Advertising
Advertising

What the Cop Show “Blue Bloods” Can Teach You About Crafting Great Emails

What the Cop Show “Blue Bloods” Can Teach You About Crafting Great Emails

The CBS hit series Blue Bloods stars Tom Selleck as New York City Police Commissioner Frank Reagan, doing a perfect New York accent. (Just kidding about that last part.)

In a terrific scene, Commissioner Reagan is giving a press conference when a snooty reporter interrupts to ask about a controversial police shooting (involving the commissioner’s own police-officer son). Did Officer Reagan have to kill the man? Was it really necessary? That sort of thing. Here’s the brief exchange that follows. (I’m paraphrasing the dialogue.)

Commissioner Reagan: Okay, let’s pretend for a moment that instead of aiming his gun at a group of schoolchildren, as he was, the gunman is aiming at you. What do you do?

Snooty Reporter: Well, first, I’d… I guess I would want to know—

Commissioner Reagan: Too late. You’re dead.

Advertising

What can this teach us about writing better emails (and improving our writing generally)? A lot.

You have only seconds to capture your readers’ attention.

You’re busy. Your readers are, too. And their fingers are always poised over the mouse or mobile screen—ready to switch to something else the instant they start sensing that whatever they’re reading is a waste of their precious time.

As I see it, anything we write these days is like a billboard posted on a highway with no speed limit. You have only enough space for a few words, and your readers are zooming by at 100 miles per hour anyway. So you’d better craft a message that captures their attention immediately, and then painstakingly refine and edit to ensure you’re not wasting your readers’ time at any point.

Here are three tips to help you craft emails that earn and keep your readers’ attention.

1. Limit the text of your email to one screen.

First impressions matter. One reason I used a TV show to find a metaphor for writing better emails is that, although we never think of it this way, email is before anything else visual. In the first instant after they open your message, your readers visually take in the entire email to decide whether or not they want to read it. Think of your recipient taking a mental photo of your message to form a first impression of it. What do you want in that photo?

Advertising

If your text is too long to be viewed within the initial screen, your recipient’s first impression will likely be that reading your message is “work.” If they’re focused on anything else at the time, chances are they will close your message to deal with it later. Worse, when they re-open your email, it will turn them off all over again.

Your message should be only as long as you need to communicate the pertinent information to your recipient. If you need more than a full email screen, you’re better off with a different form of communication.

2. Make each paragraph no more than a few lines.

Second impressions matter, too. Long, blocky paragraphs are a big turnoff and tend not to get read right away. Worse, readers tend to zone out as their eyes and mind are forced to do double-duty, trying simultaneously to focus on the substance and also trying to hold their place in the paragraph.

Keeping your paragraphs short also shows respect for your email recipients’ time. Your readers will recognize (although perhaps only subconsciously) that you are taking time crafting the email—chipping away at all but the essential details—to save them time reading it.

Over time, this thoughtful strategy will teach your email recipients to view your emails with more trust and greater priority.

Advertising

3. Clearly state your objective or request for action.

Have you ever finished reading an email and thought: What am I supposed to do with this?

If you want your recipient to take action, make your request explicit—in terms of what you need and when you need it. One great way to do this is to make your request stand out physically in the message—by including it on a line all by itself.

“Please make your edits to the attached draft and send it back this week.”

or…

“I need your bio (50 words max) by Friday, June 12, at 12:00pm.”

Advertising

You can even bold your action request, if it’s short enough. That way, your recipient can scan your message and, within just a second or two, know exactly what you need. And that’s yet another way of showing your readers that you respect their time.

As you’re crafting any email, always keep in mind how busy and distracted your recipients are—and how quickly you need to capture their attention, with both the substance and the visual layout of your message.

Otherwise, to quote that great line from Commissioner Reagan, delivered by Tom Selleck showing his tremendous acting range (kidding again), it won’t matter how well written or important your email is. As far as your recipients will be concerned, “Too late. You’re dead.”

More by this author

robbie hyman

Copywriter

3 big mistakes creative freelancers make with their careers 2 Lessons in the Movie Rudy that Can Change Your Life Words and Phrases to Avoid in Your Professional Writing Freelancers And Consultants: 3 Reasons You Shouldn’t be Billing Hourly Why Money Might Not Be As Important to You As You Think

Trending in Communication

1 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 2 Feeling Stuck in Life? How to Never Get Stuck Again 3 12 Things You Should Remember When Feeling Lost in Life 4 13 Ways Happy People Think and Feel Differently 5 How to Find Inner Peace and Lasting Happiness

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 21, 2020

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them

If I was a super hero I’d want my super power to be the ability to motivate everyone around me. Think of how many problems you could solve just by being able to motivate people towards their goals. You wouldn’t be frustrated by lazy co-workers. You wouldn’t be mad at your partner for wasting the weekend in front of the TV. Also, the more people around you are motivated toward their dreams, the more you can capitalize off their successes.

Being able to motivate people is key to your success at work, at home, and in the future because no one can achieve anything alone. We all need the help of others.

So, how to motivate people? Here are 7 ways to motivate others even you can do.

Advertising

1. Listen

Most people start out trying to motivate someone by giving them a lengthy speech, but this rarely works because motivation has to start inside others. The best way to motivate others is to start by listening to what they want to do. Find out what the person’s goals and dreams are. If it’s something you want to encourage, then continue through these steps.

2. Ask Open-Ended Questions

Open-ended questions are the best way to figure out what someone’s dreams are. If you can’t think of anything to ask, start with, “What have you always wanted to do?”

“Why do you want to do that?”

Advertising

“What makes you so excited about it?”

“How long has that been your dream?”

You need this information the help you with the following steps.

Advertising

3. Encourage

This is the most important step, because starting a dream is scary. People are so scared they will fail or look stupid, many never try to reach their goals, so this is where you come in. You must encourage them. Say things like, “I think you will be great at that.” Better yet, say, “I think your skills in X will help you succeed.” For example if you have a friend who wants to own a pet store, say, “You are so great with animals, I think you will be excellent at running a pet store.”

4. Ask About What the First Step Will Be

After you’ve encouraged them, find how they will start. If they don’t know, you can make suggestions, but it’s better to let the person figure out the first step themselves so they can be committed to the process.

5. Dream

This is the most fun step, because you can dream about success. Say things like, “Wouldn’t it be cool if your business took off, and you didn’t have to work at that job you hate?” By allowing others to dream, you solidify the motivation in place and connect their dreams to a future reality.

Advertising

6. Ask How You Can Help

Most of the time, others won’t need anything from you, but it’s always good to offer. Just letting the person know you’re there will help motivate them to start. And, who knows, maybe your skills can help.

7. Follow Up

Periodically, over the course of the next year, ask them how their goal is going. This way you can find out what progress has been made. You may need to do the seven steps again, or they may need motivation in another area of their life.

Final Thoughts

By following these seven steps, you’ll be able to encourage the people around you to achieve their dreams and goals. In return, you’ll be more passionate about getting to your goals, you’ll be surrounded by successful people, and others will want to help you reach your dreams …

Oh, and you’ll become a motivational super hero. Time to get a cape!

More on Motivation

Featured photo credit: Thought Catalog via unsplash.com

Read Next