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Published on January 6, 2020

4 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine

4 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine

There is an old Buddhist quote that says that the path to Many always leads through One. And when it comes to habits and habit stacking routine, the impact (the Many) that you want to build for yourself has to go through the right input (the One).

So here is the 4-step process to build a positive habit stacking routine. But before we jump into the process, we need to cover a fundamental matter that would serve as the base of our habit stacking routine:

What do you want to accomplish?

There was a guy driving a car once and he got lost in the city. So he stopped by the first house he saw to ask for direction.

“Hey, I’m lost. Can you help me out?”

“Sure thing.”

“Can you point me to Bleecher’s street?”

“Where do you want to go?”

“To the town hall, I have a meeting there.”

“Well, don’t go to Bleecher’s street. Just take this road until the end, turn left, and head straight. You will reach the town hall easier like that.”

“Ok, thanks”, and the guy drove away.

The town hall wasn’t on Bleecher’s street, but the guy who was driving the car and wanted to go to the town hall meeting thought he had to drive through that exact street to reach the town hall.

But he got an easier route and an easier way to reach is because his goal wasn’t Bleecher’s street, it was the town hall.

The same thing applies to your habit stacking routine. It’s not about what you need to do, it’s about what you want to accomplish. The starting point is always the endpoint.

What do you want out of that habit stacking routine at the end? Only once you’re clear on that can you develop an actual path of getting there which is your habit stacking routine.

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And the way you build your habit stacking routine is through the next 4 steps.

1. Outcome-Based Action

This is the step where most habit stacking routines fail actually. Because it’s not about people being lazy and not working stuff, it’s about the decision-making process in distinguishing what is actually important to do. And I want to include a term I picked up from MJ DeMarco here known as “action-faking.”

What is “action-faking” you might ask:

Action-faking (as opposed to “action taking”) is when you take a solitary and/or uncommitted action that is NOT a part of the bigger process.

So what you’re doing is not actually acting to imbue real change, but to momentarily feel good and fool yourself about progress. Action-faking can be many things in many different contexts.

It’s like reading books — if you’re reading them to learn how to build a habit and to understand nuances behind it –cool, then it’s action taking.

But if you’re reading books just to read books or to “double down” on your knowledge because you’re still “not ready,” then you’re simply action-faking. Reading books is important for your progress…. until it’s not.

You mistake that you indeed act, maybe once, twice or for a week, but your actions aren’t directly correlated to what moves the needle. And as I already mentioned in many of my previous articles, the things that move the needle are the only things that matter when it comes to habit building.

But this trick works perfectly for our brains — we’re secreting a momentary dopamine high, fooling ourselves with the progress illusions, when in truth, we’re just wasting time.

So find out what’s your 80/20 (80% of outcomes come from 20% of actions — also known as the Pareto Principle) and just do the 20.

If you want to build a great body and you know that you will need to do it in a gym, then what’s your “20” there? It’s actually going to the gym.

Watching YouTube videos about it is action-faking. Reading books about it is action-faking. Buying equipment like gloves, shoes, clothes, and a gym bag is action-faking.

The only thing that matters is for you to show up at the gym regularly.

That’s the thing that will move the needle and that’s the thing you need to do.

2. Environmental Design

Great, you’ve figured out what you want to accomplish and what the best forward through the process is. I congratulate you on that.

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The next step in our habit stacking process is to design your environment in a way that helps you make a habit out of the “action-taking” process.

So by taking the example above of building a great body and the action-taking process of going to the gym, we come to the point where we need to build a support system for that.

And when it comes to the environmental design, we have two different sides to it and we should use both of them:

Negative Environmental Design

Negative environmental design is about eliminating the things, stuff, people, and situations from your surroundings that make your action-taking (habit stacking routine) harder.

So negative environmental design is about eliminating stuff that prevents you, in the example above, from going to the gym.

With that in mind, we could remove the remote controller and the TV from our living room to stop us from binge-watching TV instead of going to the gym, we could stop hanging out with our colleagues after work that just sucks out all of our energy and depletes us from any resources that we could use to go to the gym. We could also stop going shopping every afternoon because it would free up our time to go to the gym.

These are just a couple of examples of how you can eliminate things our of your environment that prevent you from, in this case, going to the gym.

And then, there is the other side of the same coin.

Positive Environmental Design

Positive environmental design is about adding things, stuff, people, and situations from your surroundings that make your action-taking (habit stacking routine) easier.

So positive environmental design is about adding stuff that helps you, in the example above, to the gym.

With that in mind, we could put our gym bag right next to the doors or carry it with us on our work to jump to the gym as soon as we finish working. Or we could get a gym membership from a local gym which is just 10 minutes away. Also, we could start going to the gym with a partner — it would increase our accountability toward our goals.

