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11 Inspirational Podcasts To Lift You Up

11 Inspirational Podcasts To Lift You Up

The key advantage that audio brings us is convenience. We can listen while we’re commuting, exercising, or working, and the growth of podcasts are just starting.

As the popular saying goes, “You are who you surround yourself with.”

The same applies to what you read, what you watch, and in this case: what you listen to.

I’m an avid listener of podcasts, and I’ll get my hands on any show that will give me an edge in life.

To make your life simpler, here are 11 inspirational podcasts to lift you up:

1. Lewis Howes

Show: The School of Greatness
One-word description: Inspirational

Lewis Howes has been exploding in the podcasting scene over the past year and is consistently ranked as one of the top podcasts on the Health category of iTunes.

Notable guests on The School of Greatness includes Arianna Huffington, Tony Robbins, Tim Ferriss, and more, where they share how their journey started from the beginning to greatness.

With Lewis’ School of Greatness Book coming out in a few months, he has been putting out episodes 3 times a week, which includes guest interviews and solo rounds. My personal favorite is his 5-minute Fridays.

Lewis-Book

    2. Tim Ferriss

    Show: The Tim Ferriss Show
    One-word description: Analytical

    After hitting the NYTimes list with all 3 of his books, Tim Ferriss has been “experimenting” with his podcast show, which was awarded “Best of iTunes” in 2014.

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    The theme of The Tim Ferriss Show is “de-constructing excellence,” and with Tim’s vast network, he brings on the top performers in different industries to ask them questions like “what is your daily habit” and “who’s the first person you think of when you hear the word ‘success’?”

    With Tim’s quirky personality, you’ll also get to enjoy some random questions like “who’s the first person you think of when you hear ‘punchable’?”

    timferrissshowart-500x500

      3. James Altucher

      Show: The James Altucher Show
      One-word description: Transparent

      When most people think of James Altucher, they think honest, transparent, and vulnerable.

      James is not afraid to reveal it all, and help his listeners and readers learn from his mistakes, successes, and lessons.
      The great thing about James as a host is his curiosity.

      He’s willing to go above and beyond to ask his guests questions that the audience is already thinking in their heads.

      jamesaltucher

        4. Gary Vaynerchuk

        Show: The #AskGaryVee Show
        One-word description: Spontaneous

        Gary Vaynerchuk made it to the scene in the “Vlogging” world through his first show, Wine Library TV.

        Although The #AskGaryVee Show is intended to be “Video first,” he’s always keeping podcast listeners in mind by explaining the visuals of what’s happening on his show – and an added dose of spontaneity.

        Known as a social media guru, each episode is based around his fans asking him 3-5 questions on average on social media, where Gary gives his honest answer in return.

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        If you want your questions answered and a chance to be on the show, tweet @garyvee with your question and #askgaryvee in the tweet.

        garyvee

          5.Gretchen Rubin

          Show: Happier with Gretchen Rubin
          One-word description: Happy

          Gretchen is a well-known NYTimes Best Selling author, mostly known for her book, Happiness Project.

          She’s now extending this brand and fanbase into audio with her new show, Happier with Gretchen Rubin, that she hosts with her sister Elizabeth Craft.

          The podcast is already getting millions of downloads within only a few months of launching.

          If you’re looking to increase your happiness in life, Happier with Gretchen Rubin is worth checking out.

          GretchenRubin_2343089b

            6. Jack & Suzy Welch

            Show: WelchCast
            One-word description: Sharp

            Jack and Suzy Welch may be defined as one of the most “Powerful Couples” of this decade.

            While Suzy is a former editor-in-chief at Harvard Business Review and a NYTimes Best Selling Author, Jack is recognized as one of the greatest CEO’s of all time from his success at General Electric.

            If you want to get career advice and tips from some of the most successful people of our time, tune into the WelchCast.

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            welclhcast

              7. Tai Lopez

              Show: Tai Lopez Show

              One-word description: Insightful

              Tai is famous for reading “a book a day” and provides insightful summaries from the best books he reads.

              What’s great about Tai’s reviews is not the simple summaries of his books, but his own personal anecdotes and lessons in life that he shares alongside the book reviews.

              tai

                8. Chalene Johnson

                Show: The Chalene Show
                One-word description: Energetic

                As a fitness trainer, social media expert, life coach, author, and speaker, there seems that there’s very few things that Chalene can’t do.

                What stands Chalene out from others is her level of energy that she brings to each episode, in addition to the insights and advice she provides on social media and business growth.

                If you want to get pumped and become a better business owner along the way, check out The Chalene Show.

                chalene

                  9. Brian Rose

                  Show: London Real
                  One-word description: Deep

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                  Have you ever met someone that can sit down with you in one moment, and a few hours fly by without you even noticing?

