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10 Best Marketing Books Of 2014

10 Best Marketing Books Of 2014

Katy Perry is not necessarily everyone’s idea of a musician, but she is the epitome of an excellent marketer. By knowing her consumer base sheis consistently able to brand her image to their liking. Ms. Perry is also able tomanage both traditional and social media outlets to a point where even Bing Crosby fans know and listen to her music. But whether or not you’re a Katy Perry fan, if you need a bit of help either creating your own brand image or marketing yourself to the top of the corporate ladder, here are 10 of the best marketing booksto help.

1. 80/20 Sales and Marketing: The Definitive Guide to Working Less and Making More — by Perry Marshall forward by Richard Koch

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    If you’ve been in the corporate world, or had some kind of business experience, you’ve hear of the 80/20 rule — 20% of the people accomplish 80% of the work. Marshall’s book takes this adlibbed truism and shows you how to apply itto“almost anything you can measure in a business.”

    2.The Art of Social Media: Power Tips for Power Users — by Guy Kawasaki and Peg Fitzpatrick

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      Kawasaki’s book is written to help you learn how to “rock social media.” And unless you’ve been living with the Flintstones in the Rock Age, you know that all businesses require a social media platform.This books helps you to empower social media to help you past just the basics of blogging and Tweeting.

      3. Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook: How To Tell Your Story in a Noisy Social World: by Gary Vaynerchuck

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        Because, “social media is no longer just pulling the audience away from traditional marketing; it’s cannibalizing digital media, too,” Vaynerchuck’s book has become an important guide in how to marry communication and content to attain stellar results.

        4. The Power of Visual Story Telling:How toUse Visuals, Videos, and Social Media to Market Your Brand– by Ekaterina Walter and Jessica Gioglio

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        storytelling

          “Images don’t just paint a thousand words. They can communicate something far more specific than words — specific emotions, specific feelings, specific moods, things that are almost impossible to convey using words.”Amen.

          5. What Great Brands Do:The Seven Brand-Building Principles That Separate the Best From the Rest — by Denise Lee Yohn

          brands

            While it is definitely true that rapid advancements in technology over the past ten years have changed much of how business is conducted, one thing has not changed — companies still need to have a positive a brand image. Much like Johnson & Johnson — who has not only managed to overcome some very difficult situations, but has also managedmaintain its status as a household name, muchbecause of its well formed credo –Yohn’s book “is an examination of how great brands manage to avoid the fate of Kodiak and other faded companies by using their brands as management tools to fuel, align, and guide every person in the organization and every task they undertake.”

            6. Triggers: 30 Sales Tools you can use to Control the Mind of your Prospect to Motivate, Influence and Persuade — by Joseph Sugarman

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            triggers

              Even though we live in a technologically advance world, insales and marketing you cannotignore thebasics of the human psyche. Take QVC–owned by Liberty Media Corporation — for example. QVC has done an excellent job of creating acalamity which triggers consumers to buy something they don’t want or need just because of how the QVC salesperson presents the items. Sugarman’s bookdelves deep into the psyche to show youhow “using a trigger and changing just a few words” can create a huge response to your product or service.

              7. Decoding the New Consumer Mind: How and Why We Shop and Buy — by Kit Yarrow

              decoding

                As people have become more consumed with technology, they have become less focused on human interaction: increasing everydayanxiety and definitivelychanging consumer behavior.Yarrow very cleverly focuses on “three fast-developing sociocultural shifts, each reinforced by the others, have transformed customers over the last decade,” and teaches you “four marketing strategies on how to meet them.”

                8. Hooked: How to Build Habit- Forming Products — by Nir Eyal and RyanHoover

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                hooked

                  Human beings are creatures of habit. Think about it, this morning on your way to work you probably stopped by a Starbucks to purchase an over priced morning jolt of java. You probably didn’t even think of going to another coffee spot — and thus Starbucks has successfully mastered a“habit-forming product-design” which “makes their goods indispensable.” Eyal’s book very cleverly teaches you how to trigger themind into believing you or your product is indispensable.

                  9. Ultimate Guide to Google Ad Words: How to Access 100 Million People in 10 Minutes — by Perry Marshall and Bryan Todd

                  google

                    You can’t have a top 10 Best Marketing Books list without a book about Google — yawn. However, the best thing about Marshall and Todd’s book is that is very easy to follow and specifically teaches you how to used Google to your advantage whether you’re just beginning your Google experience or you’re well versed with Google. And just as a reminder, “Google gets searched more than 1 billion times everyday. That’s 720,000 searches a minute. Google can bring thousands of visitors to your website, 24hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year…whether you’re taking a shower, eating breakfast, driving to work, picking up your kids at school, taking a phone call, sleeping, sitting onthe commode, daydreaming, busting your butt to beat a deadline, chasing some customer, typing an email message…And it all can happen on autopilot : 100 percent predictable and completely consistent, like clockwork.”

                    10. The 60-Second Sales Hook: How To Stand Out And Sell More Using the Power Of Your Story — by Kevin Rogers

                    hook

                      Back in the day, when I was working in marketing– insert RUN DMC song here — one of my mentors told me we are all story tellers. If we tell a good story, then we will get good results. If we tella bad story, then we will not get such good results. This is the premise of Roger’s book, that “when your selling your product, the best story to tell is your own.” Roger’s teaches you how to sell by using your own story — well.

