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Eating Egg Yolk Is Bad For Your Heart? Science Says The Opposite

Eating Egg Yolk Is Bad For Your Heart? Science Says The Opposite

Nutrition research suggests that eggs not only are a convenient source of nutrients but they can also play a pivotal role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, eye health, and more. In fact, according to a study done by the Egg Nutrition Center,[1] simply consuming one egg a day reduces the risk of stroke by as much 12 percent.

Egg Myth-Busting

Decades-old research has sustained and perpetuated the idea that eggs are bad and should be consumed sparingly if at all. This was largely because one large egg contains between 186 and 213 milligrams of cholesterol.[2] And all of the cholesterol is in the yolk.

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Scientists and health professionals have drilled into our brains that high blood cholesterol is the primary cause of heart disease. Cholesterol- in and of itself–is not bad.[3] It helps your body build new cells, insulate nerves, produce hormones, and make testosterone, which all in-turn help to increase energy and build muscle. Under normal circumstances, the liver produces all the cholesterol the body needs. However, cholesterol also enters your body from animal-based foods like milk, eggs, and meat. Too much cholesterol in your body can increase your risk for developing heart disease.[4] Since eggs are fairly high in cholesterol, it was assumed that eating them regularly–particularly the yolks–was a precursor to heart disease.

Today, researchers understand that cholesterol in food is not the true and sole culprit for heart disease. Studies have revealed that saturated and trans fats actually have a much greater effect on blood cholesterol. According to research conducted by Dr. Luc Djoussé, a heart disease researcher at Harvard Medical School, dietary cholesterol does not translate into high levels of blood cholesterol.[5]

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“Current scientific data do not justify worries about egg consumption, including egg yolk, when it comes to heart health,” he says.

Eggs–specifically the yolks–are good for your health

Egg yolks contain almost all the vitamins and minerals in the egg. There’s just no comparison. Most of the vitamins and minerals in an egg are lost if the yolk is discarded. The white of a large egg contains around 60 percent of the egg’s total protein. Additionally, fat and cholesterol in the egg yolk[6] contain fat-soluble nutrients like vitamins D, E, A, choline, and carotenoids,[7] which may aid the body in absorbing these essential and important nutritional components of eggs.

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Eggs also contain phospholipids which may affect cholesterol and inflammation levels in beneficial ways, help decrease blood pressure, and improve vascular function.[8] Preliminary research results have revealed that phospholipids may also help to protect against Alzheimer’s Disease,[9] although the results from these studies are still far from definitive.

In 2000, the American Heart Association (AHA) revised its dietary guidelines and gave healthy adults the green light to enjoy eggs once again. The AHA’s guidelines now allow healthy adults to consume an egg a day but still advise on keeping the total daily cholesterol limit to less than 300 mg.

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Best cooking methods to unlock eggs’ nutritional benefits

Applying heat to good food is a naturally destructive process. The chemistry of heating foods looks a lot like unwinding molecules. In vegetables, heat can break down cell walls to sometimes help make nutrients more accessible to your gut. In egg whites, the proteins become unwound, to become slightly more bio-available (which refers to the proportion of a nutrient that is absorbed from the diet and used for normal body functions). Or to put it simply, heating egg whites is generally beneficial. The yolks, however, should be prepared with as little heat as possible, because heat damages fats and the vital nutrients inside. 

Raw eggs are the most nutrient-rich way to consume eggs, however experts warn against this practice as raw eggs can contain Salmonella[10] and other harmful contaminates.

Reference

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Denise Hill

Denise shares about psychology and communication tips on Lifehack.

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Last Updated on December 9, 2019

5 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Effectively

5 Simple Ways to Relieve Stress Effectively

Everyone experiences mental stress at one time or another. Maybe you’re starting a new career, job, or business, or you feel incredibly overwhelmed between work, parenting, and your love life (or a lack of it). It could even be that you simply feel that you have way too much to do and not enough time to do it,  plus, on top of everything, nothing seems to be going the way it should!

Yup, we all experience mental stress from time-to-time, and that’s okay as long as you have the tools, techniques and knowledge that allow you to fully relieve it once it comes.

Here are 5 tips for relieving mental stress when it comes so you can function at your best while feeling good (and doing well) in work, love, or life:

1. Get Rationally Optimistic

Mental stress starts with your perception of your experiences. For instance, most people get stressed out when they perceive their reality as “being wrong” in some way. Essentially, they have a set idea of how things “should be” at any given moment, and when reality ends up being different (not even necessarily bad), they get stressed.

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This process is simply a result of perception and can be easily “fixed” by recognizing that although life might not always be going as YOU think it should, it’s still going as it should—for your own benefit.

In fact, once you fully recognize that everything in your life ultimately happens for your own growth, progress, and development—so you can achieve your goals and dreams—your perception works in your favor. You soon process and respond to your experience of life differently, for your advantage. That’s the essence of becoming “rationally optimistic.”

The result: no more mental stress.

2. Unplug

Just like you might need to unplug your computer when it starts acting all crazy, you should also “unplug” your mind.

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How on earth do you unplug your mind? Simple: just meditate.

It isn’t nearly difficult or complicated as some people think, so, if you don’t already meditate, give it a try. Whether you meditate for 5 minutes, 30 minutes, or 2 hours, this is a surefire way to reduce mental stress.

Meditation has been scientifically proven to relax your body (resulting in less mental stress), while also reducing anxiety and high blood pressure.

3. Easy on the Caffeine

Yes, we know, we know—everyone loves a nice java buzz, and that’s okay, but there’s a fine line between a small caffeine pick-me-up and a racing heart and mind that throws you into a frenzy of mental stress.

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Try giving up caffeine for a while and see how you feel. And, if that’s completely out of the question for you, at least try to minimize it. You might find that lots of your mental stress mysteriously “disappears” as your caffeine intake goes down.

4. Attack Mental Stress Via the Back Door

That’s right: your body and mind are part of the whole being, and are constantly influencing and affecting each other. If you’re experiencing a lot of mental stress, try to reduce it by calming your body down—a calm body equals a calmer mind.

How do you calm your body down and reduce physical stress? A  great way to reduce physical stress (thereby reducing mental stress) is to take natural supplements that are proven to reduce stress and anxiety while lifting your mood. Three good ones to look into are kava-kava, St John’s wort, and rhodiola rosea:

  • Kava-kava is a natural plant known to have mild sedative properties, and you should be able to find it at your natural health food store or vitamin store. It’s available in capsules or liquid extract form.
  • St John’s wort is a natural flower used to treat depression. Again, it’s found at your local health store in capsules or liquid. Because it uplifts mood (enabling you to see the brighter side of all experiences) it helps relieve mental stress as well.
  • Rhodiola rosea is a natural plant shown to reduce stress and uplift mood, and Russian athletes have been using it forever. Like the other two supplements mentioned, rhodiola rosea can be found at your natural health store in capsule or liquid form.

While these supplements are all natural and can be very helpful for most people, always check with your health care provider first as they can cause side-effects depending on your current health situation etc.

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5. Good Old-Fashioned Exercise

This tip has been around forever because it works. Nothing relieves mental stress like running, kickboxing—you name it. Anything super-physical will wipe out most of your mental stresses once the exercise endorphins (happy chemicals) are released into your brain.

The result: mental stress will be gone!

So, if you’re feeling overwhelmed or just plain stressed, try using some of the above tips. You can even print this out or save it to refer to regularly.

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Featured photo credit: Radu Florin via unsplash.com

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