of water within the few hours prior to going to sleep as it may cause you to wake up in the middle of the night. I recommend experimenting to find the optimal timing and quantity of water to drink prior to sleeping.

6. Leave Your Blinds Open

Leaving your blinds open at night will allow the sun to enter your room and wake you up, helping you feel more alert. The sun is also a source of vitamin D, which is a natural source of energy.

One article pointed out that “waking up with the sun also allows your body to wake up gradually, in a natural process, instead of being startled out of much-needed REM sleep — a.k.a. the deep sleep your brain needs to learn, store memories, and regulate your emotions — with a piercing, sudden alarm”[2].

7. Eat Before Sleeping

One of the reasons why you feel groggy and slow in the morning is because you haven’t had any sustenance during the eight hours you were asleep. A small snack before bed can help prevent this feeling.

You can check out this article for the best bedtime snacks and drinks.

I usually eat a low-carbohydrate and easy to digest snack, such as cottage cheese, yogurt, milk and/or peanut butter. Too much food or those that are difficult to digest may prevent you from sleeping, so it’s best to experiment to find the best quantity and types of food to eat before you sleep.

8. Eat When You Wake Up

A small and easy-to-digest meal in the morning will give you a boost of energy. As discussed above, during your 8 hours of sleep, you haven’t provided your body with any sustenance. I recommend a piece of fruit, yogurt, or muesli with whole grains.

Advertising

A healthy breakfast is key to giving your body the boost it needs when you want to know how to get more energy. Try to make sure you get a good balance of protein, healthy fats, and carbs in the morning to give your body everything it needs to produce the energy you’ll need for the day.

Here is some inspiration to help you create a great breakfast: 31 Healthy Breakfast Recipes That Will Super Boost Your Energy

9. Go to Sleep and Wake up at the Same Time Each Day

Keeping a regular and consistent sleep schedule helps your body get in to a natural rhythm. By doing so, you will begin to naturally fall asleep and wake up at the same time each day as your circadian rhythm gets into a consistent pattern[3]. Waking up will feel more natural, and you will have more energy in the morning.

Use your circadian rhythm when you want to learn how to get more energy.

    In addition, it will help you fall asleep earlier. Getting the right amount of sleep will help you feel more energized. Staying up too late when you have to be up early the next morning can be detrimental to energy levels.

    10. Do Something You Enjoy Doing in the Morning

    Stimulating your mind by doing an inspiring or enjoyable activity will give you energy. Knowing that you will be doing something fun will make you more eager to get out of bed in the morning.

    Some ideas of things you can include in your morning routine are:

    Advertising

    • Doing a short yoga practice
    • Reading an interesting book
    • Journaling
    • Going for a run

    Find what motivates you to get out of bed and get moving.

    11. Schedule Something in the Morning

    Having “peer accountability” is one of the most effective motivators. If someone is dependent on you for something or monitoring your progress, you will feel motivated to do it.

    Scheduling a breakfast or workout with a peer will give you a clear deadline to attain in the morning, thus giving you a kick-start.

    The Bottom Line

    If you want to know how to get more energy, start to apply these simple ways in your daily routine. Maybe add one of them to your routine every month. Gradually, you will have more energy throughout the day. You will also be more productive and achieve more!

    More Tips to Help You Get More Energy

    Featured photo credit: Dayne Topkin via unsplash.com

    Reference

    More by this author

    Mike Fishbein

    Mike is an enterpreneur and digital marketing leader.

    15 Fast and Easy Ways to Boost Mental Energy Levels How to Get More Energy for an Instant Morning Boost 10 Business Networking Tips: Grow Your Professional Network How Blogging Can Help You Grow Your Professional Network 5 Antidotes for a Burnout

    Trending in Restore Energy

    1 7 Reasons Why Your Body Feels Heavy And Tired 2 Why Do I Feel Tired After Eating? (And How to Avoid It) 3 The Real Reason Why You Feel Exhausted (No Matter How Much You Sleep) 4 7 Common Signs of Work Burnout And How To Deal With Them 5 7 Signs You’re Burnt out (And How to Bounce Back)

    Read Next

    Advertising
    Advertising

    Last Updated on October 7, 2021

    7 Reasons Why Your Body Feels Heavy And Tired

    Advertising
    7 Reasons Why Your Body Feels Heavy And Tired

    Interestingly enough, this topic about our bodies feeling heavy and tired has been assigned right around the time when I have been personally experiencing feelings of such “sluggishness.” In my case, it comes down to not exercising as much as I was a year ago, as well as being busier with work. I’m just starting to get back into a training routine after having moved and needing to set up my home gym again at my new house.

    Generally speaking, when feeling heavy and tired, it comes down to bioenergetics. Bioenergetics is a field in biochemistry and cell biology that concerns energy flow through living systems.[1] The goal of bioenergetics is to describe how living organisms acquire and transform energy to perform biological work. Essentially, how we acquire, store, and utilize the energy within the body relates directly to whether we feel heavy or tired.

    While bioenergetics relates primarily to the energy of the body, one’s total bandwidth of energy highly depends on one’s mental state. Here are seven reasons why your body feels heavy and tired.

    1. Lack of Sleep

    This is quite possibly one of the main reasons why people feel heavy and/or tired. I often feel like a broken record explaining to people the importance of quality sleep and REM specifically.

