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3 Ways to Motivate You to Show Up at Work Everyday

3 Ways to Motivate You to Show Up at Work Everyday

Mustering enough motivation to show up at work every day is a common problem…no matter if you love or hate your job. If you hate your job it goes without saying that finding the motivation to show-up is not easy.  But you’ll also find that even if you love your job, there are mornings where you’re clawing at the walls to get out of bed.

It’s easy to fall into a rut and get stuck in the same ho-hum routine. and inevitably, the excitement for work diminishes. However, if you consistently motivate yourself to show up at work every day, you’ll experience:

  • Increased energy levels to get the work done.
  • More enthusiasm to attack challenges as they arise.
  • Better sustained results over the long haul.

Motivation to Show up at Work?

If showing up at work every day were easy, everyone would be doing it. And it wouldn’t be costing businesses $84 Billion a year. Part of the issue though is that organizations attempt to motivate you with:

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  • bonuses
  • promotions
  • attendance awards
  • company luaus
  • virtual dog shows
  • pizza

Not to say it’s necessary to do away with these incentives entirely, but organizations are missing a massive opportunity to provide you with the tools to motivate yourself to show up at work.   So, instead of depending on the organization to find motivation, here are 3 ways to motivate you to show up at work everyday.

1. Remind Yourself “Why” You Work

Too often, employees base their motivation on external sources like accolades, bonuses, and job promotion. Sure, these feel good but they’re just a “sugar high” and don’t last.

Consider your own motivation as something that’s internally sourced.  The simplest way to identify this internal sources of motivation is to find your own personal reason “why.”  Why motivates for the long haul. For example, maybe you’re heading to work on Monday to appease the boss, lay the groundwork for a raise,  or just get through a project that’s been hanging over your head for awhile.

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It’s a lot like losing weight for a class reunion or a beach trip.  While both are definitely motivating factors to lose weight, it’s usually not sustained over the the long term.

Consider how your work day motivation changes when you think about the example you want to set for your kids, how you want to help your your co-workers that you’ve been with for years or how you believe in  overall mission in your company. Or simply, you believe that the job you’re doing helps you learn and prepare for the next step in your career. Those are deeper, more meaningful reasons to motivate to show up at work.

2. Use the Hemingway Technique

Nothing helps your work day motivation like momentum and Ernest Hemingway had a brilliant approach. His technique was to leave the last chapter or paragraph unfinished at the end of day especially when he knew exactly how it was going to end. Then when he sat down at his desk the following day, he could immediately start writing and build momentum for the rest of his day.  He’d never find himself at his desk wondering what to do next.

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You can apply this technique to your work day motivation. Instead of staying late on Friday or working over the weekend to wrap up your work, pick a stopping place strategically, so when you get to work on Monday, you know exactly what to do next. This type of momentum will carry you through your work day.

3. Take Control

It’s so easy to let your first few hours of your work fill-up with meetings.  Take control by planning and scheduling your first few interactions of the day so you’re looking forward to them. Set up a coffee meeting or a conference call with someone at the office who is typically upbeat and creative. This is a low stress way to motivate because it just involves showing up…and a little bit of planning.

You can also gain motivation by connecting with your family at home. In my family, we often plan breakfast together and hold our own little breakfast party. It really helps us get our day started off right in every positive way and the motivational momentum we get carries over into work (and school).

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Take one of the tips above and adopt it for your weekly routine.  Here’s to being motivated!

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Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

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How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

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Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

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The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

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9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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