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How to Succeed with Integrity in a Competitive Workplace

How to Succeed with Integrity in a Competitive Workplace

When you work in a competitive environment, you’re going to have to leap over more than a few hurdles. You may have to deal with arrogant bosses, employee politics, rampant discrimination, and cruel intimidation in order to survive a potentially hostile workplace. But don’t worry—you can rise above it all. Separate yourself from the negativity and preserve your integrity by investing in your own success above all else.

1. Strive for excellence.

“Great ambition is the passion of a great character. Those endowed with it may perform very good or very bad acts. All depends on the principles which direct them.”

—Napoleon Bonaparte

Take care to act upon your ambition, and let your principles be your guide. Do not just talk about what you are going to do. (In fact, avoid needless conversations with others about your career goals altogether.) The people you work with will twist your words around, especially if you cannot deliver on your promises. So make promises to yourself—and then keep them. Your actions will speak volumes to those around you. Once you’ve shown your co-workers what you can do, they will respect you for your ability to show up for the tasks at hand.

Learn from your mistakes. Should you make an error, do not allow yourself to get dragged down to the level of obnoxious co-workers. Ignore their comments about your mistakes, and learn from the errors you make. Any mistake can be converted into a learning experience if you take the time to explore what happened. And if others make mistakes, be sure to give them the space to learn as well. It’s not worth your energy to taunt them about their own errors—as an ambitious person, you simply don’t have time for that.

Put forth the effort on every project, aim for what you believe is right, and be proud of what you do. Your passion and persistence will move you up the ranks in a competitive workplace, especially if you perform with integrity and tact. You define the measurement of your own success: the only person you have to please is yourself.

2. Build and rebuild your reputation.

“Character isn’t inherited. One builds it daily by the way one thinks and acts, thought by thought, action by action. If one lets fear or hate or anger take possession of the mind, they become self-forged chains.”

—Helen Gahagan Douglas

It is up to you to begin forging strong bonds with your impressions among your co-workers. If you are starting a new job, then it is pretty easy. Simply present yourself in the best light from day one. If you hit the ground running, your reputation among your colleagues will grow naturally.

But what if you’ve been working with a corporation for many years? Well, it may be time to rebuild your reputation. Let go of pride for a spell, and find what needs within the company you can fulfill with your skill set. If you continue to cultivate these strengths, your co-workers will certainly appreciate exactly what value you bring to the company. From there, you can start to build other skills that will further raise your profile within the corporation—and that is something you can be proud of.

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Your reputation among your colleagues will grow with each of your successes. Your employer will trust you with more responsibilities. Others will look to you for advice on the way up: feel free to give it. Remind them, however, that there is no better teacher than learning from your mistakes.

If you take the time to cultivate your character on the path to success, you will inevitably preserve your reputation in the process.

3. Roll with the punches.

“I am glad that I paid so little attention to good advice; had I abided by it I might have been saved from some of my most valuable mistakes.”

—Edna St. Vincent Millay

Practice successful recoveries. Every time you make a mistake, look for the opportunity to learn.

Oftentimes in the workplace, an error could cost you: perhaps you will be demoted (or worse, fired.) In these cases, be sure to mourn your losses. Blow off a little steam, talk to a confidant or mentor, or take a well-deserved vacation. Set a time limit on your period of grief, however. Once you have allowed the moment to pass, roll with the punches.

You will be glad for the break. It will allow you to take an objective look at what happened, how you can regroup, and how you can avoid making the same mistake twice. If you have to look for a new job, don’t be afraid. Just put your best foot forward and rely upon those skills you’ve been cultivating. Champion your successes to the world and you’ll advance your career.

If you are returning to the same workplace after a hiatus, you’ll be ready to face everyone you work with. Your co-workers and employers will be impressed by your ability to rebound, and they will respect you all the more. Also, they will recognize that you are a human just like them. More often than not, they’re going to be delighted to have you back.

Find strength in your mistakes, and bounce back twice as high.

4. Respect others’ differences.

“The only difference between man and man all the world over is one of degree, and not of kind, even as there is between trees of the same species. Where in is the cause for anger, envy or discrimination?”

