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9 Game Changing Tips on How to Write Goals (and Reach Them!)

9 Game Changing Tips on How to Write Goals (and Reach Them!)

Try this quick thought experiment discussed by Sir John Hargrave in Mind Hacking: How to Change Your Mind for Good in 21 Days. Try to create a quick mental picture of yourself twenty years from now…

What do you see? Is it a blurry or fuzzy image? Is it like a puzzle with missing pieces?

How do we improve our vision or find the missing puzzle pieces?

I found 9 game changing tips on how to write goals and actually reach them.and split them into 3 categories to explain them: Questions to improve the image, simple rules, and feedback.

How to write goals and actually reach them

Let’s examine these 9 game changing tips on how to identify these missing pieces and how you can find them.

    Questions to improve the image — Your goal

    1. If — and — then (Killer tip!)

    IF we seek to identify goals to improve our life in twenty years from now — AND we see a blurry image in our mind — THEN we should use these powerful tips to write and action our goals.

    This is no different than computer coding. In How To Hack Your Brain and Reprogram Your Habits (Like a Computer), I discuss how to use this technique to overcome bad habits.

    Yet, this technique can also be used to write and action goals. Let’s examine how this works:

    IF x happens — THEN I will do y.

    IF = cause

    AND = necessary condition or correlation

    THEN = effect

    Example:

    IF: If I notice I have gained weight.

    AND: And I want to start exercising.

    THEN: I will create triggers to ensure I exercise every morning.

    To illustrate this point further, let’s examine an exercise trigger:

    IF: If I sleep in my (clean) running clothing.

    AND: And I use technology, such as the Pavlok Shock Clock to wake myself up in the morning.

    THEN: Then I will wake-up at 4am and run every morning.

    2. 80/20 Rule

    The 80/20 Rule (otherwise known as the Pareto principle) is the law of the vital few. It states that 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

      Inputs or Causes = 20%

      Outputs or Effects = 80%

      20% of our inputs cause 80% of our outputs. The key is to identify the 20% of your actions that are creating 80% of your rewards. If you are able to successfully identify the 20%, then only do those actions.

      Example:

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      If what you do 80% of the time only brings you 20% of your results, then stop doing those actions.

      If what you do 20% of the time brings you 80% of your results, then only perform those actions.

      Another example can be found in the workplace:

      If you perform the following tasks: 1) make phone calls, 2) check e-mail, 3) write long reports, 4) participate in long meetings, 5) visit work-site locations to improve a process, 6) visit work-site locations to identify problems, 7) speak with employees directly to identify problems, 8) spend long hours creating PowerPoint presentations, 9) micromanage employees tasks, 10) micromanage employees attendance, etc.

      And you determine that only 20% of these tasks produce 80% of the direct positive results to you and your organization. Then only perform those 20%.

      This means you might only perform the following: 5) visit work-site locations to improve a process and 6) visit work-site locations to identify problems.

      In Joel Runyon’s article about the 80/20 rule, he provides advice for a diet. He says,[1]

      “If you change 20% of the foods you eat, you’ll see absolutely massive results, particularly when you’re just starting to improve your diet for the first time.”

      3. What? — So What? — Now What? (Killer tip!)

      Developed in 1970 by Terry Borton, Borton’s Development Framework provides us a straightforward approach to anything by asking three simple questions: What?, So What?, Now What?

      In Razor-Sharp Thinking: The What-Why Method, I wrote about the power of this simple approach.

      What? The experience… What happened?

      So What? Why was it important… What is the bottom line up front (BLUF)?

      Now What? What are you going to do now?

      Example:

      What?

      What happened to trigger a new goal? Let’s say you find it hard to breath while walking.

      So What?

      This is the reason (or the why) to improve your health. If you find that you lose your breath while walking, and you are a smoker, then you have potentially identified the problem.

      Now What?

      This is your plan of action.

      For example: If you lose your breath while walking, and you are a smoker, then you need to quit smoking.

