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9 Game Changing Tips on How to Write Goals (and Reach Them!)

9 Game Changing Tips on How to Write Goals (and Reach Them!)

Try this quick thought experiment discussed by Sir John Hargrave in Mind Hacking: How to Change Your Mind for Good in 21 Days. Try to create a quick mental picture of yourself twenty years from now…

What do you see? Is it a blurry or fuzzy image? Is it like a puzzle with missing pieces?

How do we improve our vision or find the missing puzzle pieces?

I found 9 game changing tips on how to write goals and actually reach them.and split them into 3 categories to explain them: Questions to improve the image, simple rules, and feedback.

How to write goals and actually reach them

Let’s examine these 9 game changing tips on how to identify these missing pieces and how you can find them.

    Questions to improve the image — Your goal

    1. If — and — then (Killer tip!)

    IF we seek to identify goals to improve our life in twenty years from now — AND we see a blurry image in our mind — THEN we should use these powerful tips to write and action our goals.

    This is no different than computer coding. In How To Hack Your Brain and Reprogram Your Habits (Like a Computer), I discuss how to use this technique to overcome bad habits.

    Yet, this technique can also be used to write and action goals. Let’s examine how this works:

    IF x happens — THEN I will do y.

    IF = cause

    AND = necessary condition or correlation

    THEN = effect

    Example:

    IF: If I notice I have gained weight.

    AND: And I want to start exercising.

    THEN: I will create triggers to ensure I exercise every morning.

    To illustrate this point further, let’s examine an exercise trigger:

    IF: If I sleep in my (clean) running clothing.

    AND: And I use technology, such as the Pavlok Shock Clock to wake myself up in the morning.

    THEN: Then I will wake-up at 4am and run every morning.

    2. 80/20 Rule

    The 80/20 Rule (otherwise known as the Pareto principle) is the law of the vital few. It states that 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

      Inputs or Causes = 20%

      Outputs or Effects = 80%

      20% of our inputs cause 80% of our outputs. The key is to identify the 20% of your actions that are creating 80% of your rewards. If you are able to successfully identify the 20%, then only do those actions.

      Example:

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      If what you do 80% of the time only brings you 20% of your results, then stop doing those actions.

      If what you do 20% of the time brings you 80% of your results, then only perform those actions.

      Another example can be found in the workplace:

      If you perform the following tasks: 1) make phone calls, 2) check e-mail, 3) write long reports, 4) participate in long meetings, 5) visit work-site locations to improve a process, 6) visit work-site locations to identify problems, 7) speak with employees directly to identify problems, 8) spend long hours creating PowerPoint presentations, 9) micromanage employees tasks, 10) micromanage employees attendance, etc.

      And you determine that only 20% of these tasks produce 80% of the direct positive results to you and your organization. Then only perform those 20%.

      This means you might only perform the following: 5) visit work-site locations to improve a process and 6) visit work-site locations to identify problems.

      In Joel Runyon’s article about the 80/20 rule, he provides advice for a diet. He says,[1]

      “If you change 20% of the foods you eat, you’ll see absolutely massive results, particularly when you’re just starting to improve your diet for the first time.”

      3. What? — So What? — Now What? (Killer tip!)

      Developed in 1970 by Terry Borton, Borton’s Development Framework provides us a straightforward approach to anything by asking three simple questions: What?, So What?, Now What?

      In Razor-Sharp Thinking: The What-Why Method, I wrote about the power of this simple approach.

      What? The experience… What happened?

      So What? Why was it important… What is the bottom line up front (BLUF)?

      Now What? What are you going to do now?

      Example:

      What?

      What happened to trigger a new goal? Let’s say you find it hard to breath while walking.

      So What?

      This is the reason (or the why) to improve your health. If you find that you lose your breath while walking, and you are a smoker, then you have potentially identified the problem.

      Now What?

      This is your plan of action.

      For example: If you lose your breath while walking, and you are a smoker, then you need to quit smoking.

      Simple rules

      4. DSRP (Killer tip!)

      Systems Thinking v2.0 (DSRP) was developed by systems theorists Derek and Laura Cabrera. In Systems Thinking Made Simple: New Hope for Solving Wicked Problems, the Cabrera’s surmise,

      “We are astonished to learn that the breathtaking diversity and creativity of nature that produces peacocks, giraffes, and star-nosed moles is born of genetic mutations of the four nucleotides of DNA (ATCG). Much like the genetic code that underlies all species, DSRP provides a cognitive code that underlies human thinking.”

      DSRP is predicated on the idea that systems thinking is a complex adaptive system (CAS) with four underlying rules: Distinctions, Systems, Relationships, and Perspectives.

