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10 Amazing Uses for Carboard Egg Containers You Have Never Thought About

10 Amazing Uses for Carboard Egg Containers You Have Never Thought About

If you buy eggs in cardboard containers, chances are that you end up recycling those cartons every week or so. Though it’s great that the cartons are being recycled instead of ending up in landfills, there are also ways to re-purpose them as handy household items. This is just a short list of 10 things you can do with your empty cartons: I’ve no doubt that your imagination could inspire you to come up with many of your own ideas as well.

1. Seed Starter

Seedlings

    Photo by HDC

    You’ve likely seen this one a thousand times before, but it really is a spectacular way to start seedlings in the spring. Poke a hole at the bottom of each cup so that excess moisture can drain, and then add in the potting/starting soil of your preference. Dampen the soil with water, poke a couple of holes in each section with the tip of a pencil or chopstick, and drop 1 or 2 of seeds into each hole. Sprinkle a bit more soil over them and put them in a sunny spot, ensuring that you keep the soil damp. You’ll soon have wee seedlings popping up, and once they’re about 4 inches tall, you can transfer them into your garden.

    You can either widen the holes at the bottom of the cups for root growth and then plant them directly into the earth outside, or you can use a spoon to gently lift out each seedling and plant them individually.

    2. Bulb Storage

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    flower bud

      Speaking of gardening goodness, if you live in a cooler zone, you may have discovered that many flower bulbs can’t be left in the earth over the winter, as they’ll die. When you dig up the bulbs in the autumn, you can pack them in these cardboard containers and store them in a cool, dry place until springtime. The containers will keep them separated, and the cardboard itself will draw any excess moisture from the plants so they don’t rot. Place a bulb or two into each cup, and when the carton is full, tie it closed with twine.

      Just be sure to label the bulbs carefully by adding tags to the string you’ve used to close the container: writing directly onto the carton isn’t recommended because any dampness will make the ink run.

      3. Fire Starter Pellets

      Firestarter

        Photo by Flitzy Phoebie

        Keep the butt ends of candles that have burned down, and then melt them all together in an old can or pot. Mix together sawdust, wood chips, and shredded paper, fill the egg cups halfway with the mixture, and then pour the melted wax into each egg cup. Once they’ve cooled and solidified, you can break them apart as individual fire-starters for campfires and fireplaces—just light one of the edges and the cup in your hearth, close to the kindling.

        4. Floral Lights

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        floral light

          A string of holiday lights can find a new purpose as a floral light set by adding egg cup flowers to it. Just snip  the corners of each egg cup to separate each section into a “petal”, and paint the blooms in the shade(s) of your choice. Poke a hole at the bottoms of them, and slip them over each bulb.

          5. Worm Food

          Vermicompost

            Photo by amymyou

            Do you vermicompost yet? Keeping a batch of red wiggler worms under your sink to compost your household veggie scraps is a great idea, and they do like to break down paper and cardboard. Tearing up your egg cartons and tossing them to your worm-friends to turn into compost takes care of waste while creating nourishing food for your garden.

            6. Shoe Rack Near the Door

            shoe rack

              This won’t keep your shoes organized, but it can be a big help to keep your floors clean on rainy days or during the wintertime: place the containers flat-side down so the rounded cup bits face upwards. After frolicking around outside, place your wet shoes on the cartons: the cardboard will absorb excess water, and any slush or mud will fall into the crevices between the cups, rather than onto your floor.

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              7. Mise en Place Cups

              place cups

                When you’re cooking or baking, there’s generally an array of ingredients that will get tossed into the masterpiece you’re whisking up. Instead of having a bunch of containers around you that will be opened and tipped into the pot as you work, consider measuring out the ingredients beforehand so they’re all ready by the time you begin.

                Cut the carton cups apart so they’re free-standing, and use them to measure out up to 1/4 cup of dry ingredients, such as herbs, spices, baking powder, etc. Just don’t use them for very runny liquid ingredients, as the cups are absorbent and will throw off your measures. Thicker wet ingredients like cream, yoghurt, etc. are okay.

                8. Craft Supply Sorting

                Crafts

                  Photo by quadrapop

                  This is great for crafty folks of all ages: those tidy little egg cups are perfect for keeping craft materials sorted as you work on a project. Sort your beads into different sections if you’re working on a necklace; keep your stamps and ribbons handy if you’re scrapbooking; make sure your gems don’t roll away if you’re bedazzling the hell out of a denim jacket. Whatever your means of creative expression, a carton can be your best friend.

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                  9. Paint Palette for Kids

                  Palette

                    Photo by Jenn Mau

                    These cardboard cartons are ideal for holding childrens’ tempera paints. Just pour a different colour into each cup, give the kid some brushes and large sheets of paper, and let them express their creative genius. Smocks are probably a good idea, as are drop-cloths. And plastic sheeting on the furniture.

                    As a side note, you can also hang onto the eggshells themselves: they’re also great for starting herb seedlings in, and if they’re a bit mangled and crunchy, you can grind them up and toss them into your garden as a calcium supplement for the soil.

                    10. Jewellery Organizer

                    jewellery container

                      If you find that your jewellery drawer is a complete mess, with necklaces all tangled up together and earrings missing all over the place, just put one of those cartons to good use to organize it all. Once you’ve untangled the chains, coil one inside each cup to keep them separated. Individual pendants can be kept in another cup, and pairs of small holes can be poked in the upper portions of the cup walls to keep your earrings from going AWOL. Make horizontal slices in the tops of the posts that separate the cups and tuck your rings into them to keep them in place as well.

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                      Last Updated on March 13, 2019

                      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                      How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

                      Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

                      You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

                      Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

                      1. Work on the small tasks.

                      When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

                      Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

                      2. Take a break from your work desk.

                      Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

                      Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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                      3. Upgrade yourself

                      Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

                      The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

                      4. Talk to a friend.

                      Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

                      Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

                      5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

                      If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

                      Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

                      Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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                      6. Paint a vision to work towards.

                      If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

                      Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

                      Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

                      7. Read a book (or blog).

                      The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

                      Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

                      Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

                      8. Have a quick nap.

                      If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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                      9. Remember why you are doing this.

                      Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

                      What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

                      10. Find some competition.

                      Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

                      Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

                      11. Go exercise.

                      Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

                      Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

                      As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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                      Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

                      12. Take a good break.

                      Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

                      Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

                      Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

                      Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

                      More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

                      Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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