      Simple rules

      4. DSRP (Killer tip!)

      Systems Thinking v2.0 (DSRP) was developed by systems theorists Derek and Laura Cabrera. In Systems Thinking Made Simple: New Hope for Solving Wicked Problems, the Cabrera’s surmise,

      “We are astonished to learn that the breathtaking diversity and creativity of nature that produces peacocks, giraffes, and star-nosed moles is born of genetic mutations of the four nucleotides of DNA (ATCG). Much like the genetic code that underlies all species, DSRP provides a cognitive code that underlies human thinking.”

      DSRP is predicated on the idea that systems thinking is a complex adaptive system (CAS) with four underlying rules: Distinctions, Systems, Relationships, and Perspectives.

      DSRP is a way to use simple rules to understand difficult and confusing concepts. Let’s look at the simple rules with examples of how to use them in understanding the confusing concept of blockchain technology.

      Distinctions (Identity and Other)

      We must first identify what something is and what it is not.

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        Systems (Part and Whole)

        Once we have made clear distinctions we then examine the part-whole structure for blockchain and something else we are already knowledgeable with.

          Relationships (Cause and effect)

          After we analyze the part-whole structure for both concepts, we then look for relationships between ideas.

            Perspectives (Point and view)

            Finally, we can then examine the different perspectives of blockchain technology from a point (i.e. supply chain) and a view (i.e. smart contracts).

              5. VMCL (Killer tip!)

              Derek and Laura Cabrera have also developed simple rules for any organization in their most recent book Flock Not Clock: Align people, processes, and systems to achieve your vision.

              In fact, I used these simple rules to develop my vision (Emergent Learning by Swarming the Classroom) for courses I teach at Fort Hays State University (FHSU) in Hays, Kansas. Let’s take a look at these rules and examples of how you can use them.

              Vision (your desired future state or goal)

                Mission (our repeatable actions that bring about the vision… simple rules)

                  Capacity (our systems or processes that provide readiness to execute the mission)

                    Learning (our continuous improvements of systems of capacity based on feedback from the external environment)

                      Finally, here is a summary of VMCL for Emergent Learning.

                        6. Cynefin Framework

                          Developed by Dave Snowden, the Cynefin Framework is a conceptual way to assist decision makers in making decisions. For a detailed examination of the framework, I recommend reading my article How to Thrive in Chaos.

                          This framework provides simple rules (or domains) for identifying where a problem resides and the tools to use to solve a problem.

                          The Cynefin Framework is essentially 5 domains. Let’s briefly examine four of the five domains (leaving out disorder) with a description, a metaphor, and an example:

                          Simple (systems are stable and we can see clear cause-and-effect relationships)

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                          • Description: In this domain, the right answer to a problem is easy to identify.
                          • Metaphor: Playing Checkers
                          • Example: Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) in an organization can solve simple problems.

                          Complicated (a domain of experts where we know the information we need, but we don’t have the answers)

                          • Description: We have asked questions but have not received an answer.
                          • Metaphor: Playing Chess
                          • Example: The use of Lean Six Sigma (LSS) in solving problems.

                          Complex (the information we need is out there somewhere, but we don’t know what we’re looking for)

                          • Description: The best way to determine if you have a Complex or Complicated system or problem is to figure out if you have an emergent complex adaptive system (CAS) – which will have a large number of agents interacting, learning, and adapting; thus, if you have a CAS, you are in the Complex domain.
                          • Metaphor: Playing Wei-chi (aka Go)
                          • Example: Using Systems Thinking v2.0 (DSRP) to solve complex (wicked) problems.

                          Chaotic (the realm of the unknown)

                          • Description: Possessing an understanding of cause-and-effect is useless.
                          • Metaphor: Playing Twister
                          • Example: First responders and the military have to train for all possible scenarios. In this domain, it is very important to train yourself so you do not freeze during an unexpected situation (such as an active shooter).

                          Feeedback

                          7. Cue — Routine — Reward

                          Charles Duhigg writes about a powerful habit loop in The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business. By understanding the habit loop, we can change bad habits by replacing them with healthy habits. The habit loop is a neurological loop consisting of the following:

                          • Cue: The cue is anything that triggers the habit. Think of this as a tripwire.
                          • Routine: This is the routine you wish to change (i.e. smoking).
                          • Reward: The reward is the reason for change. It is the positive reinforcement for the new behavior.

