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11 Inherent Traits Of Real Leaders

11 Inherent Traits Of Real Leaders

The success of our companies and countries ultimately depends on our leaders. In addition to skills, real leaders bring a set of important traits to their work. These traits are often developed and refinded through experience. These insights have come from a variety of leaders and leadership experts working in many different fields.

Let’s dive in and find out if you are a real leader by examining these inherent traits.

1. They are honest

In their classic leadership book, “The Truth About Leadership”, James M. Kouzes and Barry S. Posner surveyed people across the world regarding leadership. The far-ranging study found that honesty is the number one trait people want in their leaders. Without this strong moral foundation, a leader has no credibility.

TIP: Honesty matters to your work even if you are not in a leadership role – 4 Reasons Why You Should Always Be Honest.

2. They want the best for their people

Real leaders deeply value the people that work under their leadership. For example, entrepreneur Jon Taffer (known for his TV show Bar Rescue), demonstrates his belief in people by training them and giving them feedback to improve. As a result of his leadership, his company sees a turnover rate far lower than the industry average.

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To apply this principle to your leadership role, take the time to understand what your people want. Some staff may want schedule flexibility, while others will be focused on career advancement.

Resource: Four Leadership Tips to Bring Out the Best in Your Team.

3. They know their strengths

A key principle in management research tells us that top performance comes from working on our strengths. In their study of 2 million people, Marcus Buckingham and Donald O. Clifton found that working in your strengths is vital. Their insights are explained in greater detail in the book, “Now, Discover Your Strengths.”

TIP: Read Why Knowing Yourself Is Essential To Leadership.

4. They know leadership is influence

Leadership author and expert John C Maxwell has taught the principle that leadership is influence for decades in his speeches and books. Real leaders understand that they cannot simply rely on their title or formal authority to get results. Instead, they have to build up influence through relationships, setting a good example, and other means. A focus on influence means that you can begin to lead people, no matter your job title.

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TIP: Read 10 Ways to Positively Influence Others In The Workplace to discover how to use your influence skills for the common good.

5. They know motivation, inside out

“I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life and that is why I succeed.” – Michael Jordan, NBA Basketball champion

Motivating yourself to work and achieving results is the foundation for an effective leader. A good leader knows the importance of mastering their own motivation, even to keep working through dull activities. Armed with that understanding, real leaders motivate their people to keep working.

TIP: A few words, at the right time, make all the difference to motivation – 50 Motivational Quotes That Will Put Your Motivation on Overdrive.

6. They keep growing

Without a growing leader, an organization will struggle to grow. Dedicated leaders keep learning by reading books, working through conferences, and meeting with top performers. This principle holds true even if you fail to observe it. For example, Sarah Palin was unable to name any magazines or periodicals she reads to stay informed about current affairs during a 2008 interview with Katie Couric.

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TIP: Keep growing yourself through personal development – 22 Killer Personal Development Resources You’re Missing Out On.

7. They are ambitious for their organization

Real leaders know the importance of focusing on their organization, rather than their personal glory. Management researcher Jim Collins found that the best CEOs seek growth for their organization. While some “celebrity CEOs” achieve their results during their tenure, those results fade once they leave the C-suite.

To apply this principle, use it to make decisions. Ask the question, “Is this decision best for the organization or is it good for me?”

8. They keep working through challenges

Every leader faces major challenges and disappointments. What sets real leaders apart from the rest is their ability to work through setbacks. For example, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was declined admission to military school on his first application. He kept studying and applying until he was granted admission. Churchill’s determination to keep working at a challenging goal is a key trait that led him to success later in life.

TIP: Different challenges require different responses – 10 Challenges Leaders Always Face And How To Deal With Them.

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9. They value effective communication

Communication is a key skill that real leaders take the time to master. For example, Demosthenes became a highly successful public speaker and leader in ancient Greece through years of effort. For years, he struggled to speak effectively. How did he improve? He used a variety of methods, including speaking with pebbles in his mouth. Working through discomfort to grow your communication skills is an important trait among real leaders.

10. They are willing to admit when they are wrong

Leaders are constantly making decisions. From time to time, they will make mistakes. When those mistakes occur, real leaders know the importance of admitting the mistake and moving on. For example, President Obama admitted to making a mistake regarding a decision regarding Tom Daschle shortly after taking office. It is rare for a U.S. President to admit mistakes in office, yet Obama and other Presidents have done it on occasion.

TIP: To inspire you to own your mistakes, read How to Admit Your Mistakes.

