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Last Updated on April 9, 2018

20 Simple Ways to Bring Positive Energy into Your Life Right Now

20 Simple Ways to Bring Positive Energy into Your Life Right Now

Staying positive can be tough. Positivity can start to wain when you are bombarded with a succession of negativity, failures, disappointment and heartbreak.

Every challenge you face withdraws from your energy, resilience and a little bit of your faith. Once your positive energy is depleted, pessimism slowly begins to creep in and take hold.

To help you stay positive, I will tell you the secrets to revive positive energy in this article so you can try out all these ways to lead a happy life.

Where does positive energy come from?

Positive thinking is a mental and emotional state of mind that focuses on the good and expects positive outcomes.

Developing and maintaining positive energy involves more than merely thinking happy thoughts. It is the anticipation of good (i.e. happiness, health and success) and it is the belief that all things — situations, obstacles and difficulties — will work out favorably in the end.

Optimism does not involve ignoring negativity. It is the acknowledgement of the negative but then choosing to focus on the positive. At its root, it is simply the belief that despite the current circumstances things will work out favorable in the end.

A positive mind comes from a heart full of faith.

20 ways to revive positive energy

If you want to stay positive when facing challenges and negative situations, here are 20 things you can do to help revive your positive energy:

1. Enjoy nature

Research shows that revelling in the great outdoors promotes human health. Spending time in serene natural environments has been scientifically proven to lower stress levels, improve working memory and provide a sense of rejuvenation.[1].

2. Perform random acts of kindness

Finding ways to put a smile on the face of others affects you just as much as it affects them. It takes the focus off of you and your problems and allows you to be a positive force in the lives of others.

Doing good for others makes you feel good. It lifts your mood, improves self esteem and self-worth and it serves as a small distraction from your current challenges.

3. Develop an attitude of gratitude

Noticing and appreciating the positives in our lives is a great way to lift your spirits and provide yourself a mental boost.[2]

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Start to practice gratitude by being thankful for the simple things in life. Check out this article for: 60 Things To Be Thankful For In Life

4. Take a mental break

Exhaustion is the silent killer of positivity.

Learn to take breaks when things get overwhelming.[3] Do something that gives your mind a break from whatever challenge you are facing–and that could just mean taking a nap.

5. Laugh

Laughter truly is the best medicine for most of what ails us.[4] Laughter strengthens your immune system, boosts mood, diminishes pain, and protects you from the damaging effects of stress.

Find a way to laugh–often. Watch a comedy, spend the evening with your crazy friend who knows how to keep you in stitches. Host a game night with your friends.

More ways to make you laugh here: 18 Simple Ways To Put Laughter Back Into Your Life

6. Hang around with positive people

Research suggests that stress is contagious[5] — and the more you surround yourself with it, the more likely you are to let it affect your thoughts. In the same way that stress and negativity are contagious, so is happiness.[6]

You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” The bottom line here is our behavior and thought patterns mirror those we hang around. Choose carefully who you allow into your circle.

7. Look for the silver lining immediately

Trying to force optimistic thinking amidst emotional turmoil or a bit shocked usually don’t work that well.

Training yourself to look for the lesson and find the bright spot not only eases the burden a little, it also slowly begins to transform your entire thought process.

8. Breathe deeply

Breathing exercises help expel toxic air from your body and refills your body and more importantly–your brain with fresh air. It clears your mind and allows you to regain mental clarity. One moment of clarity at the right time can change everything.[7]

Watch this video and learn how to breathe to reduce anxiety and stress:

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9. Don’t dwell on negativity

Avoid dwelling on downers. Downers bring you down!

Focusing on negatives isn’t just unpleasant, it also makes you less effective in tackling other tasks you face. Negativity produces more negativity.

Bad things happen–try not to replay them over and over and fixate on un-pleasantries. Play positive scenes in your mind instead.

10. Engage in positive self-talk

Talk to yourself. Tell yourself things are going to turnaround and will work out in the end.

Say it out loud. Speaking what you believe out loud reinforces and strengthens the message. You say it and hear it simultaneously.[8]

Here is a step-by-step guide to help yourself engage in positive self-talk: How To Stop Negative Self-Talk From Ruining Your Life

11. Talk it out with a friend

Find a positive friend (or small group of friends) or confidant to talk to. Talking helps you hear the problem, admit and discuss your feelings and it gives you another set of eyes and ears working on the problem.

You may find that brainstorming with another person or even a group will help you come up with new ideas to help you resolve the issue.

It also reassures you that someone has your back and that emotional support makes a difference. Think of it as a low-budget therapy.[9]

12. Take a walk

Scientists have found that one of the best ways to chase the blues away is by going for a walk.[10]

A brisk Walk or calms you down by sparking nerve cells in the brain that relax the senses.

13. Engage in rigorous exercise

Getting sweaty is not just good for your heart–it’s good for your head too!

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Research on anxiety, depression and exercise shows that the psychological and physical benefits of exercise helps reduce anxiety and elevates your mood.[11] When you engage in vigorous physical activity, the “feel good” brain chemicals (neurotransmitters, endorphins and endocannabinoids) are released that ease feelings of negativity. It distracts you from your issues, and it physically relaxes you.

