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Last Updated on February 9, 2021

How to Develop Critical Thinking Skills and Think Clearer

How to Develop Critical Thinking Skills and Think Clearer
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Every day, we are bombarded by information. From the morning paper to news and on social media throughout the day. We might not think of it much now but, that’s an overwhelming amount of information.

And it can be dangerous in some cases. From fake news or inaccurate information, or the information heavily biased.

This, in turn, impacts you. It impacts who you vote for, what you buy and maybe how you feel. In a sense, the information we consume dictates our entire life.

As a result, critical thinking skills become our saving grace in our lives. It’s a skill that so many of us lack in our lives and yet it’s one of the most critical.

The Importance of Critical Thinking Skills

First off they help with critical thinking, a skill I said that many people lack these days. Critical thinking is merely our ability to be thinking, and present evidence for our ideas.

How is this different from how we typically think?

Well, most of us tend to gravitate towards our own personal reasoning. We cling to information and ideas naturally without checking them. And of course, we develop a bias, pushing away other ideas and only accepting ideas and opinions that support our existing belief.

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To see that in motion, consider a CEO similar to the man I read about in an article published in Harvard Business Review.[1] He was very confident in himself and believed he was the market leader of a company. But eventually, he lost one of their largest clients.

How did that happen? Because the CEO was certain his clients wouldn’t leave and that leaving would be expensive. He didn’t consider the possibility they could leave.

Another way to think of critical thinking is that it’s a self-directed, self-monitored, self-disciplined, and self-corrective method of thinking.

Why this is important boils down to several reasons:

  • A universal skill – Regardless of occupation, having critical thinking skills helps. True, some jobs need it more than others but there is always a time and place to use this skill anywhere. It’s why many people value this talent regardless of field.
  • Improve language and presentation skills – Critical thinking can also determine how we best articulate and present our ideas.
  • Promote creativity – Critical thinking often demands we think creative.[2] Whether it’s finding a middle ground between ideas or presenting an idea outright, how we get there is through a creative process.
  • Improve self-reflection – If critical thinking demands self-correction, there is some level of self-reflection involved. You can’t present ideas using critical thinking skills unless you’ve spent time reflecting.
  • Solve problems before they become bigger – Critical thinking allows us to look at situations and to digest them in different ways. We can identify problems before they become larger issues.

Examples of Critical Thinking Skills

As I said, critical thinking skills aren’t restricted to specific occupations or scenarios. Examples of this way of thinking at work are:

  • A manager considers customer feedback and uses that information to create training sessions for employees in customer service.
  • A real estate agent reviews the home and surrounding area to determine how to best sell to their customers.
  • A stock investor keeps an eye on the news to determine whether to sell their shares or invest in a company.
  • An attorney reviews evidence to devise a strategy to win the case or whether this matter should be settled out of court.
  • A group of nurses analyze patients’ medical conditions to determine which order each patient should be treated.

Another great example of critical thinking is actually an exercise that you can do as well. It forms the basis of critical thinking skills.

In this example, think about something someone told you recently. Follow that up with the following questions. The questions in parentheses dive deeper:

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  • Who said it? (Someone you know? A manager? Does it matter who told you this?)
  • What did they say? (Was it a fact or opinion? Did they present all the information or did they leave something out?)
  • Where did they say it? (Public or private area?)
  • When did they say it? (Is timing important? Was it before, during, or after an important event?)
  • Why did they say it? (Did they explain their opinion? Was the goal to make someone look good or bad?)
  • How did they say it? (Recall their tonne and body language. Were they happy, indifferent or sad? Could you make out everything they said?)

This exercise is simple but it adds perspective to what critical thinking is like.

How to Develop Critical Thinking Skills

Anyone can develop critical thinking skills, the big question is how to do it. Asking yourself questions is a good start and ensuring you dig deeper, however, consider these other techniques.

1. Ask Meaningful Questions

The questions mentioned above are solid, but you can go deeper. But before asking them, it’s key that you don’t take everything you read or hear as the absolute truth.

This sets asides biases and favouritism, and helps you to ask those important questions such as:

  • What’s the problem?
  • What are all the solutions to this problem?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of each one?

You still have to believe in something, however by setting aside biases and ask those meaningful questions, you feel confident about your decisions.

2. Look at Motives

Information and conversations always have a motive. After all, people are the ones who control that and there is always some agenda. Yes, no one isn’t always going to tell you outright what that is, but it’s safe to think there is one, malicious or not.

But understanding others’ motives can be tricky and have several pitfalls as motives can often be conflated with personality and character, or disguised by emotions.[3]  And that’s all the more reason to evaluate information based on where it’s coming from. This should also determine how you act on it- if at all.

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3. Do the Research

Critical thinking skills demand information. And while information is overwhelming at times, it’s also the most powerful tool around. It becomes incredibly powerful when you decide to make your own decisions.

Do research when you have a problem you need to solve or have a decision to make. Google about the subject, and read books about it. Do so until you have a grasp and understanding as that’ll better prepare you for the future.