      DSRP is a way to use simple rules to understand difficult and confusing concepts. Let’s look at the simple rules with examples of how to use them in understanding the confusing concept of blockchain technology.

      Distinctions (Identity and Other)

      We must first identify what something is and what it is not.

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        Systems (Part and Whole)

        Once we have made clear distinctions we then examine the part-whole structure for blockchain and something else we are already knowledgeable with.

          Relationships (Cause and effect)

          After we analyze the part-whole structure for both concepts, we then look for relationships between ideas.

            Perspectives (Point and view)

            Finally, we can then examine the different perspectives of blockchain technology from a point (i.e. supply chain) and a view (i.e. smart contracts).

              5. VMCL (Killer tip!)

              Derek and Laura Cabrera have also developed simple rules for any organization in their most recent book Flock Not Clock: Align people, processes, and systems to achieve your vision.

              In fact, I used these simple rules to develop my vision (Emergent Learning by Swarming the Classroom) for courses I teach at Fort Hays State University (FHSU) in Hays, Kansas. Let’s take a look at these rules and examples of how you can use them.

              Vision (your desired future state or goal)

                Mission (our repeatable actions that bring about the vision… simple rules)

                  Capacity (our systems or processes that provide readiness to execute the mission)

                    Learning (our continuous improvements of systems of capacity based on feedback from the external environment)

                      Finally, here is a summary of VMCL for Emergent Learning.

                        6. Cynefin Framework

                          Developed by Dave Snowden, the Cynefin Framework is a conceptual way to assist decision makers in making decisions. For a detailed examination of the framework, I recommend reading my article How to Thrive in Chaos.

                          This framework provides simple rules (or domains) for identifying where a problem resides and the tools to use to solve a problem.

                          The Cynefin Framework is essentially 5 domains. Let’s briefly examine four of the five domains (leaving out disorder) with a description, a metaphor, and an example:

                          Simple (systems are stable and we can see clear cause-and-effect relationships)

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                          • Description: In this domain, the right answer to a problem is easy to identify.
                          • Metaphor: Playing Checkers
                          • Example: Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) in an organization can solve simple problems.

                          Complicated (a domain of experts where we know the information we need, but we don’t have the answers)

                          • Description: We have asked questions but have not received an answer.
                          • Metaphor: Playing Chess
                          • Example: The use of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in solving problems.

                          Complex (the information we need is out there somewhere, but we don’t know what we’re looking for)

                          • Description: The best way to determine if you have a Complex or Complicated system or problem is to figure out if you have an emergent complex adaptive system (CAS) – which will have a large number of agents interacting, learning, and adapting; thus, if you have a CAS, you are in the Complex domain.
                          • Metaphor: Playing Wei-chi (aka Go)
                          • Example: Using Systems Thinking v2.0 (DSRP) to solve complex (wicked) problems.

                          Chaotic (the realm of the unknown)

                          • Description: Possessing an understanding of cause-and-effect is useless.
                          • Metaphor: Playing Twister
                          • Example: First responders and the military have to train for all possible scenarios. In this domain, it is very important to train yourself so you do not freeze during an unexpected situation (such as an active shooter).

                          Feeedback

                          7. Cue — Routine — Reward

                          Charles Duhigg writes about a powerful habit loop in The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business. By understanding the habit loop, we can change bad habits by replacing them with healthy habits. The habit loop is a neurological loop consisting of the following:

                          • Cue: The cue is anything that triggers the habit. Think of this as a tripwire.
                          • Routine: This is the routine you wish to change (i.e. smoking).
                          • Reward: The reward is the reason for change. It is the positive reinforcement for the new behavior.

                          Duhigg provides the following tips to short-circuit the habit loop.

                          Let’s look at an example:

                          Step 1: Identify the routine

                          This is the behavior you wish to change. If you step on a scale and notice a large weight gain, then this will trigger the cue to lose weight.

                          Step 2: Experiment with rewards

                          Experiment with different rewards to see which one stick. If you write down every time you run — And you create a long chain of events — Then you will want to continue the chain (imagine a calendar with a string of check-marks illustrating how often you run).

                          Step 3: Isolate the cue

                          Duhigg says that we can ask ourselves (and record our answers) five things the moment an urge hits use in order to diagnose our habit:

                          1. Where are you?

                          2. What time is it?

                          3. What’s your emotional state?

                          4. Who else is around?

                          5. What action preceded the urge?

                          Step 4: Have a plan

                          Duhigg found once we figure out our habit loop, we are then able to shift our behavior.