                          Duhigg provides the following tips to short-circuit the habit loop.

                          Let’s look at an example:

                          Step 1: Identify the routine

                          This is the behavior you wish to change. If you step on a scale and notice a large weight gain, then this will trigger the cue to lose weight.

                          Step 2: Experiment with rewards

                          Experiment with different rewards to see which one stick. If you write down every time you run — And you create a long chain of events — Then you will want to continue the chain (imagine a calendar with a string of check-marks illustrating how often you run).

                          Step 3: Isolate the cue

                          Duhigg says that we can ask ourselves (and record our answers) five things the moment an urge hits use in order to diagnose our habit:

                          1. Where are you?

                          2. What time is it?

                          3. What’s your emotional state?

                          4. Who else is around?

                          5. What action preceded the urge?

                          Step 4: Have a plan

                          Duhigg found once we figure out our habit loop, we are then able to shift our behavior.

                          “Put another way, a habit is a formula our brain automatically follows: When I see CUE, I will do ROUTINE in order to get a REWARD.” – Charles Duhigg

                          8. Algorithms (Killer tip!)

                          Algorithms are built off of and learn from feedback loops. This is why companies, such as Netflix and Spotify can successfuly recommend movies and music to you.

                          In Swipe to Unlock: A Primer on Technology and Business Strategy, the authors illustrate the algorithm and feedback loop Spotify uses. It is a computer algorithm to find songs that fit your profile.

                            The authors discuss the Discover Weekly algorithm that starts by looking at two basic pieces of information.

                            First, it looks at all songs you’ve listened to and liked enough to add to your library or playlists. They also mention that the algorithm is even smart enough to know if you skipped a song in the first 30 seconds.

                            Second, it looks at all the playlists others have made, with the assumption that each playlist has a thematic connection.

                            We can use computer algorithms, such as the Discover Weekly algorithm as an example of how to adapt and evolve our mental models. Our mental models are our own personal feedback loops and algorithms for how we live.

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                            In Flock Not Clock, Derek and Laura Cabrera write,

                            “When we interact with the real world, we receive feedback on the accuracy of our mental models. We adjust our mental models based on that feedback. Ideally, we refine our models to be better approximations of reality.”

                            Here is how this can work:

                              Our mental model (current knowledge) takes our present understanding of reality and approximates the real world (combined with current facts). This is the lens through which we view reality. Once we make the decision to act on our current knowledge, we then receive feedback from our environment. This feedback then changes our mental model — thus, this changes/revises our present knowledge. In essence, this is an algorithm for improvement.

                              9. OODA Loop

                                The OODA Loop was created by Colonel (Ret.) John Boyd. Without going into too much detail, I have adapted the OODA Loop as follows:

                                It is a high-speed decision making and feedback process using simple rules to upgrade your critical thinking skills for a sharper mind.

                                For a more detailed look at the OODA Loop, I recommend reading my article How to Upgrade Your Critical Thinking Skills for a Sharper Mind.

                                In its simplest form, the OODA Loop is a high-speed decision making and feedback process in four stages: Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act.

                                I am using the OODA Loop in my Emergent Learning concept as discussed in the VMCL portion of this article. I use it to move from information to understanding.

                                  Observe

                                  In my course at FHSU, I have my students digest information to receive data. Essentially, information is data. Think of information as a node in a systems diagram.

                                  Orient

                                  I then help my students orient to the information in an attempt to make sense of the information. Sense-making is the process of connecting information.

                                  Decide

                                  When we connect information (connecting two nodes) we bring about knowledge. The Cabrera’s provide the perfect equation for knowledge:

                                  Knowledge = Information x Thinking

                                  Thus, we can only bring about Knowledge when we introduce students to “Thinking”.

                                  Act

                                  To truly understand a concept, we must act. When we connect knowledge we attain wisdom. This is done through practical application of concepts.

