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How to Give a Presentation Like a Pro

How to Give a Presentation Like a Pro

The usual approach when preparing a presentation is putting the points into slides. But the best presentations do not seek to merely inform. They make a lasting mark. Martin Luther King’s 1963 “I Have A Dream” speech inspired a nation to reconsider their assumptions around race and social justice. Ronald Reagan’s speech in Berlin, delivered in 1987, wasn’t an objective remark on historical events. It was a passionate plea, an attempt to hasten the tearing down of the Berlin Wall. Neither will be remembered for their PowerPoint presentations, but for their heartfelt messages.

Treat a presentation like a drama show

The best presentations are not collections of facts or statistics. They are stories, put together and performed with dramatic flair. The first question you need to ask yourself is this – “What is the point of this presentation?” Don’t start your preparations until you can provide a confident answer. What emotions are you looking to trigger in your audience? How exactly do you want to influence them, and what actions do you want them to take as a result of your presentation?

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There is much more to a speech than writing the words and moving through a set of key points written on a card or set of slides. How will you move around and vary your voice in such a way that emphasizes your message? Think about the gestures you can use, the facial expressions you will use, and how you will move around the stage.

A great speaker is the main actor/actress, not the backdrop

Most presentations are purely informative. The audience are directed to focus on the presentation slides rather than the person speaking. While if you want to leave an impression, you need to make yourself the focus. Presentation slides are just supplementary. Never, ever let them steal the limelight. See how Scott Dinsmore did that.

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How to make your audience listen to you attentively

To be the limelight on stage, you can’t just directly put all what you want to say on the slides. You need to carefully plan and edit every part.

Only talk about one key point at a time. Don’t be greedy

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    When you provide little on the slide like only one word in the middle, people will look to you for elaboration. When you put multiple points into a single slide, the audience will be so hard working digesting all the information on the slide. This doesn’t help them understand better as human’s brains aren’t designed for multi-tasking. The more points you want them to get, the less they can understand.

    Make sure people can get the gist within 3 seconds

    More than that it means the message isn’t conveyed clearly enough and people will zone out. They’ll completely ignore what you’re going to say even if your ideas are truly brilliant.

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    Always be economical. Cut everything that doesn’t serve a purpose

    Although it’s tempting to include all the interesting things you know/you found when doing research, these would only make your key message weaker if they aren’t highly relevant. Be bold to cut them whenever they don’t add value for the key message. It’s often not what’s added that matters, but what’s cut that matters.

    Illustrate your points with images

      This sounds contradictory but it’s not. When the image can catch audience’s attention and wake them up, you’re actually telling them to look at you again, that you’re going to raise a great point next. What’s more, people retain 10% of what they hear three days following a presentation, but if the information is accompanied by a picture, this figure jumps to 65%.[1]

      Always be specific

      Cliches are hardly memorable. Always add in additional details and fascinating statistics where possible to add character and interest. Like you could simply tell your audience that buying a car is an important decision, but a better approach is to reframe it in terms of numbers and emotions: “To buy a car it entails choosing a vehicle that helps you make memories, that will keep your life running smoothly, and transports you and your loved ones over 13,000 miles each year.”[2] Specific facts and emotive stories will give you a direct line to your audience’s hearts, and you are sure to leave a great impression.

      Reference

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      Brian Lee

      Chief of Product Management at Lifehack

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      Last Updated on May 24, 2019

      How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

      How to Be Productive at Home and Make Every Day a Productive Day

      If you’ve ever wondered how to be productive at home or how you could possibly have a more productive day, look no further.

      Below you’ll find six easy tips that will help you make the most out of your time:

      1. Create a Good Morning Routine

      One of the best ways to start your day is to get up early and eat a healthy breakfast.

      CEOs and other successful people have similar morning routines, which include exercising and quickly scanning their inboxes to find the most urgent tasks.[1]

      You can also try writing first thing in the morning to warm up your brain[2] (750 words will help with that). But no matter what you choose to do, remember to create good morning habits so that you can have a more productive day.

      If you aren’t sure how to make morning routine work for you, this guide will help you:

      The Ultimate Morning Routine to Make You Happy And Productive All Day

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      2. Prioritize

      Sometimes we can’t have a productive day because we just don’t know where to start. When that’s the case, the most simple solution is to list everything you need to get accomplished, then prioritize these tasks based on importance and urgency.

      Week Plan is a simple web app that will help you prioritize your week using the Covey time management grid. Here’s an example of it:[3]

        If you get the most pressing and important items done first, you will be able to be more productive while keeping stress levels down.

        Lifehack’s CEO, Leon, also has great advice on how to prioritize. Take a look at this article to learn more about it:

        How to Prioritize Right in 10 Minutes and Work 10X Faster

        3. Focus on One Thing at a Time

        One of the biggest killers of productivity is distractions. Whether it be noise or thoughts or games, distractions are a barrier to any productive day. That’s why it’s important to know where and when you work best.

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        Need a little background noise to keep you on track? Try working in a coffee shop.

        Can’t stand to hear even the ticking of a clock while writing? Go to a library and put in your headphones.

        Don’t be afraid to utilize technology to make the best of your time. Sites like [email protected] and Simply Noise can help keep you focused and productive all day long.

        And here’s some great apps to help you focus: 10 Online Apps for Better Focus

        4. Take Breaks

        Focusing, however, can drain a lot of energy and too much of it at once can quickly turn your productive day unproductive.

        To reduce mental fatigue while staying on task, try using the Pomodoro Technique. It requires working on a task for 25 minutes, then taking a short break before another 25 minute session.

        After four “pomodoro sessions,” be sure to take a longer break to rest and reflect.

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        I like to work in 25 and 5 minute increments, but you should find out what works best for you.

        5. Manage Your Time Effectively

        A learning strategies consultant once told me that there is no such thing as free time, only unstructured time.

        How do you know when exactly you have free time?

        By using the RescueTime app, you can see when you have free time, when you are productive, and when you actually waste time.

        With this data, you can better plan out your day and keep yourself on track.

        Moreover, you can increase the quality of low-intensity time. For example, reading the news while exercising or listening to meeting notes while cooking. Many of the mundane tasks we routinely accomplish can be paired with other tasks that lead to an overall more productive day.

        A bonus tip, even your real free time can be used productively, find out how:

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        20 Productive Ways to Use Your Free Time

        6. Celebrate and Reflect

        No matter how you execute a productive day, make sure to take time and celebrate what you’ve accomplished. It’s important to reward yourself so that you can continue doing great work. Plus, a reward system is an incredible motivator.

        Additionally, you should reflect on your day in order to find out what worked and what didn’t. Reflection not only increases future productivity, but also gives your brain time to decompress and de-stress.

        Try these 10 questions for daily self reflection.

        More Articles About Daily Productivity

        Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

        Reference

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