    Advertising

    The principle of energy conservation states that energy is neither created nor destroyed. It may transform from one type to another. Based on the energy conservation theory, we need sleep to conserve energy. When getting quality sleep, we reduce our caloric needs by spending part of our time functioning at a lower metabolism. This concept is backed by the way our metabolic rate drops during sleep.

    Research suggests that eight hours of sleep for human beings can produce a daily energy savings of 35 percent over complete wakefulness. The energy conservation theory of sleep suggests that the main purpose of sleep is to reduce a person’s energy use during times of the day and night.[2]

    2. Lack of Exercise

    Exercise is an interesting one because when you don’t feel energized, it can be difficult to find the motivation to work out. However, if you do find it in you to exercise, you’ll be pleasantly surprised by its impact on your energy levels. Technically, any form of exercise/physical activity will get the heart rate up and blood flowing. It will also result in the release of endorphins, which, in turn, are going to raise energy levels. Generally speaking, effort-backed cardiovascular exercises will strengthen your heart and give you more stamina.

    I’m in the process of having my home gym renovated after moving to a new house. Over the past year, I have been totally slacking with exercise and training. I can personally say that over the last year, I have had less physical energy than I did previously while training regularly. Funny enough I have been a Lifehack author for a few years now, and almost all previous articles were written while I was training regularly. I’m writing this now as someone that has not exercised enough and can provide first-hand anecdotal evidence that exercise begets more energy, period.

    Advertising

    3. Poor Nutrition and Hydration

    The human body is primarily comprised of water (up to 60%), so naturally, a lack of hydration will deplete energy. According to studies, the brain and heart are composed of 73% water and the lungs are about 83% water. The skin contains 64% water, muscles and kidneys are 79%, and even the bones are watery: 31%.[3] If you don’t consume sufficient amounts of water (and I suggest natural spring water or alkaline water), you will likely have more issues than just a lack of energy.

    In regards to nutrition, a fairly common-sense practice is to avoid excess sugar. Consuming too much sugar can harm the body and brain, often causing short bursts of energy (highs) followed by mental fogginess, and physical fatigue or crashes. Generally, sugar-based drinks, candy, and pastries put too much fuel (sugar) into your blood too quickly.

    I have utilized these types of foods immediately before training for a quick source of energy. However, outside of that application, there is practically no benefit. When consuming sugar in such a way, the ensuing crash leaves you tired and hungry again. “Complex carbs,” healthy fats, and protein take longer to digest, satisfy your hunger, and thus, provide a slow, steady stream of energy.

    4. Stress

    Stress is surprisingly overlooked in our fast-paced society, yet it’s the number one cause of several conditions. Feeling heavy and tired is just one aspect of the symptoms of stress. Stress has been shown to affect all systems of the body including the musculoskeletal, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, nervous, and reproductive systems.[4] Stress causes the body to release the hormone cortisol, which is produced by the adrenal glands. This can lead to adrenal fatigue, the symptoms of which are fatigue, brain fog, intermittent “crashes” throughout the day, and much more.[5]

    Advertising

    It’s important to look at stress thoroughly in life and take action to mitigate it as much as possible. Personally, I spend Monday to Friday in front of dozens of devices and screens and managing large teams (15 to 30) of people. On weekends, I go for long walks in nature (known as shinrin-yoku in Japan), I use sensory deprivation tanks, and I experiment with supplementation (being a biohacker).

    5. Depression or Anxiety

    These two often go hand in hand with stress. It’s also overlooked much in our society, yet millions upon millions around the work experience symptoms of depression and anxiety. Many that are depressed report symptoms of lack of energy, enthusiasm, and generally not even wanting to get up from bed in the morning.

    These are also conditions that should be examined closely within oneself and take actions to make improvements. I’m a big proponent of the use of therapeutic psychedelics, such as Psilocybin or MDMA. I’m an experienced user of mushrooms, from the psychedelic variety to the non-psychedelic. In fact, the majority of my sensory deprivation tank sessions are with the use of various strains of Psilocybin mushrooms. Much research has been coming to light around the benefits of such substances to eliminate symptoms of depression, anxiety, PTSD, and more.[6]

    6. Hypothyroidism

    Also known as underactive thyroid disease, hypothyroidism is a health condition where the thyroid gland doesn’t produce sufficient levels. This condition causes the metabolism to slow down.[7] While it can also be called underactive thyroid, hypothyroidism can make you feel tired and even gain weight. A common treatment for hypothyroidism is hormone replacement therapy.

    Advertising

    7. Caffeine Overload

    I’m writing this as someone that went from five cups of coffee a day to now three cups a week! I’ve almost fully switched to decaf. The reason I stopped consuming so much coffee is that it was affecting my mood and energy levels. Generally, excessive consumption of caffeine can also impact the adrenal gland, which, as I covered above, can almost certainly lead to low energy and random energy crashes.

    Final Thoughts

    The most important thing is to identify that you feel heavy or tired and take action to improve the situation. Never fall into complacency with feeling lethargic or low energy, as human beings tend to accept such conditions as the norm fairly quickly. If you’ve made it this far, you’re on the right path!

    Examine various aspects of your life and where you can make room for improvement to put your mental, emotional, and physical self first. I certainly hope these seven reasons why your body feels heavy, tired, or low on energy can help you along the path to a healthy and more vibrant you.

    More Tips on Restoring Energy

    Featured photo credit: Zohre Nemati via unsplash.com

    Advertising

    Reference

    Read Next