These are just a couple of examples and you’re free to create your own. But the point isn’t to just have one or the other, but about having both of them. Some of you will react better to a negative environmental design, while some will need positive environmental design more.

I, personally, am more of a negative environmental design person because I found out that it helps me so much more to stick with my habits than a positive environmental design. And I discovered great ways on how to create the negative environmental design through gamification process[1] I learned from Glisser.com’s blog section. It helped me design my own nega tive environmental process.

Since everyone is different and needs a different dose of both, try out different things and see how they work for you.

3. If/Then Clauses

When most people think about habit stacking routines, they think about if/then clauses.

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“If I put my shoes on, I will go to the gym. If I go to the gym, then I will exercise. If I exercise, then I will get results.”

If/then clauses work perfectly in a habit stacking routine… until you put too much of them. Because you can create the next habit stacking routine:

“If I put my clothes on, then I will go to the gym.
If I go to the gym, then I will exercise.
If I exercise, then I will buy healthy food to eat.”
If I buy healthy food to eat, then I will jog for an hour after.
If I jog for an hour, then I will do a series of push-ups.
If I do a series of push-ups, then I will put clothes next to my bed.
If I put clothes next to my bed, then I will go to sleep.
If I go to sleep, then when I wake up I will put my clothes on.
If I put my clothes on, then I will go to the gym…”

The problem with if/then clauses is that they work for a limited set of factors and lines.

What I mean by that is that you can, and you should, create an if/then clause but only for a limited number of actions.

I always give the advice to limit the number of actions to two. And by that I mean the following:

“If I brush my teeth, I will floss afterward.”

Or

“If I go to the gym, I will exercise.”

Or

“If I buy a healthy meal, I will eat it.”

That’s it. I always recommend just this because it’s easy and it doesn’t program you to do a million different things that change your day drastically. That will have a failure rate of 99,7%.

This is a simple if/then clause that helps you add up just a tiny bit of action for a massive result (remember the 80/20 rule).

And you should limit these clauses to only two new ones per day.

So with our example above of adding up a gym habit, then you can add up just one separate, tiny action on top of something else to stack the habits.

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We already have:

“If I do X, then I will go to the gym.”

If you want to build a great body, then I suggest adding up a tiny if/then clause to something else that is complementary with the gym habit. And here is an example:

  • “If I gossip at the water cooler, then I will eat a banana/apple/something healthy after that.” (positive env. design)
  • “If I have breakfast, then I will add up eggs to it.” (positive env. design)
  • “If I drink coffee today, then I won’t sugar it. (negative env. design)
  • “If I go out for drinks with friends, then I won’t go to a fast-food joint later.” (negative env. design)

You can create your own one, these were just a couple of examples but remember, you have to stick with only one (besides the gym habit).

If you try with more, you won’t be able to pull it off and you will regress back to the starting positions.

4. Make a Straight Line

And this last one is more of a psychological than a technical one. I see this quite often with successful people with a lot of energy and vigor– they want to do things fast because they have the capacity and energy to do it.

But that approach fails the most out of any.

Making a straight line toward your accomplishment isn’t about rushing to the goal and pushing yourself day in, day out. It’s about investing in creating that habit stacking routine that will be a part of your life–forever.

This isn’t a “accomplish and drop” type of work. It’s about a lifestyle. And the only you get to incorporate that into your lifestyle is by going slow, going steady, going straight and going small.

It’s about the daily actions that you do that accumulate into massive results at the end and create the habit in the first place. You don’t build a bridge from a single piece of stone or metal. You do it by stacking small pieces on top of each other to create something strong that lasts.

And with that in mind, I will leave you with a quote you read at the beginning of this article because it perfectly encircles the message.

The path to Many (habits) always leads through One (habit).

More Tips on Habits Building

Featured photo credit: Ben White via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Bruno Boksic

An expert in habit building

Goals vs Objectives: What Are Their Differences? 4 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine 13 Things to Put on Your Daily Checklist for Boosted Productivity How to Create Your Best Morning Routine for Success 23 Good Habits for a Productive and Stress Free Life

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Published on February 17, 2020

What Is a Bullet Journal and What Are the Benefits?

What Is a Bullet Journal and What Are the Benefits?

You may have heard of a productivity method called Bullet Journaling. What is a bullet journal? It is a very personal approach to getting in control of your life and becoming more productive.

It does that by allowing you to build your journal, your system, and your method of journaling with very few limitations.

Traditional journaling, or productivity systems, usually give you a template: a set way to record your information and tasks. You input the information and the system then shows you the information in a predetermined way. Not so with a bullet journal.

What Is a Bullet Journal?