—Mahatma Gandhi

Nowadays, you can find many diverse cultures and beliefs in the workplace. Many times the manifestation of these differences can be a beautiful, natural part of belonging to an organization. In other times, the closed-minded natures of some co-workers can be difficult to navigate. Be sure to practice openness to what others believe, and do not seek to impress your own beliefs on your colleagues.

Let it be said: there are monsters in the workplace: misogynists, bigots, racists, narcissists, sociopaths, autocrats, and other types of ignorant miscreants. This is just a fact of life: people are the way they are. People of this ilk are not easily avoided in the workplace, so you must learn to let them be. Free yourself of whatever negativity they may conjure up within you, and focus merely on the work at hand. Let your successes tell your story, and remind yourself that a nasty person is often simply jealous of your ability to thrive.

Politics tell a similar story, but can be harder to deal with. Try to be happy for those who are celebrated for their worth. Sometimes, however, the office jerk gets to move up the ranks—don’t let it get you down. You will have your day. What’s more, since you measure yourself by your own achievements, you can be proud of what you do. Keep on rising above the mundane, and your co-workers will continue to want to see you grow. And don’t get involved in gossip—you are better than that.

Lead by example when it comes to politics. Diversity is meant to be celebrated in the workplace.

5. Foster healthy relationships.

“When we dislike someone, or feel threatened by someone, the natural tendency is to focus on something we dislike about the person, something that irritates us. Unfortunately, when we do this—instead of seeing the deeper beauty of the person and giving them energy—we take energy away and actually do them harm. All they know is that they suddenly feel less beautiful and less confident, and it is because we sapped their energy.”

—James Redfield, The Celestine Prophecy

Learn to work around those who are difficult, and praise those who you enjoy working with. It’s a healthy habit to look for the good in people: we’re not all that different after all. Everyone wants things to go smoothly in the workplace, so keep that in mind when the going gets tough.

For whatever reason, you may find that one or more of your colleagues do not like you. Don’t pander to them. You don’t have to please the people you work with, you just have to perform your job well. You may discover that there are like-minded individuals in your workplace: cultivate your working relationships with these people instead of squandering your focus on “how things should be.” By aligning yourself with the right kind of workers, you will be able to do more with your time and energy.

The higher-ups will undoubtedly appreciate your ability to work well with others and when it comes time to promote you, they will sing your praises as well.

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6. Go with the flow, and then go against it.

“It is better to lead from behind and to put others in front, especially when you celebrate victory when nice things occur. You take the front line when there is danger. Then people will appreciate your leadership.”

—Nelson Mandela

Always get a sense of the room when starting out. Your co-workers may be invested in their own projects, which is good—let them be. At other times, you may find your colleagues would rather laze away the day, or fester in foul moods. In these moments, break away from the bad habits and forge your own path.

In a project-oriented environment, always seek to discover the best way to further the task at hand. Are you the best suited individual for it? Maybe you need to ask for a little help on this one. Don’t be afraid to admit your weaknesses! This is a prime example where going with the flow will help you: allow everyone the opportunity to meet the needs of the company so that the overall project doesn’t suffer. Support those who want a little more responsibility too. Sometimes you have to let go of your ego so that the collective can thrive.

There will be moments when you know you have the right idea, though, and it seems like no one is listening. These are the times when you must take the bull by the horns. You will have to be assertive: share your groundbreaking ideas with the project manager or the entire team in the proper moment. This could mean having a pow-wow with her in her office, or it could mean that you should bring up your idea in a meeting. Whatever the case, gauge the public response to your suggestion beforehand and employ tact in the way you present it.

It’s important to know when to follow the flow, and when it’s right to break tradition.

7. Compete with class.

“He who angers you conquers you.”

—Sister Elizabeth Kenny

Competition is a good thing, and you should learn to love it. This doesn’t mean always winning, this means always doing your best.

When you compete with others in the workplace, think about that reputation you’ve been building. Others may want to put you down, to see you fail. Let them participate in a challenge how they want to, but if they play rough, you don’t necessarily have to play along. Think about how you will go about competing and what it will mean for your growth in the long run.

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Sometimes your co-workers (or your boss) will try to intimidate you. I’ve heard many stories about employers or colleagues who utilize horrible tactics to get what they want. Some of your co-workers might not want you to get the raise you deserve, so they’ll spread lies about you. A manager might threaten to suspend or fire you if you don’t agree to work grueling hours. Or maybe your team wants you to take the fall for a failed project. Don’t crumple under the pressure.

