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Surprising High-Sodium Foods You Need To Avoid For Kidney Health

Surprising High-Sodium Foods You Need To Avoid For Kidney Health

Our kidneys are delicate yet vital organs. By removing unwanted fluid in our bloodstreams, they perform some very important functions in our bodies. Not only do they keep our bloodstream healthy, they also regulate blood pressure by keeping an appropriate salt and water balance. A high-salt diet can alter this precise regulatory function within our bodies leading to higher blood pressure, and the many diseases linked to this, as well kidney failure and other kidney related diseases.

Several research papers have cited salt as a silent killer precisely because many supermarket foods contain surprisingly high amounts of sodium. In the UK, 3 per cent of the National Health Service’s entire budget is spent solely on treating kidney disease. So what foods do we have to be careful with if we want to reduce our daily sodium intake? Here are a few to watch out for.

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1. Cereal

Cereals are healthy, right? That’s how many big cereal brands promote themselves in our supermarkets today, but even some of the so-called “healthy” options contain alarming amounts of salt. Many cereals have up to 12 per cent of the daily recommended intake in only one serving. That’s 180 to 300mg of sodium per serving. A better option is plain oatmeal topped with a serving of fresh fruit, which will help you towards a much healthier daily intake.

2. Bread

Another staple breakfast food that is often promoted as part of a healthy balanced diet, but some supermarket brands of bread can contain very high amounts of sodium. A study carried out in 2011 showed that brown bread, the supposedly healthier variety, which is a good source of fibre, made up four of the five saltiest loaves in a sample of 300 popular brands in the UK. The figures, put together by the Consensus Action on Salt & Health (CASH) campaign group, suggest that a child aged four to six could exceed their recommended daily intake just by eating a sandwich made using one of the popular brands.

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    3. Cottage Cheese

    Cottage cheese can be a nutrient-filled addition to any breakfast or snack. It packs in a good amount of calcium, is relatively low in fat and is a surprisingly good source of protein. However, some varieties can also have surprising amounts of sodium in them. One serving can contain almost 1000mg of sodium which is about 40 per cent of your recommended daily intake. Greek yoghurt, which contains a small fraction of the sodium, is a great protein-rich substitute.

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    homemade-cottage-cheese-recipe

      4. Hot Chocolate

      Much like cereal, we wouldn’t bat an eyelid seeing it on a high-sugar foods list, but it’s surprising to see how much salt some of the well-known supermarket brands of hot chocolate contain. One serving can contain 7 per cent of your recommended intake. That’s a lot of salt for a drink! Bearing in mind a regular serving can contain about 20g of sugar too, it may be delicious but it ain’t healthy.

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      5. Seafood

      Seafood can be a fantastic source of omega-3 fatty acids and can be a great aid to healthy heart function. Fresh salmon, for example, can help to lower cholesterol and lower blood pressure. It’s always very important to know how your seafood is prepared though. Canned tuna can contain up to 300mg of sodium in a small serving, whilst four large shrimp can contain 200mg. Always read the tin carefully, which leads us to our final point..

      6. “Reduced-Sodium” Foods

      It’s so easy to be led astray these days by supermarket labelling into thinking we’re going for a much healthier option when really we are not. When it comes to sodium content in foods, it’s important to distinguish between two types of labels. These are “reduced sodium” and “low sodium”. According to FDA regulations, “low sodium” label foods must contain 140mg of sodium or less, whilst “reduced sodium foods” contain 25 per cent less than the original product. A canned soup that could contain up to 1000mg of sodium therefore, would still contain a very high 750mg, about 30 per cent of your daily value.

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      Christopher Young

      Freelance Blogger, Writer and Journalist

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      Last Updated on June 13, 2019

      5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

      5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

      Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

      You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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      1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

      It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

      Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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      2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

      If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

      3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

      If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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      4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

      A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

      5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

      If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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      Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

      Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

      Reference

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