4. Never Assume You’re Right

We all love to be right and naturally, we think we’re right most of the time. And why wouldn’t we? We naturally have a bias to place ourselves in the best light possible. But while that feeling is definitely good, it’s that very feeling that can lead us down the wrong track: Why Our Minds Can’t Be Trusted And What We Can Do With It

Critical thinking demands self-reflection and self-monitoring, and sometimes, we have to accept that we’re wrong. Thinking this way allows us to embrace other perspectives. It helps us to develop empathy and understanding of parties involved.

If your form of thinking is taking someone’s thoughts and comparing them to your own, you’re not really doing much thinking. And it’s definitely not thinking critically.

5. Make It Simple

Occam’s razor[4] is a term used in the hypothesis step within the scientific community. What this theory suggests is that the hypothesis that provides the simplest explanation is likely the one that fits all the facts. It’s what we would call the most obvious explanation. And this obvious explanation is the truth until it’s proven wrong.

But the point here is that Occam’s razor is basically a theory that has a bias towards the common sense answer. However, it has other applications outside of science.

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For example, you turn on the TV and you see an ad promoting a high-priced anti-ageing cream. It’s something that many are excited for. The big hook is that this cream will make you look 10 or 20 years younger.

But you can break that down using Occam’s razor. Have you ever heard of that product before? If not, how can it be such a big hit if it’s so new? It’s also fair to say that there is a high chance that the company behind the product hired a younger model to promote this too. Meaning it’s likely the cream is bogus and over-hyped.

Final Thoughts

Developing critical thinking skills isn’t as simple as asking questions. It’s a deeper process that places a lot of weight on you. You need to develop deeper skills and to set aside your own thoughts and opinions.

However, by doing this, you are opening the door to a lot of self-growth and fulfilment. After all, so many people are looking for people who can think for themselves and to think in more creative and critical ways.

More About Thinking Smarter

Featured photo credit: Priscilla Du Preez via unsplash.com

Reference

More by this author

Leon Ho

Founder & CEO of Lifehack

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Last Updated on July 21, 2021

Are You Right-Brain Dominant? (7 Right Brain Characteristics)

Are You Right-Brain Dominant? (7 Right Brain Characteristics)
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Do you prefer drawing to writing? If so, you are most likely right-brain dominant.

When we break down the characteristics of a right-brain dominant person, we can think of someone very visual, a little spontaneous, and often labeled as emotional. They may struggle with memorization, as well as paying attention to detail. We most likely label those who are right-brain dominant as “creative”. Their learning styles often differ from a left-brain dominant person, who traditionally tends to do very well in western school systems. A right-brain dominant person on the other hand, can find it difficult to settle into routines. However, working in group settings are ideal for them, this helps them nurture the creative nature that comes with being right-brain dominant.

Here’re 7 right brain characteristics:

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1. You Prefer Drawing to Writing

If you are right-brain dominant, you most likely would rather create a picture to tell your story than writing it down word for word. Right-brain dominant people often find themselves creating visuals for ongoing learning methods.

2. You Prefer Open-Ended Questions to Multiple Choice

Since right-brain dominant people thrive in group settings, answering questions posed in an open-ended format tends to be more natural for them than answering questions in multiple choice format. Settings that allows for discussion and freedom when finding solutions is better for a right brain dominant person than finding solutions through “black and white” methods.

3. You Tend To Be Disorganized

A right-brain dominant person may have difficulties staying on task and keeping things in order. This can be as simple as maintaining a neat and clean work desk or completing specific academic tasks.

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4. You Have Difficulty Focusing for Long Periods of Time

A right-brain dominant person requires constant stimulation. Remember, they are visual beings. If you place a right-brain dominant person in a traditional western school, they will have a hard time focusing, as they need constant stimulation.

5. You Have Less Than Average Memorization Skills

When it comes to memorization, right-brain dominant people require a unique way to call upon information they’ve digested.[1] Instead of repetition to remember specific details, use meanings, colors, visual representations and emotions.

6. You Are a Holistic Thinker

A right-brain dominant person refers to the bigger picture, in other words they are holistic thinkers. They have the ability to recognize interconnectedness of the smaller pieces that make up the big picture.

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7. You Can Be Spontaneous And Intuitive

Right-brain dominant people like adventure and thrive off of energy and spontaneity. They are emotionally intuitive and tend to be emotional by nature.

How to Make Good Use of Right Brain Characteristics?

If you have right-brain tendencies, you know that some of the characteristics listed above can be used to your advantage. You can choose a career that corresponds to these strengths in order to nurture your creative self.

Don’t be afraid to go into the opposite direction as well– having some right-brain traits doesn’t stop you from pursuing left-brain activities, and strengthening your own weaknesses.

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Final Thoughts

Be sure to be mindful that the labels “left” or “right-brain” are not truly an important matter. It just helps you observe the characteristics you already have.

Don’t pigeonhole yourself by solely identifying with one or the other, because in reality both hemispheres are functioning. Determining if you fit the left or right-brained stereotype will merely help you identify your strengths and weaknesses, and help you expand on them later.

More Tips About Boosting Brain Power

Featured photo credit: Daria Tumanova via unsplash.com

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Reference

[1] The Education Alliance: Right Brain vs. Left Brain

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