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You Can Remember And Apply Everything You Read (With This Learning Technique)

You Can Remember And Apply Everything You Read (With This Learning Technique)

Why do some people seem to have an uncanny knack for learning things quickly while you struggle? You even try gimmicks to memorize the information, everything from creating songs and catchy mnemonic devices to more extreme approaches such as listening to books on tape while you sleep and even weird visualization techniques.. but the information just won’t stick!

While learning styles may differ, there are similarities in the way the brain takes in and handles new information and that tidbit of knowledge can yield efficient strategies for learning new things.

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Understanding your brain

The human brain[1] consists of special cells called neurons, which are made up of several parts, including brain fibers known as dendrites. As you learn, dendrites grow and connect your brain cells to one another at contact points called synapses.[2] The larger your dendrites become, the more connections they make and more connections mean a greater storage capacity for your brain.

The caveat to this is that dendrites can only be produced and increased in size by building upon existing dendrites.[3] In other words, to acquire new knowledge, the brain must build upon existing information.

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Introducing the FeynmanTechnique

The Feynman Technique[4] is a mental model[5] named after the Nobel Prize Winning Physicist, Richard Feynman[6]. It is a technique he created that streamlines and simplifies the learning process. The method enables you to comprehend and remember almost anything. It is designed to help you understand difficult concepts and easily recall information you’ve already learned.

This technique complements and assists the brain’s natural process of building dendrites and increasing synapses.

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The process is surprisingly simple yet incredibly effective. It involves three simple steps:

  1. Read the information
  2. Write down key concepts and information you don’t know in simple easy-to-understand terms—as if you were going to teach it to someone else
  3. Refer back to the information source to review information if you get stuck or for particular concepts you don’t fully understand.

Why it works

You are probably not very impressed or convinced by this method as it seems so simple. However, its simplicity masks its true power. Consider how most people normally attack learning a new concept or try to study unfamiliar material for an exam. Nine times out of ten, you read the material a couple of times and then hope you remember it… How’s that working for you?

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This method is effective for a variety of reasons:

  •  It is active, meaning it requires the learner to actively engage in learning by doing something (writing) versus the more passive activity of simply sitting and reading. The brain is stimulated by the action of writing[7]
  • It requires a series of mental functions. In this method, you are not merely copying the material. You must understand and interpret what you are reading and then translate it into your own simplified personal language. The mere act of analyzing information and then simplifying it is a much more involved and mentally intensive act than most people realize.
  • Thinking like a teacher makes you a better learner. The concept is simple: when you understand an idea well enough to explain it to others, it helps you internalize it. Learning information from the posture of having to simplify it and give it to someone else is one of the best ways to ensure true comprehension[8].

Learning is an activity. It requires action on your part. Instead of employing elaborate and outlandish techniques requiring undue expenditures of time and energy try this researched and proven method. Read the material. Write it down in a simplified form, as if you are going to teach it to someone else and then review the source material to clear up any ambiguity. It’s as easy as one, two, three!

Featured photo credit: ViktorHanacek.cz via pexels.com

Reference

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Denise Hill

Denise shares about psychology and communication tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on November 19, 2019

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy

7 Signs That You’re Way Too Busy

“Busy” used to be a fair description of the typical schedule. More and more, though, “busy” simply doesn’t cut it.

“Busy” has been replaced with “too busy”, “far too busy”, or “absolutely buried.” It’s true that being productive often means being busy…but it’s only true up to a point.

As you likely know from personal experience, you can become so busy that you reach a tipping point…a point where your life tips over and falls apart because you can no longer withstand the weight of your commitments.

Once you’ve reached that point, it becomes fairly obvious that you’ve over-committed yourself.

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The trick, though, is to recognize the signs of “too busy” before you reach that tipping point. A little self-assessment and some proactive schedule-thinning can prevent you from having that meltdown.

To help you in that self-assessment, here are 7 signs that you’re way too busy:

1. You Can’t Remember the Last Time You Took a Day Off

Occasional periods of rest are not unproductive, they are essential to productivity. Extended periods of non-stop activity result in fatigue, and fatigue results in lower-quality output. As Sydney J. Harris once said,

“The time to relax is when you don’t have time for it.”

2. Those Closest to You Have Stopped Asking for Your Time

Why? They simply know that you have no time to give them. Your loved ones will be persistent for a long time, but once you reach the point where they’ve stopped asking, you’ve reached a dangerous level of busy.

3. Activities like Eating Are Always Done in Tandem with Other Tasks

If you constantly find yourself using meal times, car rides, etc. as times to catch up on emails, phone calls, or calendar readjustments, it’s time to lighten the load.

It’s one thing to use your time efficiently. It’s a whole different ballgame, though, when you have so little time that you can’t even focus on feeding yourself.

4. You’re Consistently More Tired When You Get up in the Morning Than You Are When You Go to Bed

One of the surest signs of an overloaded schedule is morning fatigue. This is a good indication that you’ve not rested well during the night, which is a good sign that you’ve got way too much on your mind.

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If you’ve got so much to do that you can’t even shut your mind down when you’re laying in bed, you’re too busy.

5. The Most Exercise You Get Is Sprinting from One Commitment to the Next

It’s proven that exercise promotes healthy lives. If you don’t care about that, that’s one thing. If you’d like to exercise, though, but you just don’t have time for it, you’re too busy.

If the closest thing you get to exercise is running from your office to your car because you’re late for your ninth appointment of the day, it’s time to slow down.

Try these 5 Ways to Find Time for Exercise.

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6. You Dread Getting up in the Morning

If your days are so crammed full that you literally dread even starting them, you’re too busy. A new day should hold at least a small level of refreshment and excitement. Scale back until you find that place again.

7. “Survival Mode” Is Your Only Mode

If you can’t remember what it feels like to be ahead of schedule, or at least “caught up”, you’re too busy.

So, How To Get out of Busyness?

Take a look at these articles to help you get unstuck:

Featured photo credit: Khara Woods via unsplash.com

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