The answer, as always, is to rise above their intimidation. Let the facts of your work speak for themselves. If you have to, confront the person who is trying to intimidate you, and do it in private if you can. Perhaps you will have to do what is being asked of you, but at least you have made your stance known. And you can always voice your opinion through the proper channels. Never forget that you also have legal rights as an employee—if anyone ever harasses you thereby compromising your ability to work, don’t be afraid to blow the whistle on them if necessary.

Remember that you are an asset to your company, so maintain your integrity and you will triumph.

8. Make a lifestyle, not a living.

“A career is wonderful, but you can’t curl up with it on a cold night.”

—Marilyn Monroe

Life is about your journey in the world, and your career is just a slice of your experience. There are so many wonderful places to visit, events to enjoy, and people to meet. Your career is not the end-all be-all of your existence!

Therefore, set aside plenty of time outside of work to cultivate yourself. For example, you could start up a new hobby, watch indy movies, go out on dates, take trips, meet up with like-minded groups of people, grow your investments, and participate in the gazillion sorts of activities in your community—and around the world!

A life spent in service to a corporation will provide you with a regular salary and plenty of work experience. Beyond that, there is very little that a long career will bring you in your twilight years. Strive to develop a balance between your career and your life outside of work.

Your extra-curricular experiences will make you more cultured and happy, and the competitive environment you work in won’t seem so difficult to navigate. Your passion for life will shine both in your work community and outside of it. And you will be pleased with your successes because you didn’t pander to the competition—you rose above it all.

Featured photo credit: taylorward89/Photopin via flickr.com

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Last Updated on May 22, 2019

50 Great People To Follow On LinkedIn, No Matter Your Industry

50 Great People To Follow On LinkedIn, No Matter Your Industry

LinkedIn is an excellent platform to network with great people to help you in your career and businesses. However, with over 575 million people on the site, who should you follow? This list will steer you to the right people to follow, organized by categories of expertise.

Job Search Experts

You will likely have several jobs throughout the course of your career, and you will constantly need advice on new trends and strategies out there in the job market. Here are the LinkedIn experts who you should follow on these matters.

1. Liz Ryan is the CEO and founder of Human Workplace. Her articles on job searching are filled with creative and colorful cartoons.

2. Lou Adler is the author of The Essential Guide for Hiring and Getting Hired.

3. Dr. Marla Gottschalk will help you make an impact in a new job.

4. Hannah Morgan runs CareerSherpa.net, where she gives expert advice on job searching and how to be more visible online.

5. Alison Doyle is the CEO and Founder of CareerToolBelt.com.

Management Experts

They say that people leave managers, not jobs. These experts in LinkedIn will help you become your employees’ dream manager.

6. Jeff Weiner. How can we leave out the CEO of LinkedIn himself?

7. Nozomi Morgan is an executive coach. She can help you transition from a boss to a true leader.

8. Mickey Mikitani is the CEO of Rakuten. He constantly shares his expertise in managing a global player in e-commerce platforms.

9. Andreas von der Heydt was the head of Amazon’s Kindle Content and now the Director of Talent Acquisition. He has extensive experience in management, branding, and marketing.

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Productivity Experts

By maximizing your productivity, you can win in all aspects of life. The following LinkedIn experts will help you win big in your career.

10. Gretchen Rubin is a happiness coach and the bestselling author of the The Happiness Project.

11. Carson Tate is the founder of Working Simply. She advises us to include play in our schedules.

12. Greg Mckeown is an essentialist. Part of being an essentialist is saying no to many things so that we can focus on the things that matter.

13. Brian de Haaff, CEO of Aha! Labs Inc. provides strategies on how to be productive and happy at work at the same time.

Marketing Experts

14. Sujan Patel is VP of Marketing at When I Work, an employee scheduling software. He is an expert in content marketing and he even shares his ideas on content marketing in 2020.

15. Megan Berry is the Head of Product Development at Rebelmouse, a content marketing and AlwaysOn powerhouse.

16. Sean Gardner will help you navigate the social media landscape. This includes how to use different platforms to help accelerate your career. He is also the bestselling author of The Road to Social Media Success.

