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Why Weight Lifting for Weight Loss is No Joke for Super Fast Results

Why Weight Lifting for Weight Loss is No Joke for Super Fast Results

Weight lifting is no joke! You can weight lift a few times per week and yield massive results in regards to your weight loss journey, all while getting stronger, more jacked, and feeling great!

In this article, we’ll take a deeper look into weight lifting and things that you probably never knew about it, and how you can get started with it.

What is weight lifting?

Let’s first examine what weight lifting entails.

There’s one internationally know form of weight lifting which relates to Olympic Weight Lifting — the super strong men and women you see competing in the international Olympic Games. There is actually some debate in the Powerlifting world as to whether or not the sport should be considered for the Olympic Games as it’s neighbour sport Weight Lifting already does.

The reason I bring this up is because (if you don’t already know) I’m a Powerlifter, meaning I compete (occasionally) in the sport of Powerlifting, which entails another form of lifting weight (“weight lifting”) in the Squat, Bench Press, and Deadlift movements respectively.

A Powerlifter can compete at his/her weight class and age division, and qualify (depending on the competition) to compete in large federations such as the International Powerlifting Federation (IPF), USA Powerlifting (USAPL), Canadian Powerlifting Federation (CPF) to name a few. I would argue that these large federations are akin to the Olympic Games in many ways from regulatory requirements, drug testing, and more, but let’s surmise that the following forms of lifting weight are to be considered for this article:

  1. Olympic Weight Lifting (Snatch, Power Clean, Jerk, Front Squat)[1]
  2. Powerlifting (Back Squat, Bench Press, Deadlift)[2]
  3. Powerbuilding (Over Head Press, Bent Over Row)[3]
  4. CrossFit (Snatch, Power Clean, Front Squat, Over Head Press, Jerk)[4]

You may notice bodybuilding is not mentioned here, however I did include a term known as ‘Powerbuilding’; it’s quite simple really.

Powerbuilding is basic heavy compound movements for building physical and central nervous system (CNS) strength, whereas bodybuilding focuses on smaller/individual muscular growth/hypertrophy.

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CrossFit has been included as it adopts movements from other weight lifting sports (Olympic Weight Lifting, Powerlifting).

Weight lifting for weight loss, how?

Performing the aforementioned weight lifting movements you can work large groups of muscles with minimal time!

Beyond that simple fact, you will also get an amazing cardio vascular workout while performing the higher repetition Olympic Weight Lifting and CrossFit movements, AND while performing the lower repetition Powerlifting and Powerbuilding movements.

Weight lifting comes down to simple math quite frankly. It’s based on the amount of weight you’re lifting, multiplied by the number of reps, multiplied by the number of sets. This simple formula gives you a daily volume, and when compounded over a week – a weekly volume.

Here’s an example:

Squats 5 sets of 5 (25 total reps) x 150lbs = 3,750lbs in total volume.

Your total volume is reflective of your workload for the day, or week, and to some degree dictates how much muscular growth you’ll have, and how much weight loss you’ll achieve.

In order to lose weight performing weight lifting movements, you will need to achieve a minimum daily or weekly volume total. You can set a weekly volume target of 10,000 lbs for example, and all the weight lifting you perform during the week should total 10,000 lbs lifted.

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Now when you lift 10,000 lbs for the week, you’re almost guaranteed to build muscle or lose weight, unless eating an excessive amount of food (which would be quite counter productive).

When you work your body consistently, such as reaching 10,000 lbs weekly weight lifting volume, your body’s metabolism will begin to speed-up to keep up with it’s need to utilise/burn fats as energy. Your body will also become very efficient at utilising its resources for recovery.

Since you’re now calculating daily and weekly volume, you can also consider your daily and weekly caloric intake – I suggest downloading an app such as MyFitnessPal , and entering your weight loss goals to determine your daily caloric goals.

How weightlifting works

Weight lifting in general will yield 3 benefits:

  1. Cardiovascular development, second
  2. Optimising metabolic function
  3. Improving Human Growth Hormone (HGH) development

All of these will result in weight loss from weight lifting, however I would like to specifically focus on the HGH side.

Men and women experience this development and growth of HGH. In the case of women, consider the Biologically Active Growth Hormone. Let’s examine two studies of Men and Women with regards to Weight lifting:

A study published in the Dec 2006 issue of the American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism looked at different forms of growth hormone, used different testing methods, and varied weight training regimens. The research found that the role of growth hormone in women’s muscle development may be more complicated than previously thought.

The study’s principal author, William J. Kraemer said:[5]

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We found that growth hormone was responsive to moderate and heavy exercise regimens having 3-12 repetitions with varying weight loading. Women need to have heavy loading cycle or workout in their resistance training routines, as it helps to build muscle and bone.

