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Last Updated on September 2, 2019

You Are What You Listen To: 11 Podcasts To Inspire Yourself

You Are What You Listen To: 11 Podcasts To Inspire Yourself

The key advantage that audio brings us is convenience. We can listen while we’re commuting, exercising, or working, and the growth of podcasts are just starting.

As the popular saying goes, “You are who you surround yourself with.”

The same applies to what you read, what you watch, and in this case: what you listen to.

I’m an avid listener of podcasts, and I’ll get my hands on any show that will give me an edge in life.

To make your life simpler, here are 11 podcasts to inspire yourself.

1. Lewis Howes

Show: The School of Greatness
One-word description: Inspirational

Lewis Howes has been exploding in the podcasting scene over the past year and is consistently ranked as one of the top podcasts on the Health category of iTunes.

Notable guests on The School of Greatness includes Arianna Huffington, Tony Robbins, Tim Ferriss, and more, where they share how their journey started from the beginning to greatness.

With Lewis’ School of Greatness Book coming out in a few months, he has been putting out episodes 3 times a week, which includes guest interviews and solo rounds. My personal favorite is his 5-minute Fridays.

Lewis-Book

    2. Tim Ferriss

    Show: The Tim Ferriss Show
    One-word description: Analytical

    After hitting the NYTimes list with all 3 of his books, Tim Ferriss has been “experimenting” with his podcast show, which was awarded “Best of iTunes” in 2014.

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    The theme of The Tim Ferriss Show is “de-constructing excellence,” and with Tim’s vast network, he brings on the top performers in different industries to ask them questions like “what is your daily habit” and “who’s the first person you think of when you hear the word ‘success’?”

    With Tim’s quirky personality, you’ll also get to enjoy some random questions like “who’s the first person you think of when you hear ‘punchable’?”

    timferrissshowart-500x500

      3. James Altucher

      Show: The James Altucher Show
      One-word description: Transparent

      When most people think of James Altucher, they think honest, transparent, and vulnerable.

      James is not afraid to reveal it all, and help his listeners and readers learn from his mistakes, successes, and lessons.
      The great thing about James as a host is his curiosity.

      He’s willing to go above and beyond to ask his guests questions that the audience is already thinking in their heads.

      jamesaltucher

        4. Gary Vaynerchuk

        Show: The #AskGaryVee Show
        One-word description: Spontaneous

        Gary Vaynerchuk made it to the scene in the “Vlogging” world through his first show, Wine Library TV.

        Although The #AskGaryVee Show is intended to be “Video first,” he’s always keeping podcast listeners in mind by explaining the visuals of what’s happening on his show – and an added dose of spontaneity.

        Known as a social media guru, each episode is based around his fans asking him 3-5 questions on average on social media, where Gary gives his honest answer in return.

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        If you want your questions answered and a chance to be on the show:
        Tweet @garyvee with your question and #askgaryvee in the tweet.

        garyvee

          5.Gretchen Rubin

          Show: Happier with Gretchen Rubin
          One-word description: Happy

          Gretchen is a well-known NYTimes Best Selling author, mostly known for her book, Happiness Project.

          She’s now extending this brand and fanbase into audio with her new show, Happier with Gretchen Rubin, that she hosts with her sister Elizabeth Craft.

          The podcast is already getting millions of downloads within only a few months of launching.

          If you’re looking to increase your happiness in life, Happier with Gretchen Rubin is worth checking out.

          GretchenRubin_2343089b

            6. Jack & Suzy Welch

            Show: WelchCast
            One-word description: Sharp

            Jack and Suzy Welch may be defined as one of the most “Powerful Couples” of this decade.

            While Suzy is a former editor-in-chief at Harvard Business Review and a NYTimes Best Selling Author, Jack is recognized as one of the greatest CEO’s of all time from his success at General Electric.

            If you want to get career advice and tips from some of the most successful people of our time, tune into the WelchCast.

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            welclhcast

              7. Tai Lopez

              Show: Tai Lopez Show

              One-word description: Insightful

              Tai is famous for reading “a book a day” and provides insightful summaries from the best books he reads.

              What’s great about Tai’s reviews is not the simple summaries of his books, but his own personal anecdotes and lessons in life that he shares alongside the book reviews.

              tai

                8. Chalene Johnson

                Show: The Chalene Show
                One-word description: Energetic

                As a fitness trainer, social media expert, life coach, author, and speaker, there seems that there’s very few things that Chalene can’t do.

                What stands Chalene out from others is her level of energy that she brings to each episode, in addition to the insights and advice she provides on social media and business growth.

                If you want to get pumped and become a better business owner along the way, check out The Chalene Show.

                chalene

                  9. Brian Rose

                  Show: London Real
                  One-word description: Deep

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                  Have you ever met someone that can sit down with you in one moment, and a few hours fly by without you even noticing?

                  The host of London Real, Brian Rose, teaches us how to be a great listener, while bringing on amazing guests to share their journey from successful entrepreneurs, creatives, authors, and more.

                  Notable guests include: Robert Greene, Aubrey De Grey, and Guy Kawasaki.

                  london-real

                    10. Kevin Rose

                    Show: The Foundation
                    One-word description: Savvy

                    The Foundation is a classic for any tech entrepreneurs wanting to learn from the best. Host of the show, Kevin Rose, is the founder of Digg and currently acts as a Partner of Google Ventures.

                    What’s amazing about The Foundation is the quality of production and the guests that Kevin brings on, such as Elon Musk.

                    foundation

                      11. Jordan Harbinger

                      Show: Art of Charm
                      One-word description:
                      Idiosyncratic

                      The title of this show describes it all. Jordan Harbinger brings his charm with every episode, and teaches his listeners on how to become extraordinary men, along with his guests.

