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6 Vintage and Energy-Saving Ways To Stay Warm This Winter

6 Vintage and Energy-Saving Ways To Stay Warm This Winter

The days are getting shorter and the nights are getting colder. It’s important to keep yourself warm during these unbearably chilly months. While central heating is a fantastic way to heat up the home, there are other more old-fashioned ways of staying warm, that will not only save money, but energy too. Here are six vintage ways to keep yourself warm inside and outside the home this winter.

1. Draught excluder cushion

draught-excluder-cushions

    These long cushions are perfect for stopping pesky, chilly winds from seeping through door cracks. Draught excluders are inexpensive, often come in very cute designs and are good way to keep the home insulated. According to the Energy Saving Trust, they can save you between £25 to £50 a year! And what’s more, draught excluders also help stop spiders and other creepy crawlies from getting into the home.

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    2. Hot water bottle

    hot-water-bottles

      Hot water bottles are one of life’s greatest inventions. A hot water bottle, also known as a “hottie”, is a rubber container filled with boiling water that you place on your bed to warm up, or a part of your body that is extra cold. Most people use a fluffy or knitted cover on their bottle to keep it soft, there are hundreds of designs to choose from.

      Heating the bed has been a practice since the 16th century, back then coal embers were used. Not long after that, hot water bottles made of materials such as copper and zinc came into existence. It was in 1903 that the first “hottie” made from rubber or PVC was introduced to the world.

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      3. Drink something hot

      hot-drink

        A soothing hot drink will warm you up from within. It takes just minutes to boil the kettle, or heat up some water in a saucepan. There are also a host of health benefits that come with drinking hot beverages. It helps to improve blood circulation, slow down ageing and detoxify your body. Hot drinks are best consumed in the morning, as they give your digestive system a good kick into gear.

        4. Layer up

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        layer-up-in-winter

          The best way to stop yourself from catching a chill is to layer your clothes. Delve into your wardrobe and find your cosiest jumpers and thickest socks. If you’re wearing trousers but your legs still feel cold, simply wear a pair of tights or tracksuits underneath, no one will see the difference, but you will certainly feel a difference in temperature. Vintage shops and flea markets have an abundance of sweatshirts, jumpers, scarves and faux fur coats available at incredible prices. Look stylish whilst staying warm.

          5. Insulate your home

          water-heater-jacket

            It’s the small things you do that have the biggest impact. Make sure you close your curtains early in the evening to keep the heat in. Also, close all doors around the home, this way the warmth will stay in each room and be more condensed. If you have wooden floorboards, be sure to fill any gaps, laying down a rug would be a good idea too. Also, try wrapping your hot water tank in an 80 mm jacket. These steps are incredibly easy to do and will have an invaluable effect on the temperature of your home.

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            6. Get baking

            baking-in-oven

              Believe it or not, your oven is one of the biggest sources of heat in your home. If you’re feeling the chill, turn on the oven and do some baking. This will also raise your overall body temperature because you will be moving around the kitchen, whisking, stirring and hunting through all your cupboards for those elusive ingredients like salt and baking powder.

              And why not kill two birds with one stone, and prepare one of these 5 retro Christmas food and drinks, all guaranteed to go down as a treat with your guests, and offer them a memorable journey in time?

              Featured photo credit: spectator.co.uk via blogs.spectator.co.uk

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              Last Updated on March 13, 2019

              How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

              How to Get out of a Rut: 12 Useful Ways to Get Unstuck

              Have you gotten into a rut before? Or are you in a rut right now?

              You know you’re in a rut when you run out of ideas and inspiration. I personally see a rut as a productivity vacuum. It might very well be a reason why you aren’t getting results. Even as you spend more time on your work, you can’t seem to get anything constructive done. While I’m normally productive, I get into occasional ruts (especially when I’ve been working back-to-back without rest). During those times, I can spend an entire day in front of the computer and get nothing done. It can be quite frustrating.