                          “Put another way, a habit is a formula our brain automatically follows: When I see CUE, I will do ROUTINE in order to get a REWARD.” – Charles Duhigg

                          8. Algorithms (Killer tip!)

                          Algorithms are built off of and learn from feedback loops. This is why companies, such as Netflix and Spotify can successfuly recommend movies and music to you.

                          In Swipe to Unlock: A Primer on Technology and Business Strategy, the authors illustrate the algorithm and feedback loop Spotify uses. It is a computer algorithm to find songs that fit your profile.

                            The authors discuss the Discover Weekly algorithm that starts by looking at two basic pieces of information.

                            First, it looks at all songs you’ve listened to and liked enough to add to your library or playlists. They also mention that the algorithm is even smart enough to know if you skipped a song in the first 30 seconds.

                            Second, it looks at all the playlists others have made, with the assumption that each playlist has a thematic connection.

                            We can use computer algorithms, such as the Discover Weekly algorithm as an example of how to adapt and evolve our mental models. Our mental models are our own personal feedback loops and algorithms for how we live.

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                            In Flock Not Clock, Derek and Laura Cabrera write,

                            “When we interact with the real world, we receive feedback on the accuracy of our mental models. We adjust our mental models based on that feedback. Ideally, we refine our models to be better approximations of reality.”

                            Here is how this can work:

                              Our mental model (current knowledge) takes our present understanding of reality and approximates the real world (combined with current facts). This is the lens through which we view reality. Once we make the decision to act on our current knowledge, we then receive feedback from our environment. This feedback then changes our mental model — thus, this changes/revises our present knowledge. In essence, this is an algorithm for improvement.

                              9. OODA Loop

                                The OODA Loop was created by Colonel (Ret.) John Boyd. Without going into too much detail, I have adapted the OODA Loop as follows:

                                It is a high-speed decision making and feedback process using simple rules to upgrade your critical thinking skills for a sharper mind.

                                For a more detailed look at the OODA Loop, I recommend reading my article How to Upgrade Your Critical Thinking Skills for a Sharper Mind.

                                In its simplest form, the OODA Loop is a high-speed decision making and feedback process in four stages: Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act.

                                I am using the OODA Loop in my Emergent Learning concept as discussed in the VMCL portion of this article. I use it to move from information to understanding.

                                  Observe

                                  In my course at FHSU, I have my students digest information to receive data. Essentially, information is data. Think of information as a node in a systems diagram.

                                  Orient

                                  I then help my students orient to the information in an attempt to make sense of the information. Sense-making is the process of connecting information.

                                  Decide

                                  When we connect information (connecting two nodes) we bring about knowledge. The Cabrera’s provide the perfect equation for knowledge:

                                  Knowledge = Information x Thinking

                                  Thus, we can only bring about Knowledge when we introduce students to “Thinking”.

                                  Act

                                  To truly understand a concept, we must act. When we connect knowledge we attain wisdom. This is done through practical application of concepts.

                                  Final thoughts

                                  Lastly, my hope is that these 9 game changing tips will provide you a clear picture of your future vision or goals. These missing puzzle pieces should assist you in filling in those gaps in your mind.

                                  Just remember, use questions to improve your vision, use simple rules to guide you to your vision, and always look for feedback for improvement.

                                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                                  Reference

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                                  Dr. Jamie Schwandt

                                  Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt & Red Team Critical Thinker

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                                  Last Updated on September 18, 2019

                                  15 Best Organizing Tips For Office Organization and Getting More Done

                                  15 Best Organizing Tips For Office Organization and Getting More Done

                                  You may think that you don’t have time for office organization, but if you really knew how much time that disorganization cost you, you’d reconsider.

                                  Rearranging and moving piles occasionally doesn’t count. Neither does clearing off your desk, if you swipe the mess into a bin, or a desk drawer.

                                  A relatively neat and orderly office space clears the way for higher productivity and less wasted time.

                                  Organizing your office doesn’t have to take days, it can be done a little at a time. In fact, maintaining an organized office is much more effective if you treat it like an on-going project, instead of a massive assault.

                                  So, if you’re ready to get started, the following organizing tips will help you transform your office into an efficient workspace.

                                  1. Purge Your Office

                                  De-clutter, empty, shred, get rid of everything that you don’t need or want. Look around. What haven’t you used in a while?

                                  Take one area at a time. If it doesn’t work, send it out for repair or toss it. If you haven’t used it in months and can’t think of when you’ll actually need it, out it goes. This goes for furniture, equipment, supplies, etc.

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                                  Don’t forget about knick-knacks, plants (real or artificial), and decorations – if they’re covered with dust and make your office look shabby, they’re fair game.