                      Receiving over a million downloads per month, The Art of Charm is the go-to place for any men looking to become more successful in their personal and professional lives.

                      artofcharm

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                        Sean Kim

                        Sean is the founder and CEO of Rype, a language learning app. He's an entrepreneur and blogger.

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                        Last Updated on December 11, 2019

                        The Only Way to Remember Everything You Have Read

                        The Only Way to Remember Everything You Have Read

                        Our brains aren’t made to remember everything that we encounter. Unless you’re one of the rare individuals who has a photographic memory, it’s likely that details about the content you consume fade quickly.

                        How often do you recall reading an article, but forgetting what it’s about? Have you ever recognized a movie title but failed to remember the plot? If you frequently forget the things you’ve read and the movies you’ve watched, you aren’t alone.

                        Think about what you had for lunch yesterday or what you did last weekend. Those memories are probably blurry because they aren’t critical for your survival. Our brains have about 8 GB of capacity for immediate recall, and only the most essential information will make the cut. This can leave us with a blurred picture of nonessential information. Learn more about this in my other article: You’ve Been Using Your Brain Wrong: Human Brains Aren’t Designed to Remember Things

                        The human brain is not designed to help you handle with massive amounts of data. We’re bombarded with stimuli every day. If we processed and remembered everything, then it would probably make it difficult for us to function. Your brain sorts through all your experiences to weed out the significant and insignifcant things that we encounter.[1]

                        The first time you read something, finishing it is the only aim.

                        It doesn’t matter how much you’ve been looking forward to seeing a movie or reading a book. Unless the content is linked to your survival, chances are that you’ll forget what you’ve seen or read soon after viewing it.

                        Part of this is because your primary objective was to watch the film or read the book. When you’ve never seen something, your urge to finish the story is your main concern. After you’ve satisfied your desire, you probably won’t remember what you’ve seen. Finishing the movie or book is not the same as remembering all the details.

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                        Human beings store memories through a process called encoding. Our brain is better at encoding information when it can associate new information with pre-existing experiences.[2]

                        The first time we encounter information is akin to us passing strangers on the street. Your neurons process that you’ve encountered someone, and that’s the end of it. There’s no recognition, and after you leave the situation, you probably won’t remember who you saw.

                          Some people do remember what they see, though. Why?

                          You might feel frustrated when you can’t recall what you’ve just seen, but it can be even more maddening when you run into someone who seems to have absorbed everything. This is the friend that recites details from the movies that you watched months ago. Long after the finer points of a text have slipped your mind, they’re still talking about it. How do they do it?

                          These people don’t have extraordinary memories. They simply take in the information actively. Since they’re actively processing information, they are able to experience the book details or the movie scenes repeatedly in a short time. They revise and synthesize the information so that it becomes their own.

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                            It’s like taking the same route every day and running into the same people. You begin to recognize people and observe more about them because they are already familiar to you. Likewise, your neurons can easily make new connections when they have been asked to revisit and analyze new information instead of passively observing it.

                            The key is to see, connect, and then repeat.

                            The more you actively engage with the content that you are consuming, the more readily you’ll remember it. As your neurons revisit the same subject over and over, it’s easier for them to make new connections.

                            Think of it like taking a walk through the woods. At first there is no path, but if you take the same route every day, eventually, you’ll create a trail. You’ll be able to move quickly and easily in a place where you used to have to move slowly. Your brain handles memory like this too. You want to build a well-worn path for your neurons.

                            Don’t rely on your initial memory

                            The first time you go through something, you’ll probably forget many details. You may find it difficult to absorb specifics because there’s too much new information. When you watch movies or read books, you may find yourself obsessed with what will happen next. Your goal is just to get to the end.

                            It’s helpful to revisit the content several times. You may find that since you already know what happens, you’ll be able to appreciate the details.

                            Replaying or rereading isn’t enough

                            You can look at the same piece of information over and over, but it doesn’t mean that it will stay in your head. Rote memorization (memorizing by repetition) doesn’t allow you to make meaningful connections with what you’re seeing.[3]

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                            To remember something, you need to apply it. Instead of passively taking in information or actively trying to memorize it by rote, it’s important to make connections. If you can apply what you’ve learned, get feedback, and re-apply a concept with feedback, it’s much more likely to stick.

                            For example, reading a recipe alone won’t help you learn to cook. Cooking a meal and having the combined feedback of your taste-buds and the comments of others will stand out in your mind. Watching someone do an exercise never has the same impact as doing it yourself. A framework is all but useless unless you apply it.

                            When you apply a concept or practice to your life, it becomes easier to internalize the information. Think about the first time you had to travel to work versus now. At first, you had to think about each step on the route, but now, you don’t even have to think about it. It is the combination of repetition and application that solidifies neuron connections.

                            Have a question at the back of your mind before you read/watch it

                            When you pick up a book or sit down to watch a movie, have a purpose in mind. If you don’t, your default mode will simply be to get to the end of the book or film. Have a question that you’d like to answer before you begin.

                            For example, reading The Power of Habit without a purpose will not be very helpful. It will seem useless to anyone who isn’t ready to build a habit no matter how good the book is. On the other hand, if you think of a bad habit that you’d like to quit before you start reading, you can instantly connect what you’re reading with your own life.

                            When you spot related chapters or ideas in books, find ways to connect them. Highlight them, write notes, or clip the sections that are related. Taking notes by hand is an especially valuable way to help you remember important concepts.[4]

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                            People who watch lots of movies or read lots of books, but can’t remember them, waste a lot of time. They haven’t taken in any information that will actually help them. To avoid forgetting everything you see, apply it immediately after you see it, