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4 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine

4 Steps to Build a Positive Habit Stacking Routine

There is an old Buddhist quote that says that the path to Many always leads through One. And when it comes to habits and habit stacking routine, the impact (the Many) that you want to build for yourself has to go through the right input (the One).

So here is the 4-step process to build a positive habit stacking routine. But before we jump into the process, we need to cover a fundamental matter that would serve as the base of our habit stacking routine:

What do you want to accomplish?

There was a guy driving a car once and he got lost in the city. So he stopped by the first house he saw to ask for direction.

“Hey, I’m lost. Can you help me out?”

“Sure thing.”

“Can you point me to Bleecher’s street?”

“Where do you want to go?”

“To the town hall, I have a meeting there.”

“Well, don’t go to Bleecher’s street. Just take this road until the end, turn left, and head straight. You will reach the town hall easier like that.”

“Ok, thanks”, and the guy drove away.

The town hall wasn’t on Bleecher’s street, but the guy who was driving the car and wanted to go to the town hall meeting thought he had to drive through that exact street to reach the town hall.

But he got an easier route and an easier way to reach is because his goal wasn’t Bleecher’s street, it was the town hall.

The same thing applies to your habit stacking routine. It’s not about what you need to do, it’s about what you want to accomplish. The starting point is always the endpoint.

What do you want out of that habit stacking routine at the end? Only once you’re clear on that can you develop an actual path of getting there which is your habit stacking routine.

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And the way you build your habit stacking routine is through the next 4 steps.

1. Outcome-Based Action

This is the step where most habit stacking routines fail actually. Because it’s not about people being lazy and not working stuff, it’s about the decision-making process in distinguishing what is actually important to do. And I want to include a term I picked up from MJ DeMarco here known as “action-faking.”

What is “action-faking” you might ask:

Action-faking (as opposed to “action taking”) is when you take a solitary and/or uncommitted action that is NOT a part of the bigger process.

So what you’re doing is not actually acting to imbue real change, but to momentarily feel good and fool yourself about progress. Action-faking can be many things in many different contexts.

It’s like reading books — if you’re reading them to learn how to build a habit and to understand nuances behind it –cool, then it’s action taking.

But if you’re reading books just to read books or to “double down” on your knowledge because you’re still “not ready,” then you’re simply action-faking. Reading books is important for your progress…. until it’s not.

You mistake that you indeed act, maybe once, twice or for a week, but your actions aren’t directly correlated to what moves the needle. And as I already mentioned in many of my previous articles, the things that move the needle are the only things that matter when it comes to habit building.

But this trick works perfectly for our brains — we’re secreting a momentary dopamine high, fooling ourselves with the progress illusions, when in truth, we’re just wasting time.

So find out what’s your 80/20 (80% of outcomes come from 20% of actions — also known as the Pareto Principle) and just do the 20.

If you want to build a great body and you know that you will need to do it in a gym, then what’s your “20” there? It’s actually going to the gym.

Watching YouTube videos about it is action-faking. Reading books about it is action-faking. Buying equipment like gloves, shoes, clothes, and a gym bag is action-faking.

The only thing that matters is for you to show up at the gym regularly.

That’s the thing that will move the needle and that’s the thing you need to do.

2. Environmental Design

Great, you’ve figured out what you want to accomplish and what the best forward through the process is. I congratulate you on that.

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The next step in our habit stacking process is to design your environment in a way that helps you make a habit out of the “action-taking” process.

So by taking the example above of building a great body and the action-taking process of going to the gym, we come to the point where we need to build a support system for that.

And when it comes to the environmental design, we have two different sides to it and we should use both of them:

Negative Environmental Design

Negative environmental design is about eliminating the things, stuff, people, and situations from your surroundings that make your action-taking (habit stacking routine) harder.

So negative environmental design is about eliminating stuff that prevents you, in the example above, from going to the gym.

With that in mind, we could remove the remote controller and the TV from our living room to stop us from binge-watching TV instead of going to the gym, we could stop hanging out with our colleagues after work that just sucks out all of our energy and depletes us from any resources that we could use to go to the gym. We could also stop going shopping every afternoon because it would free up our time to go to the gym.

These are just a couple of examples of how you can eliminate things our of your environment that prevent you from, in this case, going to the gym.

And then, there is the other side of the same coin.

Positive Environmental Design

Positive environmental design is about adding things, stuff, people, and situations from your surroundings that make your action-taking (habit stacking routine) easier.

So positive environmental design is about adding stuff that helps you, in the example above, to the gym.

With that in mind, we could put our gym bag right next to the doors or carry it with us on our work to jump to the gym as soon as we finish working. Or we could get a gym membership from a local gym which is just 10 minutes away. Also, we could start going to the gym with a partner — it would increase our accountability toward our goals.

These are just a couple of examples and you’re free to create your own. But the point isn’t to just have one or the other, but about having both of them. Some of you will react better to a negative environmental design, while some will need positive environmental design more.

I, personally, am more of a negative environmental design person because I found out that it helps me so much more to stick with my habits than a positive environmental design. And I discovered great ways on how to create the negative environmental design through gamification process[1] I learned from Glisser.com’s blog section. It helped me design my own nega tive environmental process.

Since everyone is different and needs a different dose of both, try out different things and see how they work for you.

3. If/Then Clauses

When most people think about habit stacking routines, they think about if/then clauses.

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“If I put my shoes on, I will go to the gym. If I go to the gym, then I will exercise. If I exercise, then I will get results.”

If/then clauses work perfectly in a habit stacking routine… until you put too much of them. Because you can create the next habit stacking routine:

“If I put my clothes on, then I will go to the gym.
If I go to the gym, then I will exercise.
If I exercise, then I will buy healthy food to eat.”
If I buy healthy food to eat, then I will jog for an hour after.
If I jog for an hour, then I will do a series of push-ups.
If I do a series of push-ups, then I will put clothes next to my bed.
If I put clothes next to my bed, then I will go to sleep.
If I go to sleep, then when I wake up I will put my clothes on.
If I put my clothes on, then I will go to the gym…”

The problem with if/then clauses is that they work for a limited set of factors and lines.

What I mean by that is that you can, and you should, create an if/then clause but only for a limited number of actions.

I always give the advice to limit the number of actions to two. And by that I mean the following:

“If I brush my teeth, I will floss afterward.”

Or

“If I go to the gym, I will exercise.”

Or

“If I buy a healthy meal, I will eat it.”

That’s it. I always recommend just this because it’s easy and it doesn’t program you to do a million different things that change your day drastically. That will have a failure rate of 99,7%.

This is a simple if/then clause that helps you add up just a tiny bit of action for a massive result (remember the 80/20 rule).

And you should limit these clauses to only two new ones per day.

So with our example above of adding up a gym habit, then you can add up just one separate, tiny action on top of something else to stack the habits.

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We already have:

“If I do X, then I will go to the gym.”

If you want to build a great body, then I suggest adding up a tiny if/then clause to something else that is complementary with the gym habit. And here is an example:

  • “If I gossip at the water cooler, then I will eat a banana/apple/something healthy after that.” (positive env. design)
  • “If I have breakfast, then I will add up eggs to it.” (positive env. design)
  • “If I drink coffee today, then I won’t sugar it. (negative env. design)
  • “If I go out for drinks with friends, then I won’t go to a fast-food joint later.” (negative env. design)

You can create your own one, these were just a couple of examples but remember, you have to stick with only one (besides the gym habit).

If you try with more, you won’t be able to pull it off and you will regress back to the starting positions.

4. Make a Straight Line

And this last one is more of a psychological than a technical one. I see this quite often with successful people with a lot of energy and vigor– they want to do things fast because they have the capacity and energy to do it.

But that approach fails the most out of any.

Making a straight line toward your accomplishment isn’t about rushing to the goal and pushing yourself day in, day out. It’s about investing in creating that habit stacking routine that will be a part of your life–forever.

This isn’t a “accomplish and drop” type of work. It’s about a lifestyle. And the only you get to incorporate that into your lifestyle is by going slow, going steady, going straight and going small.