                                  Final thoughts

                                  Lastly, my hope is that these 9 game changing tips will provide you a clear picture of your future vision or goals. These missing puzzle pieces should assist you in filling in those gaps in your mind.

                                  Just remember, use questions to improve your vision, use simple rules to guide you to your vision, and always look for feedback for improvement.

                                  Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

                                  Reference

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                                  Dr. Jamie Schwandt

                                  Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt & Red Team Critical Thinker

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                                  Last Updated on November 16, 2020

                                  10 Good Habits to Have in Life to Be More Successful

                                  10 Good Habits to Have in Life to Be More Successful

                                  Habits are behaviors and patterns that you showcase by default. Many good habits to have will enable you to carry out crucial activities like taking a shower, brushing your teeth, and getting ready for work. 

                                  Interestingly, you follow this routine every day without thinking twice. Your unconscious daily habits create room for your brain to perform more advanced activities like problem-solving and choosing what book to read.

                                  Everyone has habits, and several of those habits are activated every day. I would classify them into three groups:

                                  • Habits that you hardly notice as they have become a major part of your life, such as brushing teeth or getting dressed.
                                  • Good habits to have to be more successful, like eating healthy, exercising, and reading books.
                                  • Habits that are harmful, like procrastinating, smoking, or overeating.

                                  Good habits are fundamental to becoming successful in life. Yet, as significant as habits are, some lack the knowledge of their capabilities.

                                  While much of the emphasis falls on bad habits to break, it’s just as important to focus on good habits to have and cultivate in your daily routine.

                                  Here, we’ll talk about 10 good habits to have to be more successful in life.

                                  1. Begin Your Day with Meditation

                                  I recommend mindful meditation early in the morning. This practice helps you to place yourself in the present moment. Consequently, it enables you to be mindful of challenging situations during the day.

                                  Different stressors may trigger as you go through the day; meditation helps you to remain calm before taking on the challenges.

                                  Personally, it helps me to devise strategies and think about ideas. Meditation is a good habit to have if you want to be connected to what’s significant in your life.

                                  2. Be Grateful for What You Have

                                  It’s not uncommon to waste time thinking of what’s not enough. You become immersed in those daunting challenges. However, challenges justify the presence of hope. The only strategy you have to stop focusing on your problems is to focus on what you have.

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                                  Gratitude is a time-tested pathway to success, health, and happiness. It redirects your focus to what you have from what you lack. Try writing a list of things you’re grateful for each day in a gratitude journal, or make it a habit to say one thing you’re grateful for when you sit down to dinner with your family.

                                  3. Smile

                                  Can you pause and smile before you continue reading this?

                                  Now, here is what just happened based on research conducted by the Association for Psychological Science; you set a pace for living a happier life when you smile. A genuine smile, or what’s called a Duchenne smile, is a good habit to have if you want to find spiritual, emotional, and mental peace of mind.[1]

                                  Smiling induces the release of molecules that function towards fighting stress. The physiological state of your body determines the state of your mind. When you slouch or frown, your mind takes cues relating to unhappiness and depression. However, once you adjust yourself by putting on a smile, you begin to feel a new level of excitement and vibrancy.

                                  4. Start Your Day With a Healthy Breakfast

                                  Starting your day with a healthy breakfast is a good habit to have and forms a crucial part of your life. Nevertheless, about 31 million Americans skip their breakfast each day.[2]

                                  If you are fed up hearing that breakfast is a crucial component of your day, you are only fighting the truth. If you want to become more successful, you need to “break your fast” with healthy foods every morning.

                                  This habit is not difficult to form if you usually rush out the door every single morning. You can wake up earlier to fix yourself a meal so you don’t break down during the day.

                                  Get inspired by these 20 Healthy Breakfast Choices That Will Save You Time.

                                  5. Exercise Daily

                                  One of the good habits to have is to exercise your body and muscles on a daily basis. You don’t have to run a marathon or lift tons of weights. You only need to engage in activities that oxygenate your blood and inject endorphins in your body, trying to squeeze in at least 15 minutes every day.

                                  Jack Dorsey, the CEO of Twitter, classified exercise as a good habit to maximize his already jam-packed schedule.[3] He said:

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                                  “I wake up by 5, meditate for 30 minutes, seven-minute workout times three, make coffee, and check-in.”

                                  He said on Product Hunt that he follows this routine every day as it gives him a steady-state that empowers him to be more productive.

                                  6. Manage Your Time

                                  Another good habit is the act of managing your time effectively. This goes a long way toward impacting your achievement.

                                  Time management is what separates the successful from the rest of the world as we all possess the same amount of time. How you leverage time determines your potential to succeed in life[4].

                                  Good habits to have: Time management tips

                                    So how do you manage your time effectively?

                                    Here’s Jack Dorsey’s recommendation in one of the Techonomy events:

                                    “I accomplish effective time management by theming my days and practicing self-discipline. These themes help me handle distractions and interactions. If a request or task does not align with the theme for that day, I don’t do it. This sets a cadence for everyone in the company to deliver and evaluate their progress”.

                                    And this is Dorsey’s weekly theme layout:[5]

                                    • Monday – Management
                                    • Tuesday – Product
                                    • Wednesday – Marketing and growth
                                    • Thursdays – Developers and partnerships
                                    • Fridays – Culture and recruiting
                                    • Saturdays – Taking off
                                    • Sundays – Reflection, feedback, strategy, and preparing for Monday

                                    No wonder he was able to run two companies when others were struggling with one job.

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                                    7. Set Daily Goals With Intentions

                                    Everyone has goals, whether they relate to business or personal life. The truth is, we’re all tending towards a particular direction. Nevertheless, while long-term goals can offer you direction, it’s your daily goals that help you develop short-term goals that are essential for your success.

                                    Long-term goals may not give you the motivation you need to keep on, but when you implement your short-term milestones daily, you become fired up, and you can overcome the challenges that come with taking on bigger tasks.

                                    Here’s the main truth: Successful people don’t set goals without establishing their intentions. According to Jennifer Cohen of Forbes,[6]

                                    “What helps you to achieve your desired expectation is ensuring intentions accompany your daily goals.”

                                    8. Seek Inspiration

                                    It is usually difficult to be inspired for a considerable length of time. Sometimes, you become discouraged and feel like giving up on your goals when things are not working out as intended.

                                    A practical approach to stay on top of the situation is to inspire yourself each day. When you wake up in the morning (after meditation), watch some motivational videos, and let the story of great leaders inspire you.

                                    Establish what Anthony Robbins called the “hour of power.” Determine how many minutes you spend, but make it count. Inspiration is the fuel for achievement because when you can conceive it in your mind, you can accomplish it.

                                    Michal Solowow, an investor and the founder of Mitex, puts it this way[7]:

                                    “The problems I encounter in everyday life motivate me to find solutions. This is a self-propelling mechanism. Becoming a billionaire was never a motivating factor.”

                                    9. Save Steadily, Invest With All Prudence

                                    I can’t exhaust the good habits to have without talking about saving and investing. Most times, you overlook the significance of saving for the future when you are living in your present moment. According to CNBC, a $1000 emergency will propel several Americans into debt.[8]

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                                    However, it is not enough to save, and you must invest your funds and be wise with them. If you pay attention to this now, you will set yourself up for a life of success in the future. Ensure you save at least six months in your emergency account so you can be prepared for any future emergency.

                                    If you’re looking for a simple way to save money, check out the following video:

                                    10. Budget and Track Your Spending

                                    Benjamin Franklin warned of taking the precaution of little expenses. He said:

                                    “A small leak sinks a great ship.”

                                    It is easy to discard little expenses, but the truth is they always add up. This happens when you fail to budget.

                                    Budgeting is a good habit to have, and it can impact your financial life significantly. The money you spend on extravagant lifestyles can be saved and invested in your future instead.

                                    The Bottom Line

                                    Endeavor to start developing good habits to have to become more successful as you journey through life. The quicker you cultivate them, the faster you will achieve your goals.

                                    More About Cultivating Good Habits

                                    Featured photo credit: Andrijana Bozic via unsplash.com

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