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6 Simple Tips for Removing Stains from Your Dry Erase Board

6 Simple Tips for Removing Stains from Your Dry Erase Board

Cleaning your dry erase board is a rather simple task that only requires an eraser and a good scrub-down after a long day of use. However, if you lack either of these two components, chances are your board will develop those faint marker stains over time, which will make it difficult to read or write legibly.

There are tons of brands that offer different products for cleaning dry erase boards. Most of these will get you good results, though you will have to dig deep into your pockets for many of them.

If you are looking to save some cash and a trip to the stationary store, try one of these methods based on what you have around the house or at the office.

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1. Dry Cleaner Fluid

The same chemical you use to remove stains from your favorite suit or carpet can be used to make your board squeaky clean. To clean your board, spray its surface with carpet stain remover, hairspray, or spray cleaner and then wipe the surface with a piece of cloth or sponge. Then apply a small amount of baby oil or another type of mineral oil to protect the surface.

Before using any type of dry cleaner fluid, ensure the type of dry erase board (e.g. porcelain and melamine) won’t be affected by abrasive compounds in the fluid. If, for instance, you used something like the Remarkable dry erase paint to create an artificial dry erase board, be mindful of the surface on which you used the paint.

2. Rubbing/Isopropyl Alcohol

Rubbing alcohol is also another effective cleaning compound for your dry erase board. The most effective concentration is usually 99%, though 90% isopropyl will also work. 70% will also work, though not as effectively as the higher concentrations.

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Wipe the dry erase board carefully using the dry erase board eraser and a piece of cloth to remove dust. Soak a small piece of cloth with the alcohol and wipe the board thoroughly. Rinse it with warm water and repeat until the marks have cleared.

3. Hand Sanitizer

Apart from sanitizing your hands, hand sanitizers are also perfect for removing marker stains from dry erase boards. Before you begin, ensure the surface is dusted off with a dry piece of cloth. Once the surface is dust-free, apply the hand sanitizer over the surface of the board and let it sit for up to a minute. Then, use a paper towel or soft cloth to wipe the surface of the board for a stainless surface.

4. Vinegar

Vinegar is used for a ton of things at home – from cleaning and cooking to disinfecting wounds as a first aid supplement. To clean your board with white vinegar, mix a teaspoon of vinegar with a cup of water and stir to make a solution. Pour the solution into a spray bottle and spray the surface of the board, using a cloth to wipe it down.

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Alternatively, you can pour the solution into a bowl and use a cloth to wipe the board. Once every inch of the surface has been wiped, dry the surface with a lint-free piece of cloth.

5. Toothpaste

If your dry erase board is made from any type of non-porous material, then toothpaste will work perfectly for many types of stains, including stains from permanent markers. Find an old “decommissioned” toothbrush that won’t be used for brushing teeth and apply regular toothpaste. Apply a little water and begin scrubbing the surface of the board.

Once the surface has been thoroughly scrubbed, use a paper towel to wipe down the surface for a clean, fresh, and stainless look.

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6. Baking Soda

Baking soda is also another effective cleaning agent for removing stains from your dry erase board. For this method, add some baking soda into a container of water and mix thoroughly until it forms a thick paste. Using a piece of cloth or paper towel, apply a small amount of the paste over the surface of the dry erase board and scrub.

You can choose to let it air dry or wipe it down with a paper towel for a crispy clean look.

Conclusion

To prevent damaging your dry erase board, always ensure that the material making up the board is not porous as some of the chemicals can damage the surface. Plus, if your board also doubles up as a digital whiteboard, make sure you go through the cleaning instructions to prevent unnecessary damage.

Featured photo credit: Pixabay.com via pixabay.com

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Vikas Agrawal

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Last Updated on February 15, 2019

Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

Why Is Goal Setting Important to a Truly Fulfilling Life?

In Personal Development-speak, we are always talking about goals, outcomes, success, desires and dreams. In other words, all the stuff we want to do, achieve and create in our world.

And while it’s important for us to know what we want to achieve (our goal), it’s also important for us to understand why we want to achieve it; the reason behind the goal or some would say, our real goal.

Why is goal setting important?

1. Your needs and desire will be fulfilled.

Sometimes when we explore our “why”, (why we want to achieve a certain thing) we realize that our “what” (our goal) might not actually deliver us the thing (feeling, emotion, internal state) we’re really seeking.

For example, the person who has a goal to lose weight in the belief that weight loss will bring them happiness, security, fulfillment, attention, popularity and the partner of their dreams. In this instance, their “what” is weight-loss and their “why” is happiness (etc.) and a partner.

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Six months later, they have lost the weight (achieved their goal) but as is often the case, they’re not happier, not more secure, not more confident, not more fulfilled and in keeping with their miserable state, they have failed to attract their dream partner.

After all, who wants to be with someone who’s miserable? They achieved their practical goal but still failed to have their needs met.

So they set a goal to lose another ten pounds. And then another. And maybe just ten more. With the destructive and erroneous belief that if they can get thin enough, they’ll find their own personal nirvana. And we all know how that story ends.

2. You’ll find out what truly motivates you

The important thing in the process of constructing our best life is not necessarily what goals we set (what we think we want) but what motivates us towards those goals (what we really want).

The sooner we begin to explore, identify and understand what motivates us towards certain achievements, acquisitions or outcomes (that is, we begin moving towards greater consciousness and self awareness), the sooner we will make better decisions for our life, set more intelligent (and dare I say, enlightened) goals and experience more fulfilment and less frustration.

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We all know people who have achieved what they set out to, only to end up in the same place or worse (emotionally, psychologically, sociologically) because what they were chasing wasn’t really what they were needing.

What we think we want will rarely provide us with what we actually need.

3. Your state of mind will be a lot healthier

We all set specific goals to achieve/acquire certain things (a job, a car, a partner, a better body, a bank balance, a title, a victory) because at some level, most of us believe (consciously or not) that the achievement of those goals will bring us what we really seek; joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

Of course, setting practical, material and financial goals is an intelligent thing to do considering the world we live in and how that world works.

But setting goals with an expectation that the achievement of certain things in our external, physical world will automatically create an internal state of peace, contentment, joy and total happiness is an unhealthy and unrealistic mindset to inhabit.

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What you truly want and need

Sometimes we need to look beyond the obvious (superficial) goals to discover and secure what we really want.

Sadly, we live in a collective mindset which teaches that the prettiest and the wealthiest are the most successful.

Some self-help frauds even teach this message. If you’re rich or pretty, you’re happy. If you’re both, you’re very happy. Pretty isn’t what we really want; it’s what we believe pretty will bring us. Same goes with money.

When we cut through the hype, the jargon and the self-help mumbo jumbo, we all have the same basic goals, desires and needs:

Joy, fulfilment, happiness, safety, peace, recognition, love, acceptance, respect, connection.

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Nobody needs a mansion or a sport’s car but we all need love.

Nobody needs massive pecs, six percent body-fat, a face lift or bigger breasts but we all need connection, acceptance and understanding.

Nobody needs to be famous but we all need peace, calm, balance and happiness.

The problem is, we live in a culture which teaches that one equals the other. If only we lived in a culture which taught that real success is far more about what’s happening in our internal environment, than our external one.

It’s a commonly-held belief that we’re all very different and we all have different goals — whether short term or long term goals. But in many ways we’re not, and we don’t; we all want essentially the same things.

Now all you have to do is see past the fraud and deception and find the right path.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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