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Published on January 6, 2020

4 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine

4 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine

There is an old Buddhist quote that says that the path to Many always leads through One. And when it comes to habits and habit stacking routine, the impact (the Many) that you want to build for yourself has to go through the right input (the One).

So here is the 4-step process to build a positive habit stacking routine. But before we jump into the process, we need to cover a fundamental matter that would serve as the base of our habit stacking routine:

What do you want to accomplish?

There was a guy driving a car once and he got lost in the city. So he stopped by the first house he saw to ask for direction.

“Hey, I’m lost. Can you help me out?”

“Sure thing.”

“Can you point me to Bleecher’s street?”

“Where do you want to go?”

“To the town hall, I have a meeting there.”

“Well, don’t go to Bleecher’s street. Just take this road until the end, turn left, and head straight. You will reach the town hall easier like that.”

“Ok, thanks”, and the guy drove away.

The town hall wasn’t on Bleecher’s street, but the guy who was driving the car and wanted to go to the town hall meeting thought he had to drive through that exact street to reach the town hall.

But he got an easier route and an easier way to reach is because his goal wasn’t Bleecher’s street, it was the town hall.

The same thing applies to your habit stacking routine. It’s not about what you need to do, it’s about what you want to accomplish. The starting point is always the endpoint.

What do you want out of that habit stacking routine at the end? Only once you’re clear on that can you develop an actual path of getting there which is your habit stacking routine.

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And the way you build your habit stacking routine is through the next 4 steps.

1. Outcome-Based Action

This is the step where most habit stacking routines fail actually. Because it’s not about people being lazy and not working stuff, it’s about the decision-making process in distinguishing what is actually important to do. And I want to include a term I picked up from MJ DeMarco here known as “action-faking.”

What is “action-faking” you might ask:

Action-faking (as opposed to “action taking”) is when you take a solitary and/or uncommitted action that is NOT a part of the bigger process.

So what you’re doing is not actually acting to imbue real change, but to momentarily feel good and fool yourself about progress. Action-faking can be many things in many different contexts.

It’s like reading books — if you’re reading them to learn how to build a habit and to understand nuances behind it –cool, then it’s action taking.

But if you’re reading books just to read books or to “double down” on your knowledge because you’re still “not ready,” then you’re simply action-faking. Reading books is important for your progress…. until it’s not.

You mistake that you indeed act, maybe once, twice or for a week, but your actions aren’t directly correlated to what moves the needle. And as I already mentioned in many of my previous articles, the things that move the needle are the only things that matter when it comes to habit building.

But this trick works perfectly for our brains — we’re secreting a momentary dopamine high, fooling ourselves with the progress illusions, when in truth, we’re just wasting time.

So find out what’s your 80/20 (80% of outcomes come from 20% of actions — also known as the Pareto Principle) and just do the 20.

If you want to build a great body and you know that you will need to do it in a gym, then what’s your “20” there? It’s actually going to the gym.

Watching YouTube videos about it is action-faking. Reading books about it is action-faking. Buying equipment like gloves, shoes, clothes, and a gym bag is action-faking.

The only thing that matters is for you to show up at the gym regularly.

That’s the thing that will move the needle and that’s the thing you need to do.

2. Environmental Design

Great, you’ve figured out what you want to accomplish and what the best forward through the process is. I congratulate you on that.

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The next step in our habit stacking process is to design your environment in a way that helps you make a habit out of the “action-taking” process.

So by taking the example above of building a great body and the action-taking process of going to the gym, we come to the point where we need to build a support system for that.

And when it comes to the environmental design, we have two different sides to it and we should use both of them:

Negative Environmental Design

Negative environmental design is about eliminating the things, stuff, people, and situations from your surroundings that make your action-taking (habit stacking routine) harder.

So negative environmental design is about eliminating stuff that prevents you, in the example above, from going to the gym.

With that in mind, we could remove the remote controller and the TV from our living room to stop us from binge-watching TV instead of going to the gym, we could stop hanging out with our colleagues after work that just sucks out all of our energy and depletes us from any resources that we could use to go to the gym. We could also stop going shopping every afternoon because it would free up our time to go to the gym.

These are just a couple of examples of how you can eliminate things our of your environment that prevent you from, in this case, going to the gym.

And then, there is the other side of the same coin.

Positive Environmental Design

Positive environmental design is about adding things, stuff, people, and situations from your surroundings that make your action-taking (habit stacking routine) easier.

So positive environmental design is about adding stuff that helps you, in the example above, to the gym.

