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Eating Egg Yolk Is Bad For Your Heart? Science Says The Opposite

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Eating Egg Yolk Is Bad For Your Heart? Science Says The Opposite

Nutrition research suggests that eggs not only are a convenient source of nutrients but they can also play a pivotal role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, eye health, and more. In fact, according to a study done by the Egg Nutrition Center,[1] simply consuming one egg a day reduces the risk of stroke by as much 12 percent.

Egg Myth-Busting

Decades-old research has sustained and perpetuated the idea that eggs are bad and should be consumed sparingly if at all. This was largely because one large egg contains between 186 and 213 milligrams of cholesterol.[2] And all of the cholesterol is in the yolk.

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Scientists and health professionals have drilled into our brains that high blood cholesterol is the primary cause of heart disease. Cholesterol- in and of itself–is not bad.[3] It helps your body build new cells, insulate nerves, produce hormones, and make testosterone, which all in-turn help to increase energy and build muscle. Under normal circumstances, the liver produces all the cholesterol the body needs. However, cholesterol also enters your body from animal-based foods like milk, eggs, and meat. Too much cholesterol in your body can increase your risk for developing heart disease.[4] Since eggs are fairly high in cholesterol, it was assumed that eating them regularly–particularly the yolks–was a precursor to heart disease.

Today, researchers understand that cholesterol in food is not the true and sole culprit for heart disease. Studies have revealed that saturated and trans fats actually have a much greater effect on blood cholesterol. According to research conducted by Dr. Luc Djoussé, a heart disease researcher at Harvard Medical School, dietary cholesterol does not translate into high levels of blood cholesterol.[5]

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“Current scientific data do not justify worries about egg consumption, including egg yolk, when it comes to heart health,” he says.

Eggs–specifically the yolks–are good for your health

Egg yolks contain almost all the vitamins and minerals in the egg. There’s just no comparison. Most of the vitamins and minerals in an egg are lost if the yolk is discarded. The white of a large egg contains around 60 percent of the egg’s total protein. Additionally, fat and cholesterol in the egg yolk[6] contain fat-soluble nutrients like vitamins D, E, A, choline, and carotenoids,[7] which may aid the body in absorbing these essential and important nutritional components of eggs.

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Eggs also contain phospholipids which may affect cholesterol and inflammation levels in beneficial ways, help decrease blood pressure, and improve vascular function.[8] Preliminary research results have revealed that phospholipids may also help to protect against Alzheimer’s Disease,[9] although the results from these studies are still far from definitive.

In 2000, the American Heart Association (AHA) revised its dietary guidelines and gave healthy adults the green light to enjoy eggs once again. The AHA’s guidelines now allow healthy adults to consume an egg a day but still advise on keeping the total daily cholesterol limit to less than 300 mg.

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Best cooking methods to unlock eggs’ nutritional benefits

Applying heat to good food is a naturally destructive process. The chemistry of heating foods looks a lot like unwinding molecules. In vegetables, heat can break down cell walls to sometimes help make nutrients more accessible to your gut. In egg whites, the proteins become unwound, to become slightly more bio-available (which refers to the proportion of a nutrient that is absorbed from the diet and used for normal body functions). Or to put it simply, heating egg whites is generally beneficial. The yolks, however, should be prepared with as little heat as possible, because heat damages fats and the vital nutrients inside. 

Raw eggs are the most nutrient-rich way to consume eggs, however experts warn against this practice as raw eggs can contain Salmonella[10] and other harmful contaminates.

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Reference

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Last Updated on December 2, 2021

The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

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The Importance of Making a Camping Checklist

Camping can be hard work, but it’s the preparation that’s even harder. There are usually a lot of things to do in order to make sure that you and your family or friends have the perfect camping experience. But sometimes you might get to your destination and discover that you have left out one or more crucial things.

There is no dispute that preparation and organization for a camping trip can be quite overwhelming, but if it is done right, you would see at the end of the day, that it was worth the stress. This is why it is important to ensure optimum planning and execution. For this to be possible, it is advised that in addition to a to-do-list, you should have a camping checklist to remind you of every important detail.

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Why You Should Have a Camping Checklist

Creating a camping checklist makes for a happy and always ready camper. It also prevents mishaps.  A proper camping checklist should include every essential thing you would need for your camping activities, organized into various categories such as shelter, clothing, kitchen, food, personal items, first aid kit, informational items, etc. These categories should be organized by importance. However, it is important that you should not list more than you can handle or more than is necessary for your outdoor adventure.

Camping checklists vary depending on the kind of camping and outdoor activities involved. You should not go on the internet and compile a list of just any camping checklist. Of course, you can research camping checklists, but you have to put into consideration the kind of camping you are doing. It could be backpacking, camping with kids, canoe camping, social camping, etc. You have to be specific and take note of those things that are specifically important to your trip, and those things which are generally needed in all camping trips no matter the kind of camping being embarked on.

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Here are some tips to help you prepare for your next camping trip.

  1. First off, you must have found the perfect campground that best suits your outdoor adventure. If you haven’t, then you should. Sites like Reserve America can help you find and reserve a campsite.
  2. Find or create a good camping checklist that would best suit your kind of camping adventure.
  3. Make sure the whole family is involved in making out the camping check list or downloading a proper checklist that reflects the families need and ticking off the boxes of already accomplished tasks.
  4. You should make out or download a proper checklist months ahead of your trip to make room for adjustments and to avoid too much excitement and the addition of unnecessary things.
  5. Checkout Camping Hacks that would make for a more fun camping experience and prepare you for different situations.

Now on to the checklist!

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Here is how your checklist should look

1. CAMPSITE GEAR

  • Tent, poles, stakes
  • Tent footprint (ground cover for under your tent)
  • Extra tarp or canopy
  • Sleeping bag for each camper
  • Sleeping pad for each camper
  • Repair kit for pads, mattress, tent, tarp
  • Pillows
  • Extra blankets
  • Chairs
  • Headlamps or flashlights ( with extra batteries)
  • Lantern
  • Lantern fuel or batteries

2.  KITCHEN

  • Stove
  • Fuel for stove
  • Matches or lighter
  • Pot
  • French press or portable coffee maker
  • Corkscrew
  • Roasting sticks for marshmallows, hot dogs
  • Food-storage containers
  • Trash bags
  • Cooler
  • Ice
  • Water bottles
  • Plates, bowls, forks, spoons, knives
  • Cups, mugs
  • Paring knife, spatula, cooking spoon
  • Cutting board
  • Foil
  • soap
  • Sponge, dishcloth, dishtowel
  • Paper towels
  • Extra bin for washing dishes

3. CLOTHES

  • Clothes for daytime
  • Sleepwear
  • Swimsuits
  • Rainwear
  • Shoes: hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes
  • Extra layers for warmth
  • Gloves
  • Hats

4. PERSONAL ITEMS

  • Sunscreen
  • Insect repellent
  • First-aid kit
  • Prescription medications
  • Toothbrush, toiletries
  • Soap

5. OTHER ITEMS

  • Camera
  • Campsite reservation confirmation, phone number
  • Maps, area information

This list is not completely exhaustive. To make things easier, you can check specialized camping sites like RealSimpleRainyAdventures, and LoveTheOutdoors that have downloadable camping checklists that you can download on your phone or gadget and check as you go.

Featured photo credit: Scott Goodwill via unsplash.com

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