Advertising
Advertising

10 Signs You Are A Workaholic But Not A High Performer

10 Signs You Are A Workaholic But Not A High Performer

According to “Psychology Today”, the average person will spend 90,000 hours at work during their lifetime. That’s a lot of meeting for meetings to schedule your next meeting. I feel your pain too.

The truth is, we will spend A LOT of time at work. And unfortunately, not all companies have the culture or progressive mindset to create work-life balance within the workplace. According to the Quality of Working Life Report, 25% of employees say work is their main source of stress and 40% say their job is “very or extremely stressful.”

But the key here is to not wait for your company to create balance in your work life. Instead, you have the opportunity to take charge!

Because we all know stress + unhappiness + workaholic tendencies = low performer.

Don’t let this happen to you! Here are 10 signs you are a workaholic but not a high performer.

Advertising

1. You chase feverishly after nothing.

One of the most common signs you are a workaholic but not a high performer is that you work like a dog — long days, long weeks, long projects that seemingly focus on nothing tangible. It’s like watching a dog chase their tail.

High performing people are goal oriented, while workaholics are volume oriented. As in, “wow, look how much we accomplished” instead of “wow, look what we accomplished.”

As Henry David Thoreau put it, “What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.”

2. You never pull back on the throttle.

Go, go, go is your motto! Like life, energy is not infinite. However, workaholics will literally work themselves to exhaustion — and then try to work some more. High performers leverage awareness to know when to turn it up or down a notch.

3. You put everyone else’s needs before your own.

Don’t be a martyr. High performing people recognize and understand that it’s okay to put their needs in front of someone else from time to time because in doing so, they provide the best version of themselves.

Advertising

Workaholics, however, tend to be selfless in nature but in doing so often over-extend and create an unsustainable version of themselves.

4. You focus 100% of your energy on things you have absolutely no control over.

At the end of the day, time is really all we have in life. Unfortunately, workaholics will spend a majority of their time placing their energy into things they cannot control – income, outcomes, coworkers, etc.

High performers are naturally their own critical judges as they focus much of their time on their effort. They eat, breathe, and sleep the mantra “the best version of you.”

5. Your day is comprised of reacting to “things.”

When you walk into work every morning, do you go in with a game plan and build your day around the most important tasks, or do you let others dictate how your day will go? If it’s the latter, then you might be a workaholic. High performing people are the drivers of their schedule, workaholics sit shotgun.

Tony Robbins was once famously quoted asking the question, “How am I going to live today in order to create the tomorrow I am committed to?”

Advertising

Perhaps you should ask yourself this question too.

6. You allow others to determine your worth.

This is a tricky one, especially for Millennials. Workaholics crave external validation – supervisors, colleagues, and friends. They just want some praise! Unfortunately this is a very similar characteristic of Millennials, as many were raised during the “and you get a trophy for breathing” era.

High performers, on the other hand, recognize their own self-worth and thus create feedback loops to continue to develop and grow professionally. Again, being proactive instead of reactive.

As the great Walt Disney said, “The more you like yourself, the less you are like anyone else, which makes you unique.”

7. You constantly find yourself unhappy with your results, even after obtaining a goal.

If you use the word “enough” in a negative connotation in your work life, you are probably a workaholic. This isn’t good enough, I am not good enough, and there isn’t enough time in the day – enough, enough, enough…enough!

Advertising

High performing people value and recognize the margin needed for success regardless of whether it’s a little or a lot.

8. You become judgmental of your colleague’s work ethic.

Workaholics obviously put in a lot of extra hours at work “to get the job done.” However, in doing so, many often become judgmental of their counterparts, as they focus on quantity and not quality.

A high performer’s number one goal is to do business – and recognize that business will come in waves. A workaholic’s number one goal is to be busy, and if they feel other people aren’t “busy,” then they aren’t putting in maximum effort.

9. You eat every meal at your desk.

The key is to work smarter, not harder. Workaholics tend to believe harder is smarter, and because of that they don’t see the value in intermittent periods of renewal in their days. High performers know the value of taking time for themselves throughout the day, especially when it comes to replenishing energy stores.