With that in mind, we could put our gym bag right next to the doors or carry it with us on our work to jump to the gym as soon as we finish working. Or we could get a gym membership from a local gym which is just 10 minutes away. Also, we could start going to the gym with a partner — it would increase our accountability toward our goals.

These are just a couple of examples and you’re free to create your own. But the point isn’t to just have one or the other, but about having both of them. Some of you will react better to a negative environmental design, while some will need positive environmental design more.

I, personally, am more of a negative environmental design person because I found out that it helps me so much more to stick with my habits than a positive environmental design. And I discovered great ways on how to create the negative environmental design through gamification process[1] I learned from Glisser.com’s blog section. It helped me design my own nega tive environmental process.

Since everyone is different and needs a different dose of both, try out different things and see how they work for you.

3. If/Then Clauses

When most people think about habit stacking routines, they think about if/then clauses.

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“If I put my shoes on, I will go to the gym. If I go to the gym, then I will exercise. If I exercise, then I will get results.”

If/then clauses work perfectly in a habit stacking routine… until you put too much of them. Because you can create the next habit stacking routine:

“If I put my clothes on, then I will go to the gym.
If I go to the gym, then I will exercise.
If I exercise, then I will buy healthy food to eat.”
If I buy healthy food to eat, then I will jog for an hour after.
If I jog for an hour, then I will do a series of push-ups.
If I do a series of push-ups, then I will put clothes next to my bed.
If I put clothes next to my bed, then I will go to sleep.
If I go to sleep, then when I wake up I will put my clothes on.
If I put my clothes on, then I will go to the gym…”

The problem with if/then clauses is that they work for a limited set of factors and lines.

What I mean by that is that you can, and you should, create an if/then clause but only for a limited number of actions.

I always give the advice to limit the number of actions to two. And by that I mean the following:

“If I brush my teeth, I will floss afterward.”

Or

“If I go to the gym, I will exercise.”

Or

“If I buy a healthy meal, I will eat it.”

That’s it. I always recommend just this because it’s easy and it doesn’t program you to do a million different things that change your day drastically. That will have a failure rate of 99,7%.

This is a simple if/then clause that helps you add up just a tiny bit of action for a massive result (remember the 80/20 rule).

And you should limit these clauses to only two new ones per day.

So with our example above of adding up a gym habit, then you can add up just one separate, tiny action on top of something else to stack the habits.

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We already have:

“If I do X, then I will go to the gym.”

If you want to build a great body, then I suggest adding up a tiny if/then clause to something else that is complementary with the gym habit. And here is an example:

  • “If I gossip at the water cooler, then I will eat a banana/apple/something healthy after that.” (positive env. design)
  • “If I have breakfast, then I will add up eggs to it.” (positive env. design)
  • “If I drink coffee today, then I won’t sugar it. (negative env. design)
  • “If I go out for drinks with friends, then I won’t go to a fast-food joint later.” (negative env. design)

You can create your own one, these were just a couple of examples but remember, you have to stick with only one (besides the gym habit).

If you try with more, you won’t be able to pull it off and you will regress back to the starting positions.

4. Make a Straight Line

And this last one is more of a psychological than a technical one. I see this quite often with successful people with a lot of energy and vigor– they want to do things fast because they have the capacity and energy to do it.

But that approach fails the most out of any.

Making a straight line toward your accomplishment isn’t about rushing to the goal and pushing yourself day in, day out. It’s about investing in creating that habit stacking routine that will be a part of your life–forever.

This isn’t a “accomplish and drop” type of work. It’s about a lifestyle. And the only you get to incorporate that into your lifestyle is by going slow, going steady, going straight and going small.

It’s about the daily actions that you do that accumulate into massive results at the end and create the habit in the first place. You don’t build a bridge from a single piece of stone or metal. You do it by stacking small pieces on top of each other to create something strong that lasts.

And with that in mind, I will leave you with a quote you read at the beginning of this article because it perfectly encircles the message.

The path to Many (habits) always leads through One (habit).

More Tips on Habits Building

Featured photo credit: Ben White via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Bruno Boksic

An expert in habit building

How to Break a Bad Habit and Retrain Your Brain How to Create Your Best Morning Routine for Success How to Change a Habit With the Four Quadrants of Change 4 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine 13 Things to Put on Your Daily Checklist for Boosted Productivity

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Last Updated on August 13, 2020

12 Essential Apps for Entrepreneurs To Be Highly Productive

12 Essential Apps for Entrepreneurs To Be Highly Productive

If you are an entrepreneur, then you are aware of the importance of time management. There are only 24 hours in a day, which means you must manage your hours properly to be able to get a lot of work done.

