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10 Common Beliefs You Probably Have Wrong

10 Common Beliefs You Probably Have Wrong

It’s very easy for us to hear something and believe it without question. After all, if a lot of people say that they fully believe it, then it must be true, right?

It turns out that this kind of thinking is wrong. The number of believers does not necessarily count in validating the credibility of a belief. It’s the scientific data and the historical facts that really matter.

Which common beliefs are actually wrong? Here are ten of them.

Wrong: We only have five senses.

Right: We actually have at least nine senses, while most scientists believe that we have around 21. 

Basically, a “sense” is a sensory system that responds to physical stimulation and corresponds to a particular brain region that receives and interprets the signals. Aside from the senses of sight, sound, smell, taste and touch, there are also the senses of itching, thermoception, thirst and hunger, among others.

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Wrong: Napoleon Bonaparte was a short man.

Right: He was actually measured as 5 feet 2 inches in French feet, which translates to 5 feet 7 inches in modern measurements. 

His nickname “The Little Corporal” is believed to be just a term of affection. It’s not really an indication of how people perceived his height.

Wrong: “Third World country” means poor or underdeveloped.

Right: A country considered as capitalist is First World; a country considered as communist is Second World; Third World countries are simply countries that are neither. 

Because the list of Third World countries included a lot that were underdeveloped, the common belief that all Third World countries are poor was born, even though many countries in this group are actually well developed.

Wrong: “Sushi” means raw fish.

Right: Sushi actually translates as “sour rice” or “vinegared rice”.

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Not all sushi includes raw fish.

Wrong: The Great Wall of China can be seen from the moon.

Right: None of the Apollo astronauts had any documented sightings of it. 

Even astronauts who orbit the Earth can barely see it. Additionally, International Space Station commander Chris Hadfield tried to find the Great Wall of China from space, but he was unable to do so due to it being “narrow and dun-colored”.

Wrong: Brain cells can never regenerate.

Right: In 1998, researchers from the Sahlgrenska University Hospital, in Sweden, and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, in La Jolla, California, found that brain cells in mature humans can actually regenerate.

It’s not the “regeneration” of a dead neuron, mind you. It’s “neurogenesis”, or the creation of new ones. In fact, neurogenesis happens only within the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ)—these areas of our brains can create new cells and initiate new cell growth. Because this common false belief is cleared up, a cure for Alzheimer’s may be discovered in the future.

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Wrong: Lightning never strikes the same spot twice.

Right: It’s actually common for lightning to strike the same place twice.

During thunderstorms, remember to stay away from high areas and trees. You see, the tallest place in an area is likely to be struck multiple times until the lightning moves to the next target. One favorite victim of lightning is the Empire State Building.

Wrong: Antibiotics can help you cure your common cold.

Right: The common cold is caused by a virus, whereas antibiotics are helpful only against bacteria. 

So, next time you are tempted to try an antibiotic because of this common belief, stop yourself. You don’t want to experience antibiotic resistance, do you?

Wrong: Jesus was born on December 25.

Right: It was never stated in the Bible that Jesus was born on the 25th of December. 

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It was Pope Julius the First who initiated this common belief—he declared in the year 350 CE that December 25 was the official Christmas date. It is believed that he chose December 25 because the day when Jesus was conceived was also believed to be on March 25. Nine months after that is Christmas Day.

Wrong: Fortune cookies come from China.

Right: Fortune cookies actually originated in Japan. 

This common belief was caused by the fact that many Americanized Chinese restaurants serve fortune cookies with their meals. The truth of the matter is, though, that authentic Chinese restaurants don’t really have fortune cookies. In fact, there’s no documented records of fortune cookies being invented in China. A researcher, Yasuko Nakamachi, was able to shed light on this belief by encountering a Tsujiura Senbei (fortune cookie) made by hand at a family-owned bakery (Sohonke Hogyokudo) in Kyoto, Japan. These cookies, which had fortune slips (omikuji), were sold in temples and shrines even before fortune cookies materialized in America.

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Last Updated on January 18, 2019

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

7 Ways To Deal With Negative People

Some people will have a rain cloud hanging over them, no matter what the weather is outside. Their negative attitude is toxic to your own moods, and you probably feel like there is little you can do about it.

But that couldn’t be farther from the truth.

If you want to effectively deal with negative people and be a champion of positivity, then your best route is to take definite action through some of the steps below.

1. Limit the time you spend with them.

First, let’s get this out of the way. You can be more positive than a cartoon sponge, but even your enthusiasm has a chance of being afflicted by the constant negativity of a friend.

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In fact, negativity has been proven to damage your health physically, making you vulnerable to high levels of stress and even cardiac disease. There’s no reason to get hurt because of someone else’s bad mood.

Though this may be a little tricky depending on your situation, working to spend slightly less time around negative people will keep your own spirits from slipping as well.

2. Speak up for yourself.

Don’t just absorb the comments that you are being bombarded with, especially if they are about you. It’s wise to be quick to listen and slow to speak, but being too quiet can give the person the impression that you are accepting what’s being said.

3. Don’t pretend that their behavior is “OK.”

This is an easy trap to fall into. Point out to the person that their constant negativity isn’t a good thing. We don’t want to do this because it’s far easier to let someone sit in their woes, and we’d rather just stay out of it.

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But if you want the best for this person, avoid giving the false impression that their negativity is normal.

4. Don’t make their problems your problems.

Though I consider empathy a gift, it can be a dangerous thing. When we hear the complaints of a friend or family member, we typically start to take on their burdens with them.

This is a bad habit to get into, especially if this is a person who is almost exclusively negative. These types of people are prone to embellishing and altering a story in order to gain sympathy.

Why else would they be sharing this with you?

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5. Change the subject.

When you suspect that a conversation is starting to take a turn for the negative, be a champion of positivity by changing the subject. Of course, you have to do this without ignoring what the other person said.

Acknowledge their comment, but move the conversation forward before the euphoric pleasure gained from complaining takes hold of either of you.

6. Talk about solutions, not problems.

Sometimes, changing the subject isn’t an option if you want to deal with negative people, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still be positive.

I know that when someone begins dumping complaints on me, I have a hard time knowing exactly what to say. The key is to measure your responses as solution-based.

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You can do this by asking questions like, “Well, how could this be resolved?” or, “How do you think they feel about it?”

Use discernment to find an appropriate response that will help your friend manage their perspectives.

7. Leave them behind.

Sadly, there are times when we have to move on without these friends, especially if you have exhausted your best efforts toward building a positive relationship.

If this person is a family member, you can still have a functioning relationship with them, of course, but you may still have to limit the influence they have over your wellbeing.

That being said, what are some steps you’ve taken to deal with negative people? Let us know in the comments.

You may also want to read: How to Stop the Negative Spin of Thoughts, Emotions and Actions.

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