Find yourself too busy to do exercises? Here are 5 Ways to Find Time for Exercise

14. Sleep

Proper rest is a critical part of maintaining a positive attitude.

Studies have shown that even partial sleep deprivation has a significant effect on your mental state. Researchers from University of Pennsylvania discovered that subjects who were limited to less than 5 hours of sleep a night for one week felt significantly more stressed, angry, sad, and mentally exhausted.[12]

t’s hard to maintain a positive mindset under those conditions. Get some sleep!

15. Journal

Journaling is a great way to deal with overwhelming emotions. It provides a healthy outlet in which you can express yourself and manage your emotions and overall mental health.

Keeping a journal can help you identify and track the causes of negative thinking and develop a mitigation plan.[13]

Here’s how to get started with writing a journal: Why You Should Keep A Journal And How To Get Started

16. Play hooky

Taking the occasional break from the daily grind is fun, freeing and necessary.

Figure out what makes you feel alive and happy and do that. Whether it’s watching Netflix in your p.j.’s all day or if it’s kayaking down a river–the goal is to have fun–whatever that means to you.

17. Treat yourself

Rewarding yourself with “me time” and celebrating who you are as a person is vital to sustaining a positive outlook.[14]

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Find small, meaningful and healthy ways to indulge yourself from time to time. Here are some nice ideas for you: 30 Ways To Treat Yourself No Matter What

18. Move through your day mindfully

Worry and dwelling on pervasively stressful thoughts with are optimism assassins. Living mindfully involves consciously deciding to be fully present in each moment.

When you throw all of your attention, energy and resources on the now, you don’t have the space for negative thoughts or worrying.[15]

Let’s take a look at this quick technique on how to practice mindfulness:[16]

    19. Take care of yourself spiritually

    Paying attention to and investing in yourself spiritually is something most people neglect.

    You watch what you eat, workout, try to get enough sleep and do all the things you should to keep your body and mind fit and functioning. But part of maintaining good mental health and a positive state of mind is soul care.

    Take time to feed your soul and keep the mind- body-spirit connection strong by engaging in spirit enhancing, contemplative activities such as meditation, prayer, reading spiritual materials and/or attending religious services.[17]

    20. Celebrate small wins

    Who doesn’t love a good celebration? Celebrating small victories is one of the quickest ways to give negativity the boot.

    Getting out of bed this morning is a win! Celebrate it. If you stayed in bed today and got a little extra rest–that too is a win!

    Instead of focusing on pending doom or sulking over losses–actively seek out and celebrate the things you do well and a the things you did get right today.

    Check out these tips to help you make celebrating small wins a daily habit: 4 Simple Steps to Always Remember to Celebrate Small Wins

    Bonus: 10 inspirational picture quotes to jump start your positivity

      Featured photo credit: Pixels via pexels.com

      Reference

      More by this author

      Denise Hill

      Speech Writer/Senior Editor

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      Last Updated on January 15, 2019

      What Are Interpersonal Skills? Master Them for Better Relationships

      What Are Interpersonal Skills? Master Them for Better Relationships

      When I wrote my book Extraordinary PR, Ordinary Budget: A Strategy Guide, I was surprised at the various layers of review and editing necessary to get the book to publication. Before I ever submitted the manuscript, I enlisted a former colleague to read and copy edit my work. Then, I submitted my work to an editor at the publisher’s house, and once she approved it, she sent it to her colleagues and then her company’s editorial board.

      Upon editorial board approval of my book, my editor sent my work to reviewers in my field, then a developmental editor, then a designer and layout team and, finally, another copy editor. There were a host of personalities with whom I needed to interact along the way.

      It turns out that getting a publishing contract was just the beginning – a lot happens between developing a concept, writing the book, finding an agent and publisher, and getting the book on bookshelves or on Audible or Kindle. Through every milestone of the publishing process, my ability to interact with others was crucial. This underscored for me that no matter what or how much a person accomplishes, you never do it alone – everyone needs assistance from others.

      While I conceived of the book and wrote the manuscript, there is no way my book could have hit booksellers’ shelves without the dozens of people who were involved in the publishing process. Further, interpersonal skills can propel or stonewall success.

      Even as someone who has written hundreds of essays, press releases, pitch notes and other correspondence, writing itself is not a solitary endeavor. Sure, I may write in solitude, but the moment I am finished writing, there are always clients, colleagues, partners, peers and others who review my content.

      What is more, even as a published author and contributor for this platform, I try to never submit final copy (content) that has not been copy edited. I send everything to my copy editor, whom I pay out of my own pocket, for her review, edits and approval. Once she has reviewed my work, caught unbeknownst-to-me errors, I am much more confident putting my work out in the world.

      How Interpersonal Skills Affect Relationships

      It is clearer to me now more than ever before that interpersonal skills are needed in every profession and every trade.

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      People don’t elect leaders because the leaders are smart. Individuals are motivated to vote when they have a hero and when they feel they have something to lose. If they seriously dislike the other candidate, they are much more likely vote according to a 2000 Ohio State University study:

      “A disliked candidate is seen as a threat, and that will be motivation to go to the polls. But a threat alone isn’t enough – people need to have a hero to vote for, too, in order to inspire them to turn out on Election Day.”

      In a work setting, interpersonal skills impact every facet of your development and success. Trainers must collaborate with a design team or the company hiring them to facilitate the training. During the training itself, the facilitators must connect with the audience and establish a rapport that supports vulnerability and openness. If the trainers interact poorly with the trainees, they are unlikely to be invited back. If they are invited back, they may be unlikely to inspire cooperation or growth in their trainees.

      Solopreneurs interactions with clients and subcontractors, and those interactions will, in part, support or adversely impact their business. If you enjoy a career as an acclaimed surgeon or respected lawyer, your interactions with patients, clients, health insurance agencies and a team of other practitioners – many of whom are shielded from public view – will improve or decimate your practice.

      As a hiring manager, one of the things I consider when interviewing candidates is their interpersonal skills. I assess the interpersonal skills they display in their content and face-to-face presentation. I ask probing questions to learn how they interact with others, manage conflict and contribute to a team atmosphere.

      When candidates say things like, “I prefer to work alone” or “I can hit the ground running without assistance,” I bristle. When candidates appear to know everything and everyone, I wonder if they will be receptive to learning or open to feedback. Could these statements be indications that these individuals lack interpersonal skills?

      It stands to reason, then, that interpersonal skills are among the most valuable and the bedrock of all talents and skills.

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      What are Interpersonal Skills?

      Interpersonal skills range from emotional intelligence, empathy, oral and written communication to leadership to collaboration and teamwork.

      In sum, interpersonal skills are skills that enable you to interact well with others. They include teachability and receptiveness to feedback, active or mindful listening, self-confidence and conflict resolution.

      From a communications standpoint, interpersonal skills are about understanding how colleagues prefer to communicate and then using the appropriate mediums to meet respective needs. It is about understanding how to communicate in a way to get the most out of different people.

      For instance, in my career as a public relations practitioner, part of what I am constantly evaluating is which colleagues, clients and members of the media prefer email, text or phone calls. I am assessing how much frill to use with each person depending on what has worked in the past and depending on what I know about the person with whom I am interacting.

      Making these decisions and being disciplined enough to follow each person’s known preferences helps me better connect with the various individuals in my orbit. Is this tiring at times? Yes. Is it necessary? Absolutely.

      How to Improve Interpersonal Skills

      There are tons of resources to teach interpersonal skills. I love books such as Leadership Presence by Belle Linda Halpern and Kathy Lubar, and The 5 Love Languages by Gary Chapman.

      There are also a host of books and articles on emotional intelligence, which is the ability to manage one’s emotions and perceive and adapt to others’ emotions. Emotional intelligence is likewise a critical component of positive interpersonal relations. You can learn more about it in this article: What Is Emotional Intelligence and Why It Is Important

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      Active and mindful listening also support improved interpersonal skills. I recommend you take a look at this piece: Active Listening – A Skill That Everyone Should Master

      I have further found that humility helps a ton with interpersonal skills. It takes humility to admit you have more to learn and that you can learn from the people around you. In fact, everyone with whom you interact has a lesson to teach you. And employers are increasingly looking for team members who are lifelong learners, meaning they believe there is always room for growth and professional and personal development.

      Forbes contributor Kevin H. Johnson noted in a July 2018 article,

      “That’s why, when anyone asks what the next ‘hot’ skill will be, I say it’s the same skill that will serve people today, tomorrow, and far into the future—the ability to learn.”

      Don’t overlook introspection.

      While interpersonal skills may seem simple enough, introspection is critical to learning where and in what ways you need to grow.

      Through introspection and observation, I have learned that my interpersonal skills suffer when I am sleep deprived, because then I am short-tempered and irritable. I’ve observed this connection over a significant period in my life. Unsurprisingly, it is also true of others. Fellow LifeHack contributor, health coach and personal trainer Jamie Logie noted:

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      When you are chronically sleep deprived, it really does a number on you. A lack of sleep can keep your body in a constant state of stress and over time this can get pretty ugly. Elevated stress hormones can be involved in creating a bunch of pretty nasty conditions including anxiety, headaches and dizziness, weight gain, depression, stroke, hypertension, digestive disorders, immune system dysfunction, irritability.

      Additionally, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development reported,

      “Sleep deprivation can noticeably affect people’s performance, including their ability to think clearly, react quickly, and form memories. Sleep deprivation also affects mood, leading to irritability; problems with relationships, especially for children and teenagers; and depression. Sleep deprivation can also increase anxiety.”

      The point is, even as you are identifying ways to improve interpersonal skills, think about what is getting in the way. While sleep deprivation is a trigger for me, your stumbling block may be different.

      The Bottom Line

      You cannot fix what you do not know is broken. Even as you work to understand and apply interpersonal skills, spend some time in mindful meditation to get clear on what is holding you back from developing solid relationships.

      Featured photo credit: Austin Distel via unsplash.com

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