                                  2. Gather and Redistribute

                                  Gather up every item that isn’t where it belongs and put it where it does.

                                  3. Establish Work “Zones”

                                  Decide what type of activity happens in each area of your office. You’ll probably have a main workspace (most likely your desk,) a reference area (filing cabinet, shelves, binders,) and a supply area (closet, shelves or drawers.)

                                  Place the appropriate equipment and supplies are located in the proper area as much as possible.

                                  4. Close Proximity

                                  Position the equipment and supplies that you use most within reach. Things that you rarely use can be stored or put away.

                                  5. Get a Good Labeler

                                  Choose a label maker that’s simple to use. Take the time to label shelves, bins, baskets drawers. Not only will it remind you where things go, but it will also help others who may have a need to find, use, or put away anything in your workspace.

                                  6. Revise Your Filing System

                                  As we move fully into the digital age, the need to store paper files has decreased.

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                                  What can your store digitally? Are you duplicating files? You may be able to eliminate some of the files and folders you’ve used in the past. If you’re storing files on your computer, make sure you are doing regular back-ups.

                                  Here’re some storage ideas for creating a smooth filing system:

                                  • Create a meeting folder – Put all “items to be discussed” in there along with items that need to be handed off, reports that need to be given, etc. It’ll help you be prepared for meetings and save you stress in the even that a meeting is moved up.
                                  • Create a WOR folder – So much of our messy papers are things that are on hold until someone else responds or acts. Corral them in a WOR (Waiting on Response) folder. Check it every few days for outstanding actions you may need to follow-up on.
                                  • Storage boxes – Use inexpensive storage boxes to keep archived files and get them out of your current file space.
                                  • Magazine boxes – Use magazine boxes or binders to store magazines and catalogs you really want to store. Please make sure you really need them for reference or research, otherwise recycle them, or give away.
                                  • Reading folder – Designate a file for print articles and documents you want to read that aren’t urgent.
                                  • Archive files – When a project is complete, put all of the materials together and file them away. Keep your “working folders” for projects in progress.
                                  • File weekly – Don’t let your filing pile up. Put your papers in a “To File” folder and file everything once a week.

                                  Learn more tips on organizing your files here: How to Organize Your Files for Better Productivity

                                  7. Clear off Your Desk

                                  Remove everything, clean it thoroughly and put back only those items that are essential for daily use.

                                  If you have difficulty declutter stuff, this Declutter Formula will help you throw away stuff without regretting later.

                                  8. Organize your Desktop

                                  Now that you’ve streamlined your desktop, it’s a good idea to organize it.

                                  Use desktop organizers or containers to organize the items on your desk. Use trays for papers, containers for smaller items.

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                                  Don’t forget your computer desktop! Make sure the files or images are all in organized folders. I’d recommend you clear your computer desktop everyday before you leave work.

                                  9. Organize Your Drawers

                                  Put items used together in the same drawer space, stamps with envelopes, sticky pads with notepads, etc.

                                  Use drawer organizers for little items – paper clips, tacks, etc. Use a separate drawer for personal items.

                                  10. Separate Inboxes

                                  If you work regularly with other people, create a folder, tray, or inbox for each.

                                  11. Clear Your Piles

                                  Hopefully with your new organized office, you won’t create piles of paper anymore, but you still have to sort through the old ones.

                                  Go through the pile (a little at a time if necessary) and put it in the appropriate place or dump it.

                                  12. Sort Mails

                                  Don’t just stick mail in a pile to be sorted or rifle through and take out the pieces you need right now. Sort it as soon as you get it – To act, To read, To file, To delegate or hand off. .

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                                  13. Assign Discard Dates

                                  You don’t need to keep every piece of paper indefinitely. Mark on files or documents when they can be tossed or shredded.

                                  Some legal or financial documents must be kept for specified length of time. Make sure you know what those requirements are.

                                  14. Filter Your Emails

                                  Some emails are important to read, others are just not that important.

                                  When you use the filter system to label different types of emails, you know their priority and which to reply first.

                                  Take a look at these tips to achieve inbox zero: The Ultimate Way to get to Inbox Zero

                                  15. Straighten Your Desk

                                  At the end of the day, do a quick straighten, so you have a clean start the next day.

                                  Bottom Line

                                  Use one tip or try them all. The amount of effort you put into creating and maintaining an efficient work area will pay off in a big way.

                                  Instead of spending time looking for things and shuffling piles, you’ll be able to spend your time…well…working and you’ll enjoy being clutter free!

                                  More Organizing Hacks

                                  Featured photo credit: Alesia Kazantceva via unsplash.com

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