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Last Updated on September 12, 2018

How to Get Motivated to Work and Start off Your Day with Positivity

How to Get Motivated to Work and Start off Your Day with Positivity

Mustering enough motivation to show up at work every day is a common problem…no matter if you love or hate your job. If you hate your job, it goes without saying that finding the motivation to show-up is not easy.  But you’ll also find that even if you love your job, there are mornings where you’re clawing at the walls to get out of bed.

So how to get motivated to work?

It’s easy to fall into a rut and get stuck in the same ho-hum routine. and inevitably, the excitement for work diminishes. However, if you consistently motivate yourself to show up at work every day, you’ll experience:

  • Increased energy levels to get the work done.
  • More enthusiasm to attack challenges as they arise.
  • Better sustained results over the long haul.

Motivation That Doesn’t Work

If showing up at work every day were easy, everyone would be doing it. And it wouldn’t be costing businesses $84 Billion a year.[1] Part of the issue though is that organizations attempt to motivate you with:

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  • bonuses
  • promotions
  • attendance awards
  • company luaus
  • virtual dog shows
  • pizza

Not to say it’s necessary to do away with these incentives entirely, but organizations are missing a massive opportunity to provide you with the tools to motivate yourself to show up at work.

What Really Works to Motivate You to Work

So, instead of depending on the organization to find motivation, here are 3 ways to motivate you to show up at work everyday.

1. Remind Yourself “Why” You Work

Too often, employees base their motivation on external sources like accolades, bonuses, and job promotion. Sure, these feel good but they’re just a “sugar high” and don’t last.

Consider your own motivation as something that’s internally sourced.  The simplest way to identify this internal sources of motivation is to find your own personal reason “why.”  Why motivates for the long haul. For example, maybe you’re heading to work on Monday to appease the boss, lay the groundwork for a raise,  or just get through a project that’s been hanging over your head for awhile.

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It’s a lot like losing weight for a class reunion or a beach trip.  While both are definitely motivating factors to lose weight, it’s usually not sustained over the the long term.

Consider how your work day motivation changes when you think about the example you want to set for your kids, how you want to help your your co-workers that you’ve been with for years or how you believe in  overall mission in your company.

Or simply, you believe that the job you’re doing helps you learn and prepare for the next step in your career. Those are deeper, more meaningful reasons to motivate to show up at work.

2. Use the Hemingway Technique

Nothing helps your work day motivation like momentum and Ernest Hemingway had a brilliant approach. His technique was to leave the last chapter or paragraph unfinished at the end of day especially when he knew exactly how it was going to end.

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Then when he sat down at his desk the following day, he could immediately start writing and build momentum for the rest of his day. He’d never find himself at his desk wondering what to do next.

You can apply this technique to your work day motivation. Instead of staying late on Friday or working over the weekend to wrap up your work, pick a stopping place strategically, so when you get to work on Monday, you know exactly what to do next. This type of momentum will carry you through your work day.

3. Take Control

It’s so easy to let your first few hours of your work fill-up with meetings. Take control by planning and scheduling your first few interactions of the day so you’re looking forward to them.

Set up a coffee meeting or a conference call with someone at the office who is typically upbeat and creative. This is a low stress way to motivate because it just involves showing up…and a little bit of planning.

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You can also gain motivation by connecting with your family at home. In my family, we often plan breakfast together and hold our own little breakfast party. It really helps us get our day started off right in every positive way and the motivational momentum we get carries over into work (and school).

Take one of the tips above and adopt it for your weekly routine.  Here’s to being motivated!

Featured photo credit: Berkeley Communications via unsplash.com

Reference

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Ben Fanning

Ben is a Burnout Specialist. He helps frustrated executives and teams rekindle their passion for their careers.

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Last Updated on June 24, 2019

Why Social Media Might Be Causing Depression

Why Social Media Might Be Causing Depression

A study [1] published in Depression and Anxiety found that social media users are more likely to be depressed. This was just one of the huge number of studies linking social media and depression[2] . But why exactly do platforms like Facebook and Instagram make people so unhappy? Well, we don’t know yet for sure, but there are some explanations.

