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8 Fermented Foods That Are Good For Digestion

8 Fermented Foods That Are Good For Digestion

Here’s something that might shock you: the stomach is like a second brain. In fact, its function is so important to the human body that it affects just about everything when it is out of shape. The gut is made up of trillions of good and bad bacteria, and when it gets out of balance, problems begin to occur everywhere.

Ever noticed blemishes or pimples on your cheeks that just aren’t going away no matter which products you use? Ever wonder why your kidneys hurt constantly, but nothing is detected? Or perhaps you have an irritable bowel or embarrassing flatulence, even though you aren’t necessarily eating foods that would cause this. With the amounts of processed foods, medications, and hidden yeasts and chemicals we consume, our very important gut flora is often thrown out of whack. What is nutritionally beneficial to rectify this is the good bacteria that thrives in fermented foods. Below are 8 of the best that, when introduced slowly, will have your digestive tract better balanced and on the road to recovery.

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1. Tempeh

Made from soybeans, tempeh is a delicious (not to mention vegan/vegetarian) fermented food that can be cooked and prepared with any lunch or dinner in a stir-fry, burger, or even just with some veggies. Because it is made from soy beans, it is closely linked to tofu, though it is a less-processed version which is fermented and full of amino acids that are good for the gut. 

2. Pickles

Much like sauerkraut in their simple recipe of salt (and water), “real” pickles are made from cucumbers and spices, but can additionally include herbs for more flavor. Alternatively, any fermented vegetables are going to be good for your gut, so you can really get creative with this one and choose vegetables to your tastes. 

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3. Kefir

Kefir is a fermented milk drink which comes in the form of both milk or yoghurt, depending on what you prefer. It is, at first, an odd consistency – it almost tastes fizzy, as if it might have turned bad! This is just the live cultures buzzing. Kefir is an amazing source of probiotics and calcium. 

4. Natural yoghurt

Many yoghurts that we buy in the supermarket are packed with sugar, which is detrimental to the health of your stomach. If you can get your hands on a natural yoghurt, they are packed with probiotics and live cultures that rectify and aid imbalances — 100% Greek yoghurt is a good option.

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5. Miso

You might have first heard of miso as the Japanese soup sold in small doses at your favorite restaurant. It is, in fact, a paste that is made from barley, soy beans, or rice, and is full of live cultures that are good for the stomach. While stirring it into soups is the most common form of consumption, braver souls enjoy its flavor so much that they even spread it onto toast like peanut butter! 

6. Kombucha

Kombucha is a very ancient Chinese tea that was once known as the “tea of immortality.” Made from yeast bacteria, it is added to sweetened teas and then changed by the sugars into a bowl of incredible nutrients, including vitamin C, B vitamins, amino acids, organic acids, enzymes, and antibiotic tendencies. It is a mixing pot of good gut health!

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7. Sauerkraut

Sauerkraut is the traditional German dish of fermented cabbage. It might be an acquired taste, but as it is made from only cabbage and salt, it is a very healthy gut choice which is full of fiber and probiotics.

8. Kimchi

Kimchi is the Korean version of Sauerkraut. It is made with seasonings and thus has more flavor than the traditional sauerkraut, yet it is similarly packed with fiber and goodness. It is also being more widely used these days, and has been known to even taste good as a pizza topping!

Featured photo credit: Albumarium via albumarium.com

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

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