                  The host of London Real, Brian Rose, teaches us how to be a great listener, while bringing on amazing guests to share their journey from successful entrepreneurs, creatives, authors, and more.

                  Notable guests include: Robert Greene, Aubrey De Grey, and Guy Kawasaki.

                    10. Kevin Rose

                    Show: The Foundation
                    One-word description: Savvy

                    The Foundation is a classic for any tech entrepreneurs wanting to learn from the best. Host of the show, Kevin Rose, is the founder of Digg and currently acts as a Partner of Google Ventures.

                    What’s amazing about The Foundation is the quality of production and the guests that Kevin brings on, such as Elon Musk.

                    foundation

                      11. Jordan Harbinger

                      Show: Art of Charm
                      One-word description:
                      Idiosyncratic

                      The title of this show describes it all. Jordan Harbinger brings his charm with every episode, and teaches his listeners on how to become extraordinary men, along with his guests.

                      Receiving over a million downloads per month, The Art of Charm is the go-to place for any men looking to become more successful in their personal and professional lives.

                      artofcharm

                        There you go, 11 best motivational podcasts to inspire your life. Do give yourself an extra advantage in life by listening to these meaningful podcasts. You are what you listen to!

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                        More by this author

                        Sean Kim

                        Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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                        Published on April 15, 2021

                        9 Steps to Make Self-Regulated Learning More Effective

                        9 Steps to Make Self-Regulated Learning More Effective

                        You have probably heard of the saying, “Give a man a fish, and he eats for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he eats for a lifetime.”

                        That old cliché gets thrown around quite a bit in educational circles, but what really goes into inspiring people to become independent, lifelong learners? Read on to learn more about self-regulated learning and how to make it more effective.

                        Self-Regulated Learning

                        One theory about teaching people how to learn is through self-regulated learning. In the broadest sense, it’s the idea that individuals should set their own learning goals and work independently and with a sense of agency and autonomy to achieve those goals. It’s the opposite of a teacher handing out a worksheet and students completing it just because the teacher told them to.

                        Self-regulated learning is constructive and self-directed.[1] Instead of the worksheet example, self-regulated learning involves the students setting their own learning goals, deciding how to best achieve those goals, and then systematically and strategically working toward them. Teaching strategies like the Workshop Model and Portfolios are more aligned with self-regulated learning than a one-size-fits-all worksheet or lecture.

                        Workshop Model

                        The workshop model consists of three parts. Class begins with a mini-lesson, then students spend time working independently while the teacher circulates conferencing with students. Finally, the class ends with some kind of summary derived from what students learned through their independent work.

                        Heavy hitters in the workshop model are Lucy Calkins and Nancie Atwell.[2][3] Their work has been instrumental in spreading best practices so that teachers know how to create truly student-led learning experiences.[4]

                        Portfolios

                        Another example of an instruction that’s moving toward self-regulated learning is student portfolios. Students set learning goals and periodically reflect on whether or not they’re achieving those goals. They keep all their reflections and student work in folders and have periodic conferences with their teacher on how they’re pressing toward their goals.[5]

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                        The problem though is that the workshop model and portfolios require a different mindset and skillset from teachers. That’s where the theory of self-regulated learning comes in.

                        3 Elements of Self-Regulated Learning

                        One approach to self-regulated learning is to break it down into three components: regulation of processing modes, regulation of the learning process, and regulation of self. Dividing self-regulated learning in this way helps teachers know how to best help students work toward their individual goals, and it also gives us a glimpse into how we all can become more self-regulated learners.

                        1. Regulation of Processing Modes

                        The first step in self-regulated learning is to give learners a choice in how and why they’re learning in the first place.

                        In our worksheet example, students are completing the task because the teacher said so, but when we reset why we’re learning in the first place, we’re starting to create a foundation for self-regulated learning.

                        One educational researcher, Noel Entwistle makes a distinction between three different reasons for learning, and his work makes what we’re all working toward a lot clearer. Students can try to reproduce or memorize information, they can try to get good grades, or they can seek personal understanding or meaning.[6]

                        The goal of self-regulated learning is to encourage students to move away from the first two learning orientations (following orders and trying to get good grades) and move toward the third, learning for some kind of intrinsic gain—learning to learn.

                        2. Regulation of Learning Process

                        The next level of self-regulated learning is when students are in charge of their own learning process. This is also known as metacognition. Studies have shown that when teachers do most of the heavy lifting—deciding what’s working and not working for each student—there’s a reduction in students’ metacognitive skills.[7]

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                        When I was teaching middle and high school, we had a saying that if we left the building at the end of the school day more tired than the students, we hadn’t done our job. What that means is that teachers have to find a way to get students to do the heavy lifting of metacognition—thinking about thinking. And students need to accept the challenge and become curious about what’s working and not working about their individualized and (at least, partially) self-generated learning plans.