Social Media Could Lead to Depression

Depression is a serious medical condition that affects how you think, feel, and behave. Social media may lead to depression in predisposed individuals or make existing symptoms of depression[3] worse explains[4] the study above’s senior author Dr. Brian Primack. So, the problem may not be in social media per se, but how we use it.

Signs You’re Suffering From “Social Media Depression”

If you feel like social media is having a negative impact on your mood, then you may be suffering from “social media depression.” Look for symptoms like:

• low self-esteem,

• negative self-talk,

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• a low mood,

• irritability,

• a lack of interest in activities once enjoyed,

• and social withdrawal.

If you’ve had these symptoms for more than two weeks and if this is how you feel most of the time, then you are likely depressed. Although “social media depression “is not a term recognized in the medical setting, social media depression seems to be a real phenomenon affecting around 50% of social media users. As explained in a review study[5] published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, if a person has a certain predisposition to depression and other mental disorders, social media use may only worsen their mental health.

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Social Media Could Crush Self-Esteem

We know that social media and depression are in some way linked, but why is this so? Well, according to Igor Pantic, MD, Ph.D.[6], social media use skews your perception about other people’s lives and traits. To explain this further, most people like to portray an idealized image of their lives, personal traits, and appearance on sites like Facebook and Instagram. If you confuse this idealized image with reality, you may be under the false impression that everyone is better than you which can crush your self-esteem and lead to depression. This is especially true for teens and young adults who are more likely to compare themselves to others. If you already suffer from low self-esteem, the illusion that everyone has it better off than you will just make you feel worse.

Causing Social Isolation and Other Negative Emotions

Another commonly cited reason for the negative impact of social media on mental health is its link with social isolation. Depressed people are more likely to isolate themselves socially and chose only to interact indirectly through social media platforms. But communication online tends to be superficial and is lacking when compared to real-life interaction explains Panic. What this means is not that social media leads to isolation but the other way around, possibly explaining why we find so many depressed persons on these sites.

Lastly, social media use may generate negative emotions in you like envy, jealousy, dislike, loneliness, and many others and this may worsen your depressive symptoms.

Why We Need to Take This Seriously

Both depression and social media use are on the rise according to epidemiological studies. Since each one has an impact on the other, we have to start thinking of healthier ways to use social media. Teens and young adults are especially vulnerable to the negative impact of social media on mental health.

Advice on Social Media Use

Although these findings did not provide any cause-effect explanation regarding Facebook and depression[7], they still do prove that social media use may not be a good way to handle depression. For this reason, the leading authors of these studies gave some suggestions as to how clinicians and people can make use of such findings.

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One suggestion is that clinicians should ask patients about their social media habits. Then they can advise them on how to change their outlook on social media use or even suggest limiting their time spent on social media.

Some social media users may also exhibit addictive behavior; they may spend too much time due to compulsive urges. Any compulsive behavior is bound to lead to feelings of guilt which can worsen depressive symptoms.

Having Unhealthy Relationship with Social Media

If you feel like your relationship with social media is unhealthy, then consider the advice on healthy social media use provided by psychology experts from Links Psychology[8]:

Avoid negative social comparison – always keep in mind that how people portray themselves and their lives on social media is not a realistic picture, but rather an idealized one. Also, avoid comparing yourself to others because this behavior can lead to negative self-talk.

Remember that social media is not a replacement for real life – Social media is great for staying in touch and having fun, but it should never replace real-world interactions.

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Avoid releasing personal information – For your safety and privacy, make sure to be careful with what you post online.

Report users who bully and harass you – It’s easy to be a bully in the anonymous and distant world of social media. Don’t take such offense personally and report those who abuse social media to harass others.

The bits of advice listed above can help you establish a healthy relationship with social media. Always keep these things in mind to avoid losing an objective perspective of what social media is and how it is different from real life. If you are currently suffering from depression, talk to your doctor about what is bothering you so that you can get the treatment you need to get better. Tell your doctor about your social media use and see if they could give you some advice on this topic.

Reference

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