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10 Common Beliefs You Probably Have Wrong

10 Common Beliefs You Probably Have Wrong

It’s very easy for us to hear something and believe it without question. After all, if a lot of people say that they fully believe it, then it must be true, right?

It turns out that this kind of thinking is wrong. The number of believers does not necessarily count in validating the credibility of a belief. It’s the scientific data and the historical facts that really matter.

Which common beliefs are actually wrong? Here are ten of them.

Wrong: We only have five senses.

Right: We actually have at least nine senses, while most scientists believe that we have around 21. 

Basically, a “sense” is a sensory system that responds to physical stimulation and corresponds to a particular brain region that receives and interprets the signals. Aside from the senses of sight, sound, smell, taste and touch, there are also the senses of itching, thermoception, thirst and hunger, among others.

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Wrong: Napoleon Bonaparte was a short man.

Right: He was actually measured as 5 feet 2 inches in French feet, which translates to 5 feet 7 inches in modern measurements. 

His nickname “The Little Corporal” is believed to be just a term of affection. It’s not really an indication of how people perceived his height.

Wrong: “Third World country” means poor or underdeveloped.

Right: A country considered as capitalist is First World; a country considered as communist is Second World; Third World countries are simply countries that are neither. 

Because the list of Third World countries included a lot that were underdeveloped, the common belief that all Third World countries are poor was born, even though many countries in this group are actually well developed.

Wrong: “Sushi” means raw fish.

Right: Sushi actually translates as “sour rice” or “vinegared rice”.

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Not all sushi includes raw fish.

Wrong: The Great Wall of China can be seen from the moon.

Right: None of the Apollo astronauts had any documented sightings of it. 

Even astronauts who orbit the Earth can barely see it. Additionally, International Space Station commander Chris Hadfield tried to find the Great Wall of China from space, but he was unable to do so due to it being “narrow and dun-colored”.

Wrong: Brain cells can never regenerate.

Right: In 1998, researchers from the Sahlgrenska University Hospital, in Sweden, and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, in La Jolla, California, found that brain cells in mature humans can actually regenerate.

It’s not the “regeneration” of a dead neuron, mind you. It’s “neurogenesis”, or the creation of new ones. In fact, neurogenesis happens only within the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ)—these areas of our brains can create new cells and initiate new cell growth. Because this common false belief is cleared up, a cure for Alzheimer’s may be discovered in the future.

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Wrong: Lightning never strikes the same spot twice.

Right: It’s actually common for lightning to strike the same place twice.

During thunderstorms, remember to stay away from high areas and trees. You see, the tallest place in an area is likely to be struck multiple times until the lightning moves to the next target. One favorite victim of lightning is the Empire State Building.

Wrong: Antibiotics can help you cure your common cold.

Right: The common cold is caused by a virus, whereas antibiotics are helpful only against bacteria. 

So, next time you are tempted to try an antibiotic because of this common belief, stop yourself. You don’t want to experience antibiotic resistance, do you?

Wrong: Jesus was born on December 25.

Right: It was never stated in the Bible that Jesus was born on the 25th of December. 

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It was Pope Julius the First who initiated this common belief—he declared in the year 350 CE that December 25 was the official Christmas date. It is believed that he chose December 25 because the day when Jesus was conceived was also believed to be on March 25. Nine months after that is Christmas Day.

Wrong: Fortune cookies come from China.

Right: Fortune cookies actually originated in Japan. 

This common belief was caused by the fact that many Americanized Chinese restaurants serve fortune cookies with their meals. The truth of the matter is, though, that authentic Chinese restaurants don’t really have fortune cookies. In fact, there’s no documented records of fortune cookies being invented in China. A researcher, Yasuko Nakamachi, was able to shed light on this belief by encountering a Tsujiura Senbei (fortune cookie) made by hand at a family-owned bakery (Sohonke Hogyokudo) in Kyoto, Japan. These cookies, which had fortune slips (omikuji), were sold in temples and shrines even before fortune cookies materialized in America.

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Last Updated on September 20, 2018

7 Powerful Questions To Find Out What You Want To Do With Your Life

7 Powerful Questions To Find Out What You Want To Do With Your Life

What do I want to do with my life? It’s a question all of us think about at one point or another.

For some, the answer comes easily. For others, it takes a lifetime to figure out.

It’s easy to just go through the motions and continue to do what’s comfortable and familiar. But for those of you who seek fulfillment, who want to do more, these questions will help you paint a clearer picture of what you want to do with your life.

1. What are the things I’m most passionate about?

The first step to living a more fulfilling life is to think about the things that you’re passionate about.

What do you love? What fulfills you? What “work” do you do that doesn’t feel like work? Maybe you enjoy writing, maybe you love working with animals or maybe you have a knack for photography.

The point is, figure out what you love doing, then do more of it.

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2. What are my greatest accomplishments in life so far?

Think about your past experiences and the things in your life you’re most proud of.

How did those accomplishments make you feel? Pretty darn good, right? So why not try and emulate those experiences and feelings?

If you ran a marathon once and loved the feeling you had afterwards, start training for another one. If your child grew up to be a star athlete or musician because of your teachings, then be a coach or mentor for other kids.

Continue to do the things that have been most fulfilling for you.

3. If my life had absolutely no limits, what would I choose to have and what would I choose to do?

Here’s a cool exercise: Think about what you would do if you had no limits.

If you had all the money and time in the world, where would you go? What would you do? Who would you spend time with?

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These answers can help you figure out what you want to do with your life. It doesn’t mean you need millions of dollars to be happy though.

What it does mean is answering these questions will help you set goals to reach certain milestones and create a path toward happiness and fulfillment. Which leads to our next question …

4. What are my goals in life?

Goals are a necessary component to set you up for a happy future. So answer these questions:

Once you figure out the answers to each of these, you’ll have a much better idea of what you should do with your life.

5. Whom do I admire most in the world?

Following the path of successful people can set you up for success.

Think about the people you respect and admire most. What are their best qualities? Why do you respect them? What can you learn from them?

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You’re the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with.[1] So don’t waste your time with people who hold you back from achieving your dreams.

Spend more time with happy, successful, optimistic people and you’ll become one of them.

6. What do I not like to do?

An important part of figuring out what you want to do with your life is honestly assessing what you don’t want to do.

What are the things you despise? What bugs you the most about your current job?

Maybe you hate meetings even though you sit through 6 hours of them every day. If that’s the case, find a job where you can work more independently.

The point is, if you want something to change in your life, you need to take action. Which leads to our final question …

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7. How hard am I willing to work to get what I want?

Great accomplishments never come easy. If you want to do great things with your life, you’re going to have to make a great effort. That will probably mean putting in more hours the average person, getting outside your comfort zone and learning as much as you can to achieve as much as you can.

But here’s the cool part: it’s often the journey that is the most fulfilling part. It’s during these seemingly small, insignificant moments that you’ll often find that “aha” moments that helps you answer the question,

“What do I want to do with my life?”

So take the first step toward improving your life. You won’t regret it.

Featured photo credit: Andrew Ly via unsplash.com

Reference

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