10. You work all the time and hardly ever get promoted.

When it came to your last review time, were you passed up on a promotion? Did your supervisor use phrases like “you definitely worked a lot” or “you get a lot done,” but then struggled to pinpoint specific, impactful achievements of yours?

If this sounds like your last review, then you may be a workaholic too. High performers will frequently get promoted – not only because of what they did, but what they can do moving forward. And you can’t be visionary and talk about what you “can do” if you are stuck in the weeds all of the time.

More by this author

10 Things All Highly Successful People Do 10 Signs You Are A Workaholic But Not A High Performer The 5 Things You Should Never Do in a Race

Trending in Productivity

1 11 Inspirational Podcasts To Lift You Up 2 How to Not Get Distracted: 10 Practical Tips to Sharpen Your Focus 3 5 Steps To Move Out Of Stagnancy In Life 4 What are Goals? Achieve More By Changing Your Perspectives 5 50 Motivational Quotes for Work to Inspire Success

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Not Get Distracted: 10 Practical Tips to Sharpen Your Focus

How to Not Get Distracted: 10 Practical Tips to Sharpen Your Focus

You sit at your desk, ready to finally get some work done. “Okay, lets do this,” you think to yourself. You scroll over to Word (or Excel, or Office, etc.) and open up a fresh document. You have some idea of what needs to be done, but what happens next?

You write a few words down but just can’t stay focused. Then you say “Maybe I should wake myself up with something fun.” You go to Facebook, 20 minutes gone. Then comes Youtube, 60 minutes gone. Before you know it, lunchtime has come and half the day is gone.

Does this seem familiar? Do you ever find yourself wasting your day?

Well it doesn’t have to be this way, all you need to do is focus on finishing this article to find out how to not get distracted easily.

But before we move on to the tips, here’re some important notes you need to know:

  • Avoiding distraction is tough. You’re not alone when it comes to distractions. It’s not easy staying on task when you need to work for hours at a time, but some people are able to do it. The question is: why them and not you?
  • You were never taught how to focus. It’s funny how all throughout our school days we were never taught HOW to learn and be focused, even though that’s all we did. It was just assumed, and ultimately it was hit or miss on whether or not you ended up knowing how to do those things at all.
  • The tools to help master your ability to focus. Since everyone’s left to their own devices, it’s up to you to find ways to master your focus ability. That’s what these tips are for, so you can finally stay focused and on track with what we want to accomplish for ourselves.

So without further ado, let’s get started. 

1. Keep Your Vision and Goals in Mind

First things first, why do you even need to focus? Do you want to become a skilled guitar player? Do you want to write a novel? Do you want to start working from home?

Think about it.

Knowing why we need to stay focused can help us push through the tough and tedious parts of accomplishing our goals. That’s when our ability to focus is really tested and when it’s most needed.

2. Reduce the Chaos of Your Day by Focusing on 2 to 3 Important Tasks

If you have 20 tasks you need done everyday how effective do you think your focus ability will be? Terrible, right?

Advertising

You can’t expect to do those things with sophistication if you’re too scatterbrained to focus. You need to break it down to the essentials.

Focus on only doing 2-3 important tasks a day (even one is okay), but no more than that. It’s all you need to take steps towards accomplishing your goals. Slower is much better than giving up early because you took on too much, too early.

3. Do Those Tasks as Soon as Possible

In order to make sure you get those 2 to 3 tasks done, you need to do them early. This means as soon as you wake up, you’re already plotting how to do them.

So get up, use the bathroom, eat breakfast, and do it (Yes, BEFORE work is the best time to do it).

It’s tough, but waiting to do them only invites distraction to take over. Those distractions WILL come, and they will drain your willpower. This makes working on your goals harder to do, so don’t wait do work on your goals, do them as early as possible.

4. Focus on Only the Smallest Part of Your Work at a Time

An easy way to kill your focus is to see a goal for the big giant accomplishment that it is. Most goals will at least take a few weeks to months to accomplish, and knowing that can make it feel like it’ll take FOREVER to do.

This will cause you to do one of two things:

  • You become discouraged because the goal is too big; or
  • You fantasize about what it’ll feel like to achieve the goal

Either way is terrible for your focus and always a potential problem when focusing on the big picture or using visualization.

So what should you do? Focus on doing a very small, minimum amount of work instead.

