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Last Updated on January 6, 2020

13 Essential Transferable Skills to Accelerate Your Success

13 Essential Transferable Skills to Accelerate Your Success

Transferable skills are a specific set of skills that crossover into multiple job roles and positions. These skills are general and can be used in multiple industries: blue collar, white collar, and in life. Transferable skills are valued by many corporations and organizations because they can be used and applied companywide.

Transferable skills included, but not limited to: problem solving, teamwork, leadership, time management, and personal motivation. Let’s break down the examples:

  • Being a problem solver means you are a critical thinker; this means you likely excel at strategy.
  • Good leadership skills means you can take charge and motivate other employees.
  • Having good time management skills means that you can organize and prioritize which means you are productive.
  • Being personally motivated means that you are a self-starter and can work with minimal supervision.

Interpersonal skills, in my opinion, are the core of transferable skills. A few examples are:

  • Dependable means the company can rely on you to get the job done.
  • Active listening means that you can secure information because you are present, in the room, and not in your head.
  • Communication means that you can communicate clearly and effectively- both verbally and in writing.

A few examples were mentioned and described above. In addition to those, these 13 transferable skills should be developed and pointed out in your resume and cover letter.

The list of transferable skills below can be used and transferred between multiple job types and industries.

1. Cross-Functional Collaboration

It means that you have the ability to collaborate with multiple departments on initiatives that impact the full organization.

2. Personal Development

It means that you have the ability to take ownership of your development, you take ownership of growing and progressing.

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3. Analytical Skills

It means that you have the ability to analyze and evaluate critical information.

4. Adaptability

It means that you have the ability to learn quickly and adapt to change- which is the only constant in life and in a business organization.

5. Organization

It means that you have the ability to organize tasks which means you have the ability to meet important deadlines.

6. Public Speaking

It means that you have the ability to lead meetings and speak in front of groups.

7. Relationship Building / Management

It means that you have the ability to establish and nurture relationships which means you have the ability to network.

8. Coaching / Mentoring

It means that you have the ability to develop and train other employees.

9. Customer Service

It means that you have the ability to interact with people in a professional manner. Even if the position doesn’t work with the general public, internal customers are just as important. For example: IT services an entire organization of people.

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10. Bilingual / Multi-lingual

It means that you have the ability to communicate and translate between international partners, customers, sponsors, etc.

11. Planning

It means that you have the ability to identify problems, develop strategies, and define requirements.

12. Project Management

Although this is an actual job/ position, it means that you have the ability to manage projects and initiatives. And that you have the ability to manage the project finances and reporting.

13. Negotiating

It means that you have the ability to debate, deliberate, and reach agreements.

So there you go, 13 transferable skills that are important for your career success. But maybe you still have a lot of questions in your mind about transferable skills. So here’re some of the commonly asked questions that may help you.

How to Develop Transferable Skills?

Naturally, transferable skills are developed at every stage of life; they enhance and get better with time.

Let’s walk through life starting with teenage years:

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  • High School: being a member of clubs/organizations helps build teamwork skills.
  • College: being a college student helps build time management skills.
  • Volunteer work: this helps build empathy and personal motivation.
  • Internships: this is the entry way into the workforce and helps strengthen communication.
  • Entry level jobs: this helps strengthen dependability and leadership.

Check out this piece on honing in on transferable skills: How to Sharpen Your Transferable Skills For a Swift Career Switch

How to Highlight Transferable Skills on a Resume and Cover Letter?

Always review the job posting or job requisition thoroughly to determine the skill set required/desired by the employer.

As discussed in this DIY resume guide below, applicant tracking systems rule everything when you “apply now”. Your resume and cover letter should be specific to the job being applied to. Let’s take a look at the resume guide here:

Job Scan says the following about ATS:

Applicant tracking systems are used by corporations to assist with recruitment and hiring processes. Each system offers a different combination and scope of features, but ATS are primarily used to help hiring companies collect, organize, and filter applicants. Corporate recruiters can have their ATS automatically extract information from an applicant’s resume to build a digital applicant profile that can be searched, filtered, and/or ranked. The goal is to quickly cull out anyone who is under-qualified, make the applicant pool smaller, and quickly identify the top candidates.

Highlighting transferable skills within your qualifications summary and area of expertise is recommended. Also, further elaboration on the cover letter is recommended. Here’s an example for each:

A resume sentence for the qualification’s summary:

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History of success managing client relationships by evaluating client’s needs and recommending solutions and services that are suitable.

A cover letter sentence:

I am accustomed to the rigors of fast-paced, regulated environments requiring sharp attention to detail, consummate accuracy, and exceptional communication skills.

How to Highlight Transferable Skills When Changing Careers?

This is where transferable skills help the most. For someone seeking a career change, transferable skills take lead in resume and cover letter development strategy.

If you are currently a bank teller, and you are wanting to transition into an office manager role, you want to make sure to highlight the transferable skills that apply to both roles: customer service, organization, filing paperwork, and financial transactions to name a few.

