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Last Updated on September 12, 2018

How to Get Motivated to Work and Start off Your Day with Positivity

How to Get Motivated to Work and Start off Your Day with Positivity

Mustering enough motivation to show up at work every day is a common problem…no matter if you love or hate your job. If you hate your job, it goes without saying that finding the motivation to show-up is not easy.  But you’ll also find that even if you love your job, there are mornings where you’re clawing at the walls to get out of bed.

So how to get motivated to work?

It’s easy to fall into a rut and get stuck in the same ho-hum routine. and inevitably, the excitement for work diminishes. However, if you consistently motivate yourself to show up at work every day, you’ll experience:

  • Increased energy levels to get the work done.
  • More enthusiasm to attack challenges as they arise.
  • Better sustained results over the long haul.

Motivation That Doesn’t Work

If showing up at work every day were easy, everyone would be doing it. And it wouldn’t be costing businesses $84 Billion a year.[1] Part of the issue though is that organizations attempt to motivate you with:

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  • bonuses
  • promotions
  • attendance awards
  • company luaus
  • virtual dog shows
  • pizza

Not to say it’s necessary to do away with these incentives entirely, but organizations are missing a massive opportunity to provide you with the tools to motivate yourself to show up at work.

What Really Works to Motivate You to Work

So, instead of depending on the organization to find motivation, here are 3 ways to motivate you to show up at work everyday.

1. Remind Yourself “Why” You Work

Too often, employees base their motivation on external sources like accolades, bonuses, and job promotion. Sure, these feel good but they’re just a “sugar high” and don’t last.

Consider your own motivation as something that’s internally sourced.  The simplest way to identify this internal sources of motivation is to find your own personal reason “why.”  Why motivates for the long haul. For example, maybe you’re heading to work on Monday to appease the boss, lay the groundwork for a raise,  or just get through a project that’s been hanging over your head for awhile.

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It’s a lot like losing weight for a class reunion or a beach trip.  While both are definitely motivating factors to lose weight, it’s usually not sustained over the the long term.

Consider how your work day motivation changes when you think about the example you want to set for your kids, how you want to help your your co-workers that you’ve been with for years or how you believe in  overall mission in your company.

Or simply, you believe that the job you’re doing helps you learn and prepare for the next step in your career. Those are deeper, more meaningful reasons to motivate to show up at work.

2. Use the Hemingway Technique

Nothing helps your work day motivation like momentum and Ernest Hemingway had a brilliant approach. His technique was to leave the last chapter or paragraph unfinished at the end of day especially when he knew exactly how it was going to end.

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Then when he sat down at his desk the following day, he could immediately start writing and build momentum for the rest of his day. He’d never find himself at his desk wondering what to do next.

You can apply this technique to your work day motivation. Instead of staying late on Friday or working over the weekend to wrap up your work, pick a stopping place strategically, so when you get to work on Monday, you know exactly what to do next. This type of momentum will carry you through your work day.

3. Take Control

It’s so easy to let your first few hours of your work fill-up with meetings. Take control by planning and scheduling your first few interactions of the day so you’re looking forward to them.

Set up a coffee meeting or a conference call with someone at the office who is typically upbeat and creative. This is a low stress way to motivate because it just involves showing up…and a little bit of planning.

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You can also gain motivation by connecting with your family at home. In my family, we often plan breakfast together and hold our own little breakfast party. It really helps us get our day started off right in every positive way and the motivational momentum we get carries over into work (and school).

Take one of the tips above and adopt it for your weekly routine.  Here’s to being motivated!

Featured photo credit: Berkeley Communications via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Ben Fanning

Ben is a Burnout Specialist. He helps frustrated executives and teams rekindle their passion for their careers.

How to Get Motivated to Work and Start off Your Day with Positivity 14 Ways To Be A Better Boss From A Corporate Survivor

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Last Updated on February 13, 2019

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

10 Things Happy People Do Differently

Think being happy is something that happens as a result of luck, circumstance, having money, etc.? Think again.

Happiness is a mindset. And if you’re looking to improve your ability to find happiness, then check out these 10 things happy people do differently.

Happiness is not something ready made. It comes from your own actions. -Dalai Lama

1. Happy people find balance in their lives.

Folks who are happy have this in common: they’re content with what they have, and don’t waste a whole lot of time worrying and stressing over things they don’t. Unhappy people do the opposite: they spend too much time thinking about what they don’t have. Happy people lead balanced lives. This means they make time for all the things that are important to them, whether it’s family, friends, career, health, religion, etc.

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2. Happy people abide by the golden rule.

You know that saying you heard when you were a kid, “Do unto others as you would have them do to you.” Well, happy people truly embody this principle. They treat others with respect. They’re sensitive to the thoughts and feelings of other people. They’re compassionate. And they get treated this way (most of the time) in return.

3. Happy people don’t sweat the small stuff.

One of the biggest things happy people do differently compared to unhappy people is they let stuff go. Bad things happen to good people sometimes. Happy people realize this, are able to take things in stride, and move on. Unhappy people tend to dwell on minor inconveniences and issues, which can perpetuate feelings of sadness, guilt, resentment, greed, and anger.

4. Happy people take responsibility for their actions.

Happy people aren’t perfect, and they’re well aware of that. When they screw up, they admit it. They recognize their faults and work to improve on them. Unhappy people tend to blame others and always find an excuse why things aren’t going their way. Happy people, on the other hand, live by the mantra:

“There are two types of people in the world: those that do and those that make excuses why they don’t.”

5. Happy people surround themselves with other happy people.

happiness surrounding

    One defining characteristic of happy people is they tend to hang out with other happy people. Misery loves company, and unhappy people gravitate toward others who share their negative sentiments. If you’re struggling with a bout of sadness, depression, worry, or anger, spend more time with your happiest friends or family members. Chances are, you’ll find that their positive attitude rubs off on you.

    6. Happy people are honest with themselves and others.

    People who are happy often exhibit the virtues of honesty and trustworthiness. They would rather give you candid feedback, even when the truth hurts, and they expect the same in return. Happy people respect people who give them an honest opinion.

    7. Happy people show signs of happiness.

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    smile

      This one may sound obvious but it’s a key differentiator between happy and unhappy people. Think about your happiest friends. Chances are, the mental image you form is of them smiling, laughing, and appearing genuinely happy. On the flip side, those who aren’t happy tend to look the part. Their posture may be slouched and you may perceive a lack of confidence.

      8. Happy people are passionate.

      Another thing happy people have in common is their ability to find their passions in life and pursue those passions to the fullest. Happy people have found what they’re looking for, and they spend their time doing what they love.

      9. Happy people see challenges as opportunities.

      Folks who are happy accept challenges and use them as opportunities to learn and grow. They turn negatives into positives and make the best out of seemingly bad situations. They don’t dwell on things that are out of their control; rather, they seek solutions and creative ways of overcoming obstacles.

      10. Happy people live in the present.

      While unhappy people tend to dwell on the past and worry about the future, happy people live in the moment. They are grateful for “the now” and focus their efforts on living life to the fullest in the present. Their philosophy is:

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      There’s a reason it’s called “the present.” Because life is a gift.

      So if you’d like to bring a little more happiness into your life, think about the 10 principles above and how you can use them to make yourself better.

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