For example, which seems easier:

Advertising

Writing 200 words per day or writing a minimum of 2 sentences per day?

20 pushups per day or a minimum of 1 pushup per day?

The key here is to use minimums. Chances are you’ll push past them.

Eventually your minimum will increase, and you’ll slowly improve your ability to stay focused on the bigger tasks.

5. Visualize Yourself Working

I briefly mentioned in tip #4 that visualization techniques can hurt you more than help you sometimes. But there is a proper way of using visualization, and it’s by visualizing yourself actually WORKING (not as if you’ve succeeded already).

Champion runners use this technique to great effect, usually by working backwards. They imagine themselves winning at first, then they act out the whole process in reverse, feeling and visualizing each step all the way to the beginning.

A quicker and more relevant way to apply this would be to imagine yourself doing a small part of the task at hand.

For instance, if you need to practice your guitar but it’s all the way across the room (let’s assume maximum laziness for the sake of this example), what should you do?

First, imagine standing up (really, think of the sensation of getting up and then do it). If you really imagined it, visualized and felt the act of standing up, then acting on that feeling will be easy.

Then repeat the visualization process with each step till you have that guitar in hand and you’re playing it. The process of focusing so intently on each step distracts you from how much you don’t want to do something, and the visualizations “ready your body” for each step you need done.

Advertising

All you need to do is apply this process to whatever it is you need to focus on, just start with the smallest motion you need to do.

6. Control Your Internal Distractions

Internal distractions are one of those problems you can’t really run away from. You need to find ways to prepare your mind for work, and find simple ways to keep it from straying to non-essential thoughts as well.

A good way to prime your mind for work is to have a dedicated work station. If you always work in a specific area, then your mind will associate that area with work related thoughts.

Simple enough, right? When you take breaks make sure to leave your work station, that way you’ll know when you’re “allowed” to let your thoughts roam free as well.

Deadlines are useful here also (use Pomodoro method for example, see tip #9). This method helps keep your mind from wandering around since you’ve got that looming deadline coming along.

Ultimately though, silencing those unwanted thoughts is all about getting some traction going. So instead of focusing on what’s happening internally, focus getting something done (anything!). Once you do that, you’ll see that all your thoughts will be about finishing your task.

7. Remove External Distractions

This tip is straightforward, just get away from things that distract you.

Is the television a distraction? Work in another room. Are the kids distracting you? Get up earlier and work before they wake up. Is the Internet distracting? Turn off the modem.

It’s usually obvious what you should do, but you still shouldn’t overlook this piece of advice.

8. Skip What You Don’t Know

This is a tip I don’t see often enough, if you hit a snag in your work then come back to it later. Focus your attention on what you CAN do, keep working “mindlessly” at all costs. All this means is that you should focus on the easy parts first.

Advertising

Eventually you can come back to the more difficult parts, and hopefully by then it’ll have come to you or you’ll have built up enough momentum that it won’t break your focus if you work on it.

9. Improve Your Discipline With Focus Practice

There’s a few focus exercises you can do to improve your overall discipline.

The first one is meditation, which is basically the definition of focus in practice. Think about it, you’re literally just sitting there doing nothing. It’s a great method for building focus ability, de-stressing, and giving you greater control over your emotions. You should definitely give meditation a shot.

The second exercise is the Pomodoro method. These are basically “focus sprints,” and each one is followed by a solid break. Like real sprints, you’ll get better and better at doing them over time. Each interval improves your ability to stay focused when it matters, so it’s more than worth your time to try this out.

10. Manage Your Momentum

Momentum is like a discipline lubricant‒it helps ease the process of sticking with goals. That’s why I think it’s important that we never take true breaks from our goals; we end up losing momentum and relying on discipline to get back on track (not an easy thing to do).

This means each and everyday we need to do something significant to further our goals (yes, even weekends and holidays). And when I say “significant,” I don’t necessarily mean a big task‒but rather, any task that brings us closer to our goals.

For instance, if your goal is to be a freelance writer, then write one single pitch on a weekend. If your goal is get healthy, then go for a short 5 minute walk even on Christmas day.

Nothing big, nothing crazy, only stuff that is significant enough to contribute to the success of your overall goal.

More Tips on Staying Focused

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Read Next