                      Featured photo credit: Fotocitizen via pixabay.com

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                      Last Updated on March 29, 2021

                      5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

                      5 Types of Horrible Bosses and How to Beat Them All

                      When I left university I took a job immediately, I had been lucky as I had spent a year earning almost nothing as an intern so I was offered a role. On my first day I found that I had not been allocated a desk, there was no one to greet me so I was left for some hours ignored. I happened to snipe about this to another employee at the coffee machine two things happened. The first was that the person I had complained to was my new manager’s wife, and the second was, in his own words, ‘that he would come down on me like a ton of bricks if I crossed him…’

                      What a great start to a job! I had moved to a new city, and had been at work for less than a morning when I had my first run in with the first style of bad manager. I didn’t stay long enough to find out what Mr Agressive would do next. Bad managers are a major issue. Research from Approved Index shows that more than four in ten employees (42%) state that they have previously quit a job because of a bad manager.

                      The Dream Type Of Manager

                      My best manager was a total opposite. A man who had been the head of the UK tax system and was working his retirement running a company I was a very junior and green employee for. I made a stupid mistake, one which cost a lot of time and money and I felt I was going to be sacked without doubt.

                      I was nervous, beating myself up about what I had done, what would happen. At the end of the day I was called to his office, he had made me wait and I had spent that day talking to other employees, trying to understand where I had gone wrong. It had been a simple mistyped line of code which sent a massive print job out totally wrong. I learn how I should have done it and I fretted.

                      My boss asked me to step into his office, he asked me to sit down. “Do you know what you did?” I babbled, yes, I had been stupid, I had not double-checked or asked for advice when I was doing something I had not really understood. It was totally my fault. He paused. “Will you do that again?” Of course I told him I would not, I would always double check, ask for help and not try to be so clever when I was not!

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                      “Okay…”

                      That was it. I paused and asked, should I clear my desk. He smiled. “You have learnt a valuable lesson, I can be sure that you will never make a mistake like that again. Why would I want to get rid of an employee who knows that?”

                      I stayed with that company for many years, the way I was treated was a real object lesson in good management. Sadly, far too many poor managers exist out there.

                      The Complete Catalogue of Bad Managers

                      The Bully

                      My first boss fitted into the classic bully class. This is so often the ‘old school’ management by power style. I encountered this style again in the retail sector where one manager felt the only way to get the best from staff was to bawl and yell.

                      However, like so many bullies you will often find that this can be someone who either knows no better or is under stress and they are themselves running scared of the situation they have found themselves in.

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                      The Invisible Boss

                      This can either present itself as management from afar (usually the golf course or ‘important meetings) or just a boss who is too busy being important to deal with their staff.

                      It can feel refreshing as you will often have almost total freedom with your manager taking little or no interest in your activities, however you will soon find that you also lack the support that a good manager will provide. Without direction you may feel you are doing well just to find that you are not delivering against expectations you were not told about and suddenly it is all your fault.

                      The Micro Manager

                      The frustration of having a manager who feels the need to be involved in everything you do. The polar opposite to the Invisible Boss you will feel that there is no trust in your work as they will want to meddle in everything you do.

                      Dealing with the micro-manager can be difficult. Often their management style comes from their own insecurity. You can try confronting them, tell them that you can do your job however in many cases this will not succeed and can in fact make things worse.

                      The Over Promoted Boss

                      The Over promoted boss categorises someone who has no idea. They have found themselves in a management position through service, family or some corporate mystery. They are people who are not only highly unqualified to be managers they will generally be unable to do even your job.

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                      You can find yourself persistently frustrated by the situation you are in, however it can seem impossible to get out without handing over your resignation.

                      The Credit Stealer

                      The credit stealer is the boss who will never publically acknowledge the work you do. You will put in the extra hours working on a project and you know that, in the ‘big meeting’ it will be your credit stealing boss who will take all of the credit!

                      Again it is demoralising, you see all of the credit for your labour being stolen and this can often lead to good employees looking for new careers.

                      3 Essential Ways to Work (Cope) with Bad Managers

                      Whatever type of bad boss you have there are certain things that you can do to ensure that you get the recognition and protection you require to not only remain sane but to also build your career.

                      1. Keep evidence

                      Whether it is incidents with the bully or examples of projects you have completed with the credit stealer you will always be well served to keep notes and supporting evidence for projects you are working on.

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                      Buy your own notebook and ensure that you are always making notes, it becomes a habit and a very useful one as you have a constant reminder as well as somewhere to explore ideas.

                      Importantly, if you do have to go to HR or stand-up for yourself you will have clear records! Also, don’t always trust that corporate servers or emails will always be available or not tampered with. Keep your own content.

                      2. Hold regular meetings

                      Ensure that you make time for regular meetings with your boss. This is especially useful for the over-promoted or the invisible boss to allow you to ‘manage upwards’. Take charge where you can to set your objectives and use these meetings to set clear objectives and document the status of your work.

                      3. Stand your ground, but be ready to jump…

                      Remember that you don’t have to put up with poor management. If you have issues you should face them with your boss, maybe they do not know that they are coming across in a bad way.

                      However, be ready to recognise if the situation is not going to change. If that is the case, keep your head down and get working on polishing your CV! If it isn’t working, there will be something better out there for you!

                      Good luck!

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