Next, Brazilian scientists have specifically studied if and how much eccentric weight lifting affected growth hormone (GH) levels. The researchers took measurements of lactic acid and GH in all 16 of the lifters before the workout and then continued to monitor the levels of those chemicals for 30min post-workout.

Both lactate and GH levels were higher in the men who took 3 seconds to lower the weight, but 15 minutes after the workout, the GH of the eccentric lifters was an incredible, hand-clapping, 17 times higher than that of the quick lifters. The specific summary findings were as follows:

Muscular adaptations result from a multifactorial process involving mechanical, metabolic, and immune/inflammatory factors in addition to various hormonal responses. Therefore, if the emphasis in resistance training periodization is to induce a greater acute metabolic stress and GH response, we recommend manipulating the eccentric movement velocity.

I specifically referenced a study that examined how a male weight lifts to increase GH response, because the simple fact should be widely known that weight lifting will undoubtedly yield a response in growth hormone in men.

How to start weight lifting

To start tracking weight lifting, you can download an app such as Strong Lifts to help track your weight lifting workouts.

Alternatively, you can download preset program templates such as The Texas Method by Mark Rippetoe, or 5-3-1 by Jim Wendler.

Hop on some forums such as BodyBuilding.com, or visit T-Nation.com for great weight lifting advice.

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As a fitness coach, you can also check out my profile for my health and fitness YouTube channel for specific workout videos and advice!

Stay consistent and keep yourself honest – meaning don’t miss workouts and expect amazing results.

I also suggest you integrate intermittent fasting (“IF”) into your weekly routine — fasting 16-18hrs every few days. You’ll gain so many benefits in terms of boosts to metabolism, and HGH production, that you’ll be shedding weight in no time.

Conclusion

Whether you’re considering high repetition weight lifting such as CrossFit, or leaning more towards lower repetition training styles such as Olympic Weight Lifting or Powerlifting, as long as you stay consistent and honest you’ll see results!

Stay on top of the numbers (daily, weekly volume, and calories), track your progress, and watch the extra fat fall off your body while you get super strong!

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Wikipedia: Olympic weightlifting
[2] Wikipedia: Powerlifting
[3] BodyBuilding.com: Powerbuilding
[4] Wikipedia: CrossFit
[5] Kraemer, Jeff S. Volek, Barry A. Spiering and Carl M. Maresh of the University of Connecticut, Storrs; Bradley C. Nindl, U.S Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Mass.; James O. Marx, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Lincoln A. Gotshalk, University of Hawaii at Hilo; Jill A. Bush, University of Houston, Texas; and Jill R. Welsch, Andrea M. Mastro and Wesley C. Hymer, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Penn. The The American Physiological Society published the study: Chronic Resistance Training in Women Potentiates Growth Hormone in Vivo Bioactivity: Characterization of Molecular Mass Variants

More by this author

Adam Evans

BioHacker, competitive athlete, researcher in many fields including health and fitness, science, philosophy, metaphysics, religion.

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Last Updated on September 16, 2019

How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

How to Stop Procrastinating: 11 Practical Ways for Procrastinators

You have a deadline looming. However, instead of doing your work, you are fiddling with miscellaneous things like checking email, social media, watching videos, surfing blogs and forums. You know you should be working, but you just don’t feel like doing anything.

We are all familiar with the procrastination phenomenon. When we procrastinate, we squander away our free time and put off important tasks we should be doing them till it’s too late. And when it is indeed too late, we panic and wish we got started earlier.

The chronic procrastinators I know have spent years of their life looped in this cycle. Delaying, putting off things, slacking, hiding from work, facing work only when it’s unavoidable, then repeating this loop all over again. It’s a bad habit that eats us away and prevents us from achieving greater results in life.

Don’t let procrastination take over your life. Here, I will share my personal steps on how to stop procrastinating. These 11 steps will definitely apply to you too:

1. Break Your Work into Little Steps

Part of the reason why we procrastinate is because subconsciously, we find the work too overwhelming for us. Break it down into little parts, then focus on one part at the time. If you still procrastinate on the task after breaking it down, then break it down even further. Soon, your task will be so simple that you will be thinking “gee, this is so simple that I might as well just do it now!”.

For example, I’m currently writing a new book (on How to achieve anything in life). Book writing at its full scale is an enormous project and can be overwhelming. However, when I break it down into phases such as –

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  • (1) Research
  • (2) Deciding the topic
  • (3) Creating the outline
  • (4) Drafting the content
  • (5) Writing Chapters #1 to #10,
  • (6) Revision
  • (7) etc.

Suddenly it seems very manageable. What I do then is to focus on the immediate phase and get it done to my best ability, without thinking about the other phases. When it’s done, I move on to the next.

2. Change Your Environment

Different environments have different impact on our productivity. Look at your work desk and your room. Do they make you want to work or do they make you want to snuggle and sleep? If it’s the latter, you should look into changing your workspace.

One thing to note is that an environment that makes us feel inspired before may lose its effect after a period of time. If that’s the case, then it’s time to change things around. Refer to Steps #2 and #3 of 13 Strategies To Jumpstart Your Productivity, which talks about revamping your environment and workspace.

3. Create a Detailed Timeline with Specific Deadlines

Having just 1 deadline for your work is like an invitation to procrastinate. That’s because we get the impression that we have time and keep pushing everything back, until it’s too late.

Break down your project (see tip #1), then create an overall timeline with specific deadlines for each small task. This way, you know you have to finish each task by a certain date. Your timelines must be robust, too – i.e. if you don’t finish this by today, it’s going to jeopardize everything else you have planned after that. This way it creates the urgency to act.

My goals are broken down into monthly, weekly, right down to the daily task lists, and the list is a call to action that I must accomplish this by the specified date, else my goals will be put off.

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Here’re more tips on setting deadlines: 22 Tips for Effective Deadlines

4. Eliminate Your Procrastination Pit-Stops

If you are procrastinating a little too much, maybe that’s because you make it easy to procrastinate.

Identify your browser bookmarks that take up a lot of your time and shift them into a separate folder that is less accessible. Disable the automatic notification option in your email client. Get rid of the distractions around you.

I know some people will out of the way and delete or deactivate their facebook accounts. I think it’s a little drastic and extreme as addressing procrastination is more about being conscious of our actions than counteracting via self-binding methods, but if you feel that’s what’s needed, go for it.

5. Hang out with People Who Inspire You to Take Action

I’m pretty sure if you spend just 10 minutes talking to Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, you’ll be more inspired to act than if you spent the 10 minutes doing nothing. The people we are with influence our behaviors. Of course spending time with Steve Jobs or Bill Gates every day is probably not a feasible method, but the principle applies — The Hidden Power of Every Single Person Around You

Identify the people, friends or colleagues who trigger you – most likely the go-getters and hard workers – and hang out with them more often. Soon you will inculcate their drive and spirit too.

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As a personal development blogger, I “hang out” with inspiring personal development experts by reading their blogs and corresponding with them regularly via email and social media. It’s communication via new media and it works all the same.

6. Get a Buddy

Having a companion makes the whole process much more fun. Ideally, your buddy should be someone who has his/her own set of goals. Both of you will hold each other accountable to your goals and plans. While it’s not necessary for both of you to have the same goals, it’ll be even better if that’s the case, so you can learn from each other.

I have a good friend whom I talk to regularly, and we always ask each other about our goals and progress in achieving those goals. Needless to say, it spurs us to keep taking action.

7. Tell Others About Your Goals

This serves the same function as #6, on a larger scale. Tell all your friends, colleagues, acquaintances and family about your projects. Now whenever you see them, they are bound to ask you about your status on those projects.

For example, sometimes I announce my projects on The Personal Excellence Blog, Twitter and Facebook, and my readers will ask me about them on an ongoing basis. It’s a great way to keep myself accountable to my plans.

8. Seek out Someone Who Has Already Achieved the Outcome

What is it you want to accomplish here, and who are the people who have accomplished this already? Go seek them out and connect with them. Seeing living proof that your goals are very well achievable if you take action is one of the best triggers for action.

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9. Re-Clarify Your Goals

If you have been procrastinating for an extended period of time, it might reflect a misalignment between what you want and what you are currently doing. Often times, we outgrow our goals as we discover more about ourselves, but we don’t change our goals to reflect that.

Get away from your work (a short vacation will be good, else just a weekend break or staycation will do too) and take some time to regroup yourself. What exactly do you want to achieve? What should you do to get there? What are the steps to take? Does your current work align with that? If not, what can you do about it?

10. Stop Over-Complicating Things

Are you waiting for a perfect time to do this? That maybe now is not the best time because of X, Y, Z reasons? Ditch that thought because there’s never a perfect time. If you keep waiting for one, you are never going to accomplish anything.

Perfectionism is one of the biggest reasons for procrastination. Read more about why perfectionist tendencies can be a bane than a boon: Why Being A Perfectionist May Not Be So Perfect.

11. Get a Grip and Just Do It

At the end, it boils down to taking action. You can do all the strategizing, planning and hypothesizing, but if you don’t take action, nothing’s going to happen. Occasionally, I get readers and clients who keep complaining about their situations but they still refuse to take action at the end of the day.

Reality check:

I have never heard anyone procrastinate their way to success before and I doubt it’s going to change in the near future.  Whatever it is you are procrastinating on, if you want to get it done, you need to get a grip on yourself and do it.

More About Procrastination

Featured photo credit: Malvestida Magazine via unsplash.com

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