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What Minimalism Really Means and How It Changes Everyone of Us

What Minimalism Really Means and How It Changes Everyone of Us

What is minimalism? If you think it’s only about having fewer stuff, you don’t really understand the real meaning of minimalism.

Minimalism is the idea of having the chance to pursue happiness. To live our lives fully, it’s not about acquiring more things, but following our passions and do what truly matters.

The True Meaning of Minimalism

Why the Less You Have, the More You Appreciate Yourself

Instead of focusing on whether or not an individual is fulfilling their goals, we focus too much on how much money they make and whether they catch the latest trend. But those things don’t get us more peace and happiness.

Why Minimalism Encourages Fewer Stuff and What It Really Means

When you have too many things, it’s difficult to process information and what truly matters properly.

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How We Are Recognizing the Worth of Material Things More than Their Own Worth

It doesn’t have to be giving up on all your favorite things. What minimalist living really means is recognizing your worth more than the worth of material stuff.

How Minimalism Changes Our Lives

Top 8 Benefits of Living a Minimalist Lifestyle

Minimalism creates more room for what’s important and grants us freedom to live in peace.

8 Ways Minimalism Boosts Your Work Productivity

If you can perform a task in as simple a way as possible, you become more productive and effective in problem solving.

How Good Decisions Are Made in a Minimalist Way

By streamlining your decision making, you reduce (or even eliminate) decision fatigue, and free your mind to work on the important objectives.

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How a Minimalist Style Helps You to Save More Money

Minimalist attitude is that you don’t use more than what you need. This can also help you to minimize your spending and save more.

The Contradiction Between Minimalism and Maximalism

Which One Is Better: A Minimalist Lifestyle or a Maximalist Lifestyle?

There are differences between minimalism and maximalism. But there’s no winner among these two.

How to Tell If Someone Is a Minimalist or Maximalist

Minimalism is marked by clarity and intentionality. A maximalist tend to value the gradual evolution of a space.

How to Live a Minimalist Style

How to Put Minimalism Into Action

Making small shifts is a better way to sustain a long-term perspective on being a minimalist.

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How to Think Like a Minimalist

Minimalism is a mindset and an attitude toward life. It means stopping wondering about things which aren’t necessary for you.

Go Minimalist: 6 Easy Tips for Living With 100 Items or Less

Some useful tips to help you keep less than 100 items to live a minimalist style.

Extreme Minimalism: Andrew Hyde and the 15-Item Lifestyle

If you aren’t familiar with Andrew Hyde, he’s a technology mogul and consultant, and he only owns 15 things.

Challenges Minimalists Face These Days

7 Common Struggles of Minimalist Beginners and How to Overcome Them

The struggle of wanting it, needing it, or trashing it is real.

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Getting Rid of Stuff Is Just the First Step, Understanding Your Identity Is the Hard Part

Deciding to be a minimalist is a massive change. It’s about more than just getting rid of stuff, but identifying who you are.

Minimalist Role Models for Everyone

10 Wealthy and Successful People Who Choose Less Over More

Following the philosophy “less is more”, these minimalists succeed both in their business and personal life.

Highly Productive and Successful People Who Are Also Minimalists

By going minimalist, these successful people successfully reduce decision fatigue and achieve more out of less.

Featured photo credit: Stock Snap via stocksnap.io

More by this author

Anna Chui

Anna is a communication expert and a life enthusiast. She's the Content Strategist of Lifehack and loves to write about love, life, and passion.

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Last Updated on August 10, 2020

Is Avoiding Difficult Tasks And Doing Easy Tasks First Less Productive?

Is Avoiding Difficult Tasks And Doing Easy Tasks First Less Productive?

Procrastination is probably the biggest detriment to our productivity. Conventional wisdom dictates that the best thing you can do is make that procrastination constructive. When you don’t feel like doing one task, usually one that requires a lot of will- or brainpower, you do another, usually less labor-intensive task.

Recently, though, conventional wisdom has been challenged with something Penn State refers to as “pre-crastination.”[1] After doing a series of studies in which students pick up and carry one of two buckets, researchers theorized that many people prefer to take care of difficult tasks sooner rather than later. That theory poses the question of whether this pre-crastination or the more widely acknowledged constructive procrastination is more effective.

Here is a look at whether people should do difficult tasks early or later on to achieve maximum productivity.

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Doing Easy Tasks First

The Pros

One of the hardest parts of working is just getting started. Constructive procrastination eases this hardship, because working on easy tasks requires a smaller mental or physical commitment than if you tackled difficult tasks firsts.

If one of the foremost deterrents to your productivity is simply getting going, it makes a lot of sense to save the difficult tasks for when you’re in more of a groove.

The Cons

If you eat a frog first thing in the morning, that will probably be the worst thing you do all day. — Mark Twain

On the surface, there don’t seem to necessarily be any disadvantages to doing easy tasks first. However, in Eat That Frog, the book writeen by Brian Tracy challenges that.

Based on the above quote from Mark Twain, Eat That Frog encourages avoiding procrastination, even if that procrastination is constructive. Tracy wants you to “eat that frog,” i.e. do your difficult tasks quickly because the longer it’s on your plate, the harder it will become to do the thing you’re dreading. If you have a habit of dreading things, Eat That Frog makes a solid argument to hold off on your easy tasks until later in the day.

Doing Difficult Tasks First

The Pros

Brian Tracy postulates in Eat That Frog that if you do your difficult tasks first, your other tasks won’t seem so bad. After all, after you eat a frog, even something unappetizing will seem downright delectable.

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Tracy also recommends that, if you have to eat two frogs, you should eat the uglier one first. The metaphor is a very easy way to get your head around the new concept of pre-crastination.

If all of your tasks seem somewhat torturous to you, you might be able to ease the pain by getting rid of the ugliest “toads” as quickly as you can.

The Cons

The primary disadvantage of doing your difficult tasks first is probably that it will make it especially hard to get started on your workday.

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A lot of people aren’t exactly at their peak performance mode when they enter the office. They need to ease into the workday, maybe have a cup or two of coffee to stimulate them.

If that’s you, doing your most difficult tasks first would probably be a costly mistake. Hold off on “eating those frogs” until you have the willpower and fortitude to choke them down.

Conclusion

Should you do easy or difficult tasks first? It seems like a cop-out to say that it depends on the person, but sometimes that’s the honest answer, and that is definitely the case here.

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Hopefully this article helps inform you of what type of worker you are, offering clues to whether you fall into the constructive procrastination or pre-crastination camps. Good luck on your pursuit of maximum productivity!

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Featured photo credit: Courtney Dirks via flickr.com

Reference

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