With so much on your shoulders, you need to get organized. How do you achieve that? You do it by becoming tech-savvy and incorporating productivity apps to help you remain on the right track. Below are 12 essential productivity apps for entrepreneurs.

1. Evernote

    Evernote makes it on the list because of one simple reason, besides being your little note book for scribbling your thoughts: Its freeware version is available for Web, iOS and Android. Stay organized across all your devices. Sync files, save Web pages, capture photos, create to-do lists and record voice reminders. What more do you need? Apart from all this, you can also search your tasks on the go.

    2. DropBox

      DropBox delivers instant connectivity and enables the sharing of photos, documents and videos with any laptop or mobile device through the free cloud-based file-storing service. This app is extremely handy for sharing files with your team, which prevents back-and-forth emailing. With the version control feature, you have a convenient way of sharing the latest version with your team.

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      3. Audible

        Ever wondered where entrepreneurs get their ideas from? Surely, they aren’t born with them! Any established entrepreneur you come across is probably very well-read. Hint: Take a chance at reading books and gaining knowledge to spruce up your mind. To help you do just that on the go, try Audible. It lets you listen to books without having to actually focus on reading while you are out travelling or just doing chores.

        4. TripIt: Travel Planner

          Being an entrepreneur means a lot of travelling. It gets hard to keep track of travelling schedules and bookings. With TripIt you no longer have to worry, because it organizes your travels by forwarding your booking confirmations to an email address.

          5. Lastpass

            “Errr…so what was the password?” With so many things on your mind, it can be cumbersome to remember passwords that are usually a combination of various letters and numbers. With a freeware version available for PCs and Macs, Lastpass is your personal-password manager, and form filler, that frees you from remembering your passwords. It costs $12 for the premium version that is available to download on your mobile device.

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            6. Any.Do

              Want to enter tasks on your iPhone? Use Any.Do. With its simple interface, you can add tasks either by speech or typing. If you’re logged on to your Facebook account, you can even share tasks with your contacts. Want to be alerted about a task? Add an alarm, and highlight it so that it takes precedence over other tasks. You can also add further notes and put them in a personal or work folder. The app also allows syncing with other devices to make sure you are always at the top of your game.

              7. CamCard

                Entrepreneurs attend several conferences during the year where they meet useful contacts. Exchanging business cards is the norm in conferences, but it is also very easy to lose a business card and, ultimately, a  business prospect! Don’t let this happen to you. With CamCard, you can take a picture of your business card and have all the details automatically uploaded into your phone contacts and other email accounts. Because of its accuracy, you can be assured of flawless scanning. The best part is that you can sync data across other devices too. The app is usually free for iPhone, but its cost on other mobile phones is $3.26.

                8. Flowdock

                  A mix of chat and inbox tools, Flowdock is a convenient way of collaborating with team members on various projects. The best part is that the app works on most browsers and mobile platforms, and it gives you features such as drag and drop, file uploads and activity streams. Your team members can get instant updates about any change on the project to which they can respond through chat messages.

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                  9. Instapaper

                    The Internet is filled with blogs and articles. Amp up your creativity by reading new posts at a time that suits you. Through Instapaper, you can save an interesting article to read at a more convenient time and in a reader-friendly format.

                    10. Expensify

                      While travelling, you probably want to keep your receipts to claim office expenses once you get home. But why go through the hassle of keeping all these receipts when a smartphone can do the same for you? By using your phone’s camera, you can take pictures of your receipts as a digital record in chronological order. Expensify also lets you log mileage, meal expenses and other business-related travel costs.

                      11. Upwork

                        Screening through resumes and tracking applicants can be cumbersome. You want to hire the best possible people for your company without wasting too much time scanning resumes. So use Upwork to help you perform these tasks; the app helps you manage the entire hiring process. This allows you to spend more time hiring instead of doing manual paper-work sorting out resumes.

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                        The app is also online so it receives all resumes in one place and tracks each candidate’s progress through application stages.

                        12. Zoom

                          Probably the most effective method for remaining in touch with all your employees, Zoom has become an office norm for instant communication and connectivity. With its app version available for mobile phones, connectivity has taken a new form by allowing entrepreneurs to schedule and attend important business conference calls on the go.

                          Bottom Line

                          By using these productivity apps, you have a better chance of organizing a systematic approach for performing tasks. There are many entrepreneurs who are striving for success. However, only a few stand apart on the basis of their work ethic and capacity to grow by incorporating smart apps in their routine.

                          Allow yourself a competitive edge by incorporating these handy productivity apps to enhance your company’s growth.

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