11. They focus on the future

A future focus is a key trait for leaders. In “The Truth About Leadership,” the second most admired trait in leaders (after honesty) is to be forward-looking. While there is value in understanding the past, real leaders realize that they cannot change history. Even better, leaders know that their people are inspired by future potential, rather than revisiting past mistakes.

Resource: For a broader perspective, read The Seven Qualities of Visionary Leaders

Featured photo credit: Steve Jobs/Bob Stanfield via flickr.com

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Bruce Harpham

Bruce Harpham is a Project Management Professional and Founder and CEO of Project Management Hacks.

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Last Updated on September 11, 2019

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

Why To-Do Lists Don’t Work (And How to Change That)

How often do you feel overwhelmed and disorganized in life, whether at work or home? We all seem to struggle with time management in some area of our life; one of the most common phrases besides “I love you” is “I don’t have time”. Everyone suggests working from a to-do list to start getting your life more organized, but why do these lists also have a negative connotation to them?

Let’s say you have a strong desire to turn this situation around with all your good intentions—you may then take out a piece of paper and pen to start tackling this intangible mess with a to-do list. What usually happens, is that you either get so overwhelmed seeing everything on your list, which leaves you feeling worse than you did before, or you make the list but are completely stuck on how to execute it effectively.

To-do lists can work for you, but if you are not using them effectively, they can actually leave you feeling more disillusioned and stressed than you did before. Think of a filing system: the concept is good, but if you merely file papers away with no structure or system, the filing system will have an adverse effect. It’s the same with to-do lists—you can put one together, but if you don’t do it right, it is a fruitless exercise.

Why Some People Find That General To-Do Lists Don’t Work?

Most people find that general to-do lists don’t work because:

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  • They get so overwhelmed just by looking at all the things they need to do.
  • They don’t know how to prioritize the items on list.
  • They feel that they are continuously adding to their list but not reducing it.
  • There’s a sense of confusion seeing home tasks mixed with work tasks.

Benefits of Using a To-Do List

However, there are many advantages working from a to-do list:

  • You have clarity on what you need to get done.
  • You will feel less stressed because all your ‘to do’s are on paper and out of your mind.
  • It helps you to prioritize your actions.
  • You don’t overlook so many tasks and forget anything.
  • You feel more organized.
  • It helps you with planning.

4 Golden Rules to Make a To-Do List Work

Here are my golden rules for making a “to-do” list work:

1. Categorize

Studies have shown that your brain gets overwhelmed when it sees a list of 7 or 8 options; it wants to shut down.[1] For this reason, you need to work from different lists. Separate them into different categories and don’t have more than 7 or 8 tasks on each one.

It might work well for you to have a “project” list, a “follow-up” list, and a “don’t forget” list; you will know what will work best for you, as these titles will be different for everybody.

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2. Add Estimations

You don’t merely need to know what has to be done, but how long it will take as well in order to plan effectively.

Imagine on your list you have one task that will take 30 minutes, another that could take 1 hour, and another that could take 4 hours. You need to know the moment you look at the task, otherwise you undermine your planning, so add an extra column to your list and include your estimation of how long you think the task will take, and be realistic!

Tip: If you find it a challenge to estimate accurately, then start by building this skill on a daily basis. Estimate how long it will take to get ready, cook dinner, go for a walk, etc., and then compare this to the actual time it took you. You will start to get more accurate in your estimations.

3. Prioritize

To effectively select what you should work on, you need to take into consideration: priority, sequence and estimated time. Add another column to your list for priority. Divide your tasks into four categories:

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  • Important and urgent
  • Not urgent but important
  • Not important but urgent
  • Not important or urgent

You want to work on tasks that are urgent and important of course, but also, select some tasks that are important and not urgent. Why? Because these tasks are normally related to long-term goals, and when you only work on tasks that are urgent and important, you’ll feel like your day is spent putting out fires. You’ll end up neglecting other important areas which most often end up having negative consequences.

Most of your time should be spent on the first two categories.

4.  Review

To make this list work effectively for you, it needs to become a daily tool that you use to manage your time and you review it regularly. There is no point in only having the list to record everything that you need to do, but you don’t utilize it as part of your bigger time management plan.

For example: At the end of every week, review the list and use it to plan the week ahead. Select what you want to work on taking into consideration priority, time and sequence and then schedule these items into your calendar. Golden rule in planning: don’t schedule more than 75% of your time.

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Bottom Line

So grab a pen and paper and give yourself the gift of a calm and clear mind by unloading everything in there and onto a list as now, you have all the tools you need for it to work. Knowledge is useless unless it is applied—how badly do you want more time?

To your success!

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Featured photo credit: Emma Matthews via unsplash.com

Reference

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