17. Christel Quek is an digital and marketing expert. She is the VP of South East Asia at Brandwatch. Their products help businesses utilize social media data to make better business decisions.

18. Jeff Bullas is a digital marketing expert. His blog has over 4 million readers annually.

19. Michael Stelzer is the CEO and Founder of social media powerhouse site, Social Media Examiner.

20. If you’re looking for inbound and content marketing expertise, follow Dharmesh Shah, Founder and CTO of Hubspot.

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21. David Edelman is a McKinsey partner and is at the helm of the Digital Marketing Strategy Practice Department.

22. Dave Kerpen leads the social media software company Likeable Local. He is the author of Likeable Social Media: How to delight your customers.

23. Clara Shih is the CEO of Hearsay Social and the author of The Facebook Era.

24. Aaron Lee is Grand Master of Customer Delight at Post Planner. He is an excellent resource for everything social media.

25. David Sable is the CEO of Y&R, one of the largest advertising firms in the world.

26. Content marketing trumps traditional marketing these days, and who else better to lead you in this area than Joe Pulizzi, Founder of Content Marketing Institute.

Personal Branding Experts

Part of what we market in our personal career is our brand. When people hear your name, what kind of brand comes into their mind? What traits and qualities do they associate with you?

Here are some personal branding experts from LinkedIn to improve your own brand.

27. Dorie Clark is the author of Stand Out and Reinventing You. He can help you craft the professional image you’ve always wanted.

28. Dan Schawbel is the managing partner of Millennial Branding. If you’re a millennial, Dan is the guy to help you craft your personal brand.

Other Notable Experts to Follow

29. Lisa Gates is the expert to follow if you’re negotiating for higher salaries and promotions.

30. If you’re a Baby Boomer, Marc Miller will help you navigate the continually changing landscape of the workplace.

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31. To avoid getting your resumé moved to the “No” pile, read Paul Freiberger’s excellent advice.

32. James Caan provides insightful ideas on careers in general. He is also a serial entrepreneur.

33. Jeff Haden writes on various topics, such as leadership and management. He is the owner of Blackbird Media.

34. If you’re looking for expert business advice on getting new customers and keeping them, follow Jay Baer.

35. Suzanne Lucas, aka Evil HR Lady, is a great human resources specialist.

36. If you need help in using Twitter to boost your career, Claire Diaz-Ortiz can guide you in the right direction.

37. Ryan Holmes is the CEO of Hootsuite, a social media management tool.

38. Customers are the lifeblood of a business and Colin Shaw focuses on revolutionizing this customer experience.

39. Brian Solis often reflects on the future of business and how technology can disrupt our world.

40. Nancy Lublin provides advice on more lighthearted topics, which are perfect after a long day’s work. She is the CEO behind Dosomething.org, a portal designed for social change; and the founder & CEO of Loris.ai and Crisis Text Line.

41. Katya Andresen provides advice on how to manage your career. She was the CEO of Cricket Media and now responsible for the SVP Card Customer Experience at Capital One.

42. Gallup has created a system to test what your strengths are and how to use them at work. Jim Clifton is the CEO of Gallup.

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43. Adam Grant is a Wharton Professor and the author of Give and Take, which provides advice on why being helpful at work can accelerate your career.

44. Hunter Walk is a partner at Homebrew Venture Capitalist Company and has specialty in product development and management.

45. If you’re running a nonprofit organization, follow Beth Kanter for expert advice on this area.

46. Emotional Intelligence is necessary to succeed in your career, and Daniel Goleman is your expert for that.

47. Rita J. King connects science, technology and business.

48. Tori Worthington Rose is a Creative Director at Mary Beth West Communications, LLC. She has extensive experience in sales and digital media.

49. If you’re looking for some advice on how to use writing and personal content marketing to boost your career, follow Ann Handley.

50. Tim Brown is the CEO at IDEO and shares his insights on Leadership and Creativity.

These are just some of the key thought leaders and movers in various industries. They will provide you with constant inspiration, as well as the willpower to pursue the career that you’ve always wanted. Their stream of expert ideas in their respective fields will help you become well-equipped in your professional pursuits.

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Featured photo credit: LinkedIn Sales Navigator via unsplash.com

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