With a bullet journal, you start with a number of symbols and a blank notebook (or a digital equivalent). Your choice of notebook, the pen you use, the ink color, and how you use the symbols is entirely up to you. You have complete freedom.

In a sense, with a bullet journal, instead of having a “system,” you have some best practices that guide you.

Is a Bullet Journal Right for You?

So, with that in mind, would a bullet journal work for you? That depends. A bullet journal is ideal for those who have a strong creative side: a person who does not want to be bound by constraints and limits. Bullet journals give you complete creative freedom, and for many people, that is the attraction.

However, if you are easily distracted and are a bit of a perfectionist, this lack of constraints can be a rabbit hole of lost focus and frustration. There is also the issue of the amount of time it takes to maintain a bullet journal. Depending on how you want your journal to look, these journals can take up a lot of time just to maintain. That is not for everybody.

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How a Bullet Journal Works: An Overview

A bullet journal works by giving you a blank page for each day. You have an appointments section and a to-do section, and after that, you can add anything you want.

In your to-do section, there are a few symbols you will use to indicate what has happened to a to-do:

  • A bullet – a task
  • A bullet with a cross – task complete
  • A dash – indicates a note
  • Forward arrow – task moved to another day
  • A circle – an event

That said, you can of course modify these symbols to suit your tastes.

On top of your daily pages, you will have an index page and a calendar page. How you create these is up to you..

Benefits of a Bullet Journal

1. Improves Your Mental Health

We know journaling has incredible mental health benefits. The act of journaling gives you time for reflection, time to get your thoughts out of your head, and time to review and plan.[1]  It’s a tremendous way to add some much needed perspective in your life.

When you give yourself that valuable time to yourself, you have the opportunity to slow down and contemplate, and that allows your mind to settle, calm down, and reset. In a world that is relentlessly distracting, noisy and frenetic, those quiet moments with your journal can help sooth you.

Learn more about improving your mental health: 8 Simple Ways to Be Mentally Healthy

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2. Helps You Stay on Top of Your Goals

Bullet journaling helps you stay on top of your projects and goals. Your to-do list guides you towards getting important things done each day and gives you a space to collect new tasks, opportunities and events.

Without having a place to store your ideas, tasks and events, it is very easy for these things to slip your mind. When you have a journal with you everywhere you go, it’s very difficult to miss these things because you have them written down.

Being able to see what you have planned, what you would like to achieve, and how you are progressing is a great way to keep you motivated to keep going, even when things get tough.

Read more about how to reach your goals: 6 Golden Rules to Make Progress Towards Achieving Your Goals.

3. Develops Creativity

Bullet journaling can help develop your creativity. Having a blank page every day on which to create your vision for that day engages your creative side, and the more you use your creativity, the more creative you become.

The freedom a bullet journal gives you to write, draw, color in, and develop gets your creative juices flowing. And if you need inspiration, you only need search “bullet journals” and you will be inundated with ideas and examples.

4. Lets You Write Your Life’s Story

Every day you write a few more words of your life’s story. Over time, you build an incredibly unique story — the story of your life. That one reason alone should be enough for you to go out and buy yourself a beautiful notebook in which to start writing your story.

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Most people drift through life without documenting anything. Holidays with loved ones and friends go undocumented, becoming little more than a blur of memory and a long-lost batch of photos hidden among thousands of others stored on your phone.

With a bullet journal, you can write down how you felt and who you were with, and you can print out your favorite photos and stick them into your journal to help you remember. (Yes! You can do that!)

In ten or twenty years, when you look back through your journals, you will be able to re-live those special moments and experience the feelings you had at those times.

5. Helps You Achieve Your Goals Through Writing

The act of writing down your goals is one very powerful step to take towards achieving those goals. Studies have shown that when you write down your goals, you stand a much better chance of actually achieving them.

Having a place to evaluate and review your goals helps keep you on track and keeps those goals up front and center in your life. It is very easy to sit down in the excitement of a new year and tell your friends about all the things you plan to do, only to completely forget about those goals by the end of January.

When you write your goals down in your bullet journal (you can create a goals section), you have a place to remind you of what you want to achieve. This will keep you motivated and focused.

Need more tips for staying motivated? Check out 8 Steps to Continuous Self Motivation Even During the Difficult Times.

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The Bottom Line

There are multiple benefits to keeping a journal, and the beauty of a bullet journal is that you get to create your own way of doing things. There are many resources online to guide and inspire you.

The stories and memories you record in your bullet journal will give you joy and inspiration for years to come. So the next question is, when will you start to create your own.

I have written a step-by-step guide you can use to start building your bullet journal today. This gives you guidance and ideas for the kind of notebook and pen to use, what you can store in your journal, and how to set up the basic structure.

Good luck and happy journaling!

Featured photo credit: Estée Janssens via unsplash.com

Reference

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