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Aloe’s Natural Treatment Benefits

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Aloe’s Natural Treatment Benefits

It’s outrageous that an ancient and proven natural therapy as powerful as the aloe plant is still ignored by most American doctors. Aloe is a powerful natural treatment that’s used all over the world — but not in America, where it’s applied only to soothe sunburns.

Mainstream medicine, Big Pharma, and the FDA have yet to accept aloe’s extraordinary medicinal qualities, though aloe has been a medicinal powerhouse for more than 5,000 years. It’s widely used today in Europe, South America, Africa, and Asia.

The Benefits of Aloe

In Ayurvedic medicine, the oldest health care system in the world, aloe is called “Kumari,” or “miracle herb.”

Aloe is used extensively by healers in Africa. In Bali, it’s called “lidah buaya,” or “crocodile tongue,” and is considered to be a potent immune-system booster.

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Aloe africana

    In Europe, the EMA — the European equivalent of the FDA — approved it years ago as an immune-system booster for AIDS patients. It’s widely recommended there as a natural therapy.1

    An aloe-based protocol is also widely used in Brazil and in many parts of Asia.

    Aloe Studies

    Dozens of studies confirm aloe’s benefits.Compelling research from Japan shows that even in small concentrations, aloe can trigger apoptosis (cell death) in liver, brain, and glandular cancer cells. The study found that the higher the dosage, the more effective it is.3

    Another study from China revealed that one extract in particular, Aloe-emodin, is antiviral and can kill lung, liver, and breast tumors.5,6

    What Does the Aloe Plant Contain?

    Aloe contains three powerful immune-system boosters — polypeptides, polysaccharides, and acemannan.

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    Aloe also contains a special kind of polysaccharide called acetylated mannose. Studies show that acetylated mannose doubles your number of T-cells within three weeks and significantly boosts the power of your natural killer cells (NK), which seek out pathogens and destroy them.

    Aloe has also been shown to minimize the damage to your body from chemo and radiation therapy. While chemo and radiation can be highly effective at killing cancer cells, they also wreak havoc on your immune system.7

    To be clear, I’m not talking about the typical green, gel-like aloe you use as after-sun. I’m talking about fresh aloe water or aloe juice straight from the leaves of the plant.

    aloe-juice

      You can find aloe water or juice online and at most health food stores. The best products contain at least 98% aloe and are cold processed using the whole leaf without aloin — the irritating chemical in aloe that can cause diarrhea. You should also avoid varieties that contain sugar and fruit juice, which diminish the nutritional value.

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      I often recommend my patients add it to my healthy “Green Drink” smoothie recipe:

      green-drink

        Ingredients:

        • ¼-cup radicchio
        • 1 purple carrot
        • 1 cucumber
        • 1 lime
        • ¼-cup parsley
        • ½-cup Swiss chard
        • 1-cup spinach
        • ½-cup filtered water
        • ½-cup ice
        • 1 scoop (1.5 grams) of aloe powder

        Instructions:

        Blend all the ingredients together until smooth. You don’t have to follow this recipe to the letter — you can make it to your taste. Just be sure to add the aloe.

        Aloe can also be taken as a supplement. Gel capsules are available online and at most health food stores. For the best immune-boosting results, take 300 mg twice daily. Remember to consult with your doctor before starting or stopping any treatments.

        To your good health!

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        References:

        1. Ahirwar K, Jain S. “Aloe-emodin novel anticancer Herbal Drug.” International Journal of Phytomedicine. 2011;3, 27-31
        2. Karaca, K., et al., Int.J.Immunopharmacol., vol 17, p. 183, 1995.
        3. Sukai, R., “Epidemiologic survey on lung cancer with respect to cigarette smoking and plant diet. Japanese Journal of Cancer Research.” 1989. 513-520.
        4. Chen R, Wang S, Zhang J, Chen M, Wang Y. “Aloe-emodin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: formulation design and in vitro anti-cancer study.” Drug Deliv. 2014.
        5. Du Plessis, L., Hamman, J. “In vitro evaluation of the cytotoxic and apoptogenic properties of Aloe whole leaf and gel materials.” Drug Chem Toxicol. 2014.
        6. Sani, M., Goyal, P., Chaudhary, G. “Anti-tumor activity of Aloe vera against DMBA/croton induced skin papillomagenisis in Swiss albino mice.” 2010. Journal of Environmental pathology, Toxicology and Oncology.
        7. Bałan, B., Niemcewiz, M., Kocik, J. et al. “Oral Administration of Aloe Vera Gel, Anti-Microbial and Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Remedy, Stimulates Cell-Mediated Immunity and Antibody Production in a Mouse Model.” Central-EuropeanJournal of Immunology. 2014. 125–130.

        Featured photo credit: Flickr via flickr.com

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        Last Updated on January 27, 2022

        5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

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        5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

        Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

        “Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

        Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

        Food is a universal necessity.

        It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

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        Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

        Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

        Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

        Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

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        The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

        Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

        This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

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        Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

        Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

        Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

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        So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

        Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

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