It’s about the daily actions that you do that accumulate into massive results at the end and create the habit in the first place. You don’t build a bridge from a single piece of stone or metal. You do it by stacking small pieces on top of each other to create something strong that lasts.

And with that in mind, I will leave you with a quote you read at the beginning of this article because it perfectly encircles the message.

The path to Many (habits) always leads through One (habit).

More Tips on Habits Building

Featured photo credit: Ben White via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Bruno Boksic

An expert in habit building

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Last Updated on March 23, 2021

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

Manage Your Energy so You Can Manage Your Time

One of the greatest ironies of this age is that while various gadgets like smartphones and netbooks allow you to multitask, it seems that you never manage to get things done. You are caught in the busyness trap. There’s just too much work to do in one day that sometimes you end up exhausted with half-finished tasks.

The problem lies in how to keep our energy level high to ensure that you finish at least one of your most important tasks for the day. There’s just not enough hours in a day and it’s not possible to be productive the whole time.

You need more than time management. You need energy management

1. Dispel the idea that you need to be a “morning person” to be productive

How many times have you heard (or read) this advice – wake up early so that you can do all the tasks at hand. There’s nothing wrong with that advice. It’s actually reeks of good common sense – start early, finish early. The thing is that technique alone won’t work with everyone. Especially not with people who are not morning larks.

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I should know because I was once deluded with the idea that I will be more productive if I get out of bed by 6 a.m. Like most of you Lifehackers, I’m always on the lookout for productivity hacks because I have a lot of things in my plate. I’m working full time as an editor for a news agency, while at the same time tending to my side business as a content marketing strategist. I’m also a travel blogger and oh yeah, I forgot, I also have a life.

I read a lot of productivity books and blogs looking for ways to make the most of my 24 hours. Most stories on productivity stress waking up early. So I did – and I was a major failure in that department – both in waking up early and finishing early.

2. Determine your “peak hours”

Energy management begins with looking for your most productive hours in a day. Getting attuned to your body clock won’t happen instantly but there’s a way around it.

Monitor your working habits for one week and list down the time when you managed to do the most work. Take note also of what you feel during those hours – do you feel energized or lethargic? Monitor this and you will find a pattern later on.

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My experiment with being a morning lark proved that ignoring my body clock and just doing it by disciplining myself to wake up before 8 a.m. will push me to be more productive. I thought that by writing blog posts and other reports in the morning that I would be finished by noon and use my lunch break for a quick gym session. That never happened. I was sleepy, distracted and couldn’t write jack before 10 a.m.

In fact that was one experiment that I shouldn’t have tried because I should know better. After all, I’ve been writing for a living for the last 15 years, and I have observed time and again that I write more –and better – in the afternoon and in evenings after supper. I’m a night owl. I might as well, accept it and work around it.

Just recently, I was so fired up by a certain idea that – even if I’m back home tired from work – I took out my netbook, wrote and published a 600-word blog post by 11 p.m. This is a bit extreme and one of my rare outbursts of energy, but it works for me.

3. Block those high-energy hours

Once you have a sense of that high-energy time, you can then mold your schedule so that your other less important tasks will be scheduled either before or after this designated productive time.

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Block them out in your calendar and use the high-energy hours for your high priority tasks – especially those that require more of your mental energy and focus. You also need to use these hours to any task that will bring you closer to you life’s goal.

If you are a morning person, you might want to schedule most business meetings before lunch time as it’s important to keep your mind sharp and focused. But nothing is set in stone. Sometimes you have to sacrifice those productive hours to attend to other personal stuff – like if you or your family members are sick or if you have to attend your son’s graduation.

That said, just remember to keep those productive times on your calendar. You may allow for some exemptions but stick to that schedule as much as possible.

There’s no right or wrong way of using this energy management technique because everything depends on your own personal circumstances. What you need to remember is that you have to accept what works for you – and not what other productivity gurus say you should do.

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Understanding your own body clock is the key to time management. Without it, you end up exhausted chasing a never-ending cycle of tasks and frustrations.

Featured photo credit: Collin Hardy via unsplash.com

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