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10 Surefire Ways To Boost Your Networking

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10 Surefire Ways To Boost Your Networking

Do you want to improve your networking skills? Many people struggle with shyness, awkwardness, and insincerity; check out 10 sure-fire ways to boost your networking skills.

1. Research The Event Before You Go

Before you attend an event where there will be people you don’t know, do your research. Figuring out the dress code and the theme of the event will help you to perfect your outfit, attitude, and approach. It will also help you to prepare some great conversation starters.

Mental preparation will help you to walk into a room feeling confident and comfortable instead of unsure.

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2. Describe Yourself Differently

Most people choose to describe themselves to strangers by saying their name and job. However, unless you have a unique name and a fascinating job, this probably won’t help the conversation go further.

Give them a little more to work with; provide a more general and mysterious description, offering the person a chance to ask you a few questions. A good way to do this is to say what your job consists of, rather than the title, or mention a quirky part of your job.

3. Focus On Others Instead Of Yourself

Lots of people consider themselves to be shy, and the number is increasing, going from 40% in 1995 to 50% in 2007.

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One easy way to get rid of shyness is to take the attention off of yourself and instead focus on the person you are networking with. Instead of feeling awkward and trying to stop feeling shy, put your attention on helping the other person to relax and feel comfortable.

4. Network With Everyone

At networking events, there are probably specific people that you want to talk to. While this could be beneficial to you, don’t cut off your other options; the event is likely filled with other people, partners, spouses, and children.

While you don’t need to speak to everyone, it can help you to get noticed by the people you want to speak to. Being polite and friendly to everyone guarantees that you will always make a great first impression.

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5. Prepare A Short Introduction

Preparing a short introduction will help to remove any fear of starting conversations and makes you more likely to make a good first impression.

Create a warm, friendly introduction, and follow this up with an interesting statement or two about yourself.  Don’t rehearse this in front of the mirror; these are simply statements about yourself. You want to seem genuine rather than insincere.

6. Work On Finding A Conversational Balance

It is important to find a good conversational balance; if you talk too much, you can seem brash and self-involved, and if you are very quiet you can seem disinterested. It is important to keep the conversation flowing, so try to make sure everyone is contributing equally.

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7. Focus On Super Connecting

Networking isn’t all about number one; it can be really beneficial to introduce people you know who could benefit from meeting each other. They will both be grateful for your assistance, and it is likely they will both try to assist you later – or even better, they may introduce you to people whom they know could help you.

8. Network With The Person Who Is Standing Alone

The easiest person to talk to at a networking event is the person alone. They could be very shy and they may be relieved that someone is talking to them. They will appreciate the gesture, and it is likely they will put an extra bit of effort into the conversation.

9. Smile To Make A Great Impression

First impressions mean a lot; according to research from Princeton University, people decide if you are trustworthy or not after looking at your face for 34 milliseconds. Make those milliseconds count by relaxing the muscles in your face and smiling.

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10. Finish The Conversation Gracefully

Don’t let the end of your conversation affect your networking for the worse; don’t interrupt anyone who is talking, have a reason for leaving, smile as you say goodbye, and shake hands if it is appropriate. Even though you are leaving, this guarantees the person will remember you as polite, pleasant, and genuine.

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Amy Johnson

Amy is a writer who blogs about relationships and lifestyle advice.

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Last Updated on January 13, 2022

How to Use Travel Time Effectively

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How to Use Travel Time Effectively

Most of us associate travel and time with what we’re going to do one we get to our destination. Planning and mapping out what to do once you arrive can certainly make for a more pleasurable vacation, but there are things you can do while you are on your way that can make it even better.

Sure, you can plan for the things you’re going to do on your vacation while you are travelling en route – but what about making use of that time for other things that you don’t usually do when you’re at home? You don’t need to have your gadgets with you to do it, and you can really connect with yourself if you take the time to manage your life while heading towards your vacation destination.

Here are some great tips to help you with your time management while you travel, some of which are more conventional than others. Nonetheless, you can find out what works best for you and apply them accordingly depending on when and how you are travelling.

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1. Take Your Time Getting There

As I write this, I’m on a flight to San Francisco. Flying is the fastest way to get from place to place, and for many people it’s really the only way to travel.

But I’ve often taken the train or ferry on trips so that I have extra time without distraction to get more done. I’m not worrying about navigation or lack of space to do what I want to do. Instead I’m able to focus on getting stuff done during the time I’ve got without feeling rushed. For example, when I took the train from Vancouver to Portland, it was an eight hour trip and I managed to get a ton of writing done and closed a lot of open loops. It also was less expensive than flying, which was a bonus.

Sometimes taking the long way to get somewhere on vacation can be the best thing for you to get somewhere with your life.

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2. Go Gadget-Free

This is going to be a tough one for a lot of you. But why do you need to bring your gadgets with you when you go on vacation? It isn’t be a bad idea to leave all but one of them behind, and only pull out that one when you absolutely need to do so. In some countries, you’d be wise to be discreet with them anyway since flaunting them in front of those that are less fortunate than you isn’t a good practice. While it may not seem like flaunting to you, in different cultures it can definitely come across that way.

If you can’t go gadget-free, then at least go Internet-free. If you use a task management app that requires syncing across your multiple devices to be effective, remember that if you only have the one device with you then it can be the “master device” for the time being and will store your data locally anyway. Just sync up when you get home.

3. Reflect and Prepare

Finally, going on any sort of excursion gives you the perfect opportunity to reflect on where you’ve been. The fact you have removed yourself from where you usually are can give you a perspective that you simply can’t get when you’re at home. You may want to journal your thoughts during this time – and by taking more time to get to your destination you’ll have more time to dig deeper into it.

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After a period of reflection – however long that happens to be – you can then begin to not only prepare for the rest of your travels, you can prepare for the rest of what happens afterward. The reflection period is important, though. You need to really know where you’ve been in order to properly look at where you want to be. Time away from things gives you that chance.

Conclusion

Traveling isn’t always about where you’re going and how quickly you can get there. In fact, it’s rarely about that at all.

More often it’s where you’re at in your head that will dictate how much you benefit from traveling. So don’t just go somewhere fast. Instead, take your time on the way there and take the time to connect with not only where you are but who are while you’re there.

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If you do that, you’ll have a better chance to be who you want to be when you leave.

Featured photo credit: bruce mars via unsplash.com

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