Keep in mind that no matter what, the first step is to determine the skills needed by thoroughly reviewing the job posting. You want to highlight the transferred skills required and desired because your resume and cover letter must speak to the job being applied to – because ATS rules the recruiting process.

More About Career Success

Featured photo credit: Adeolu Eletu via unsplash.com

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Veronica Castillo

Vee Castil; Resume & Career Writer ᛫ Traveler ᛫ Vegan ᛫ Weight Loss Success (-85lbs)

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

Do you think of yourself as a creative person? Do you play the drums or do watercolor paintings? Perhaps compose songs or direct plays? Can you even relate to any of these so called ‘creative’ experiences? Growing up, did you ever have that ‘artistic’ sibling or friend who excelled in drawing, playing instruments or literature? And you maybe wondered why you can’t even compose a birthday card greeting–or that drawing stick figures is the furthest you’ll ever get to drawing a family portrait. Many people have this common assumption that creativity is an inborn talent; only a special group of people are inherently creative, and everyone else just unfortunately does not have that special ability. You either have that creative flair or instinct, or you don’t. But, this is far from the truth! So what is creativity?

Can I Be Creative?

The fact is, that everyone has an innate creative ability. Despite what most people may think, creativity is a skill that everyone can learn and hone on. It’s a skill with huge leverage that allows you to generate enormous amounts of value from relatively little input. How is that so? You’ll have to start by expanding your definition of creativity. Ironically, you have to be creative and ‘think out of the box’ with the definition! Creativity at its heart, is being able to see things in a way that others cannot. It’s a skill that helps you find new perspectives to create new possibilities and solutions to different problems. So, if you encounter different challenges and problems that need solving on a regular basis, then creativity is an invaluable skill to have.Let’s say, for example, that you work in sales. Having creativity will help you to look for new ways to approach and reach out to potential customers. Or perhaps you’re a teacher. In this role you have to constantly look for new ways to deliver your message and educate your students.

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How Creativity Works

Let me break another misconception about creativity, which is that it’s only used to create completely “new” or “original” things. Again, this is far from the truth. Because nothing is ever completely new or original. Everything, including works of art, doesn’t come from nothing. Everything derives from some sort of inspiration. That means that creativity works by connecting things together in order to derive new meaning or value.From this perspective, you can see a lot of creativity in action. In technology, Apple combines traditional computers with design and aesthetics to create new ways to use digital products. In music, a musician may be inspired by various styles of music, instruments and rhythms to create an entirely new type of song. All of these examples are about connecting different ideas, finding common ground amongst the differences, and creating a completely new idea out of them.

What Really Is Creativity?

Creativity Needs an Intention

Another misconception about the creative process is that you can just be in a general “creative” state. Real creativity isn’t about coming up with “eureka!” moments for random ideas. Instead, to be truly creative, you need to have a direction. You have to ask yourself this question: “What problem am I trying to solve?” Only by knowing the answer to this question can you start flexing your creativity muscles. Often times, the idea of creativity is associated with the ‘Right’ brain, with intuition and imagination. Hence a lot of focus is placed on the ‘Right’ brain when it comes to creativity. But, to get the most out of creativity, you need to utilize both sides of your brain–Right and Left–which means using the analytical and logical part of your brain, too. This may sound surprising to you, but creativity has a lot to do with problem solving. And, problem solving inherently involves logic and analysis. So instead of throwing out the ‘Left’ brain, full creativity needs them to work in unison. For example, when you’re looking for new ideas, your ‘Left’ brain will guide you to a place of focus, which is based on your objective behind the ideas you’re searching for. The ‘Right’ brain then guides you to gather and explore based on your current focus. And when you decide to try out these new ideas, your ‘Right’ brain will give you novel solutions outside of the ones you already know. Your ‘Left’ brain then helps you evaluate and tune the solutions to work better in practice. So, logic and creativity actually work hand in hand, and not one at the expense of the other.

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Creativity Is a Skill

At the end of the day, creativity is a skill. It’s not some innate or natural born talent that some have over others. What this means is that creativity and innovation can be practiced and improved upon systematically.A skill can be learned and practiced by applying your strongest learning styles. Want to know what your learning style is? Try this test. A skill can be measured and improved through a Feedback Loop, and can be continuously upgraded over time by regular practice. Through regular practice, your creativity goes through different stages of proficiency. This means that you can become more and more creative! If you never thought that creativity was relevant to you, or that you don’t have a knack for being creative… think again! You can use creativity in any aspect of your life. In fact you should use it, as it will allow you to to break through your usual loop, get you out of your comfort zone, and inspire you to grow and try new things. Creativity will definitely give you an edge when you’re trying to solve a problem or come up with new solutions.

Start Connecting the Dots

Excited to start honing your creativity? Here at Lifehack, we’ve got a wealth of knowledge to help you get started. We understand that creativity is a matter of connecting things together in order to derive new meaning or value. So, if you want to learn how to start connecting the dots, check out these tips:

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Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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