              Over time, I have tried and found several methods that are helpful to pull me out of a rut. If you experience ruts too, whether as a working professional, a writer, a blogger, a student or other work, you will find these useful. Here are 12 of my personal tips to get out of ruts:

              1. Work on the small tasks.

              When you are in a rut, tackle it by starting small. Clear away your smaller tasks which have been piling up. Reply to your emails, organize your documents, declutter your work space, and reply to private messages.

              Whenever I finish doing that, I generate a positive momentum which I bring forward to my work.

              2. Take a break from your work desk.

              Get yourself away from your desk and go take a walk. Go to the washroom, walk around the office, go out and get a snack.

              Your mind is too bogged down and needs some airing. Sometimes I get new ideas right after I walk away from my computer.

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              3. Upgrade yourself

              Take the down time to upgrade yourself. Go to a seminar. Read up on new materials (#7). Pick up a new language. Or any of the 42 ways here to improve yourself.

              The modern computer uses different typefaces because Steve Jobs dropped in on a calligraphy class back in college. How’s that for inspiration?

              4. Talk to a friend.

              Talk to someone and get your mind off work for a while.

              Talk about anything, from casual chatting to a deep conversation about something you really care about. You will be surprised at how the short encounter can be rejuvenating in its own way.

              5. Forget about trying to be perfect.

              If you are in a rut, the last thing you want to do is step on your own toes with perfectionist tendencies.

              Just start small. Do what you can, at your own pace. Let yourself make mistakes.

              Soon, a little trickle of inspiration will come. And then it’ll build up with more trickles. Before you know it, you have a whole stream of ideas.

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              6. Paint a vision to work towards.

              If you are continuously getting in a rut with your work, maybe there’s no vision inspiring you to move forward.

              Think about why you are doing this, and what you are doing it for. What is the end vision in mind?

              Make it as vivid as possible. Make sure it’s a vision that inspires you and use that to trigger you to action.

              7. Read a book (or blog).

              The things we read are like food to our brain. If you are out of ideas, it’s time to feed your brain with great materials.

              Here’s a list of 40 books you can start off with. Stock your browser with only the feeds of high quality blogs, such as Lifehack.org, DumbLittleMan, Seth Godin’s Blog, Tim Ferris’ Blog, Zen Habits or The Personal Excellence Blog.

              Check out the best selling books; those are generally packed with great wisdom.

              8. Have a quick nap.

              If you are at home, take a quick nap for about 20-30 minutes. This clears up your mind and gives you a quick boost. Nothing quite like starting off on a fresh start after catching up on sleep.

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              9. Remember why you are doing this.

              Sometimes we lose sight of why we do what we do, and after a while we become jaded. A quick refresher on why you even started on this project will help.

              What were you thinking when you thought of doing this? Retrace your thoughts back to that moment. Recall why you are doing this. Then reconnect with your muse.

              10. Find some competition.

              Nothing quite like healthy competition to spur us forward. If you are out of ideas, then check up on what people are doing in your space.

              Colleagues at work, competitors in the industry, competitors’ products and websites, networking conventions.. you get the drill.

              11. Go exercise.

              Since you are not making headway at work, might as well spend the time shaping yourself up.

              Sometimes we work so much that we neglect our health and fitness. Go jog, swim, cycle, whichever exercise you prefer.

              As you improve your physical health, your mental health will improve, too. The different facets of ourselves are all interlinked.

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              Here’re 15 Tips to Restart the Exercise Habit (and How to Keep It).

              12. Take a good break.

              Ruts are usually signs that you have been working too long and too hard. It’s time to get a break.

              Beyond the quick tips above, arrange for a 1-day or 2-days of break from your work. Don’t check your (work) emails or do anything work-related. Relax and do your favorite activities. You will return to your work recharged and ready to start.

              Contrary to popular belief, the world will not end from taking a break from your work. In fact, you will be much more ready to make an impact after proper rest. My best ideas and inspiration always hit me whenever I’m away from my work.

              Take a look at this to learn the importance of rest: The Importance of Scheduling Downtime

              More Resources About Getting out of a Rut

              Featured photo credit: Joshua Earle via unsplash.com

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