                        Boosting metacognition might include learning about how the brain works, what metacognition is all about, and all the different learning styles. Becoming curious about your individual strengths and learning preferences is crucial in beefing up your metacognitive skills.

                        3. Regulation of Self

                        Finally, there’s goal setting. If students are going to become truly self-regulated learners, they have to start setting their own goals and then reflecting on their progress toward those goals.

                        How to Make Self-Regulated Learning More Effective

                        Now that you’ve learned the important elements of self-regulated learning, here are 9 ways you can make it more effective for you.

                        1. Change Your Mindset About Learning

                        The first way to become a self-regulated learner is to change your mindset about why you’re learning in the first place. Instead of doing your schoolwork because the teacher says so or because you want the highest GPA, try to move toward learning to satisfy your curiosity. Learn because you want to learn.

                        Sometimes, this will be easy, like when you’re learning something on your own that you’ve self-selected. Other times, it’s tougher, like when you have a teacher-selected assignment due.

                        Before mindlessly completing your assignment, try to find “your in.” Find what’s fascinating about the topic and cling to that as you complete it. Sure, you need to complete it to graduate, but by finding the morsel that’s interesting to you, you’ll be able to start experiencing a more self-regulated kind of learning.

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                        2. Explore Different Learning Styles

                        There are lots of different ways to learn: auditory, visual, spatial, and kinesthetic. Learn what all those styles mean and which ones feel especially effective for you.

                        3. Learn How Learning Works

                        Another great way to become a more self-regulated learner is to learn how learning works. Read up on cognitive science and psychology to figure out how we form memories, how we retain information, and how our emotions affect our learning. You have to understand the tools you’ve been given before you can wield those tools most optimally.

                        4. Get Introspective

                        Now it’s time to get introspective. Do a learning inventory and reflect on when you’ve been most and least successful in your learning.

                        What’s your best subject? Why? When did you lose interest in a subject? Why? Ask yourself tough questions about how you learn, so you can move forward more strategically.

                        5. Find Someone to Tell You Like It Is

                        It’s also helpful to find someone who can be honest about your learning strengths and weaknesses. Find someone you trust who will be honest about your learning progress. If you lack self-awareness about your learning style and abilities, it’s difficult to be a self-regulated learner, so work with someone else to start becoming more self-aware.

                        6. Set Some SMART Goals

                        Now it’s time to set some learning goals. SMART goals are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound. They’re a great way to become a self-regulated learner.[8]

                        Instead of just saying, “I want to get better at Spanish,” you might set a SMART goal by saying “I want to memorize 100 new Spanish vocabulary words by next week.” Next week, you can test yourself and measure whether or not you’ve achieved your goal.

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                        It’s difficult to see how we’re progressing and learning when our goal is vague. Setting SMART goals gives you a clear barometer for your learning.

                        7. Reflect on Your Progress

                        Goals don’t mean much unless you measure your progress every now and then. Take time to determine whether or not you’ve achieved your SMART learning goals and why or why not you did. Self-reflection is a great way to boost self-awareness, which is a great way to become a self-regulated learner.

                        8. Find Your Accountability Buddies

                        Armed with your goals and deadlines, it’s time to find some trustworthy people to help keep you accountable. Now, your learning progress is your responsibility when you’re a self-regulated learner, but it doesn’t hurt to have some friends who know what your goals are. You can turn to this trustworthy group to discuss your learning progress and keep you motivated.

                        9. Say It Loud and Proud

                        There’s a phenomenon where we’re more likely to attain our goals when we’ve made them public.[9] Announcing our goals helps hold our feet to the fire. So, figure out a way to make your learning goals known. This might mean telling your accountability buddies, your teacher, or maybe even a social media group.

                        Just know that you’re more likely to succeed when you’re not the only one who knows what your goals are.

                        Final Thoughts

                        Self-regulated learning is learning for learning’s sake. So, change your entire attitude about why you’re learning in the first place. Choose what you want to know more about or start with what interests you most when assigned a topic or project.

                        Then, set SMART goals and periodically reflect on your progress. Self-awareness is a skill that can be practiced and improved. Make learning your job and your responsibility, and you’ll be well on your way toward becoming a self-regulated learner.

                        You’ll never need to blame your learning struggles on someone or something else. Instead, you’ll have the self-awareness and abilities to be able to take your learning into your own hands and find a way forward no matter your current situation and limitations.

                        Featured photo credit: Josefa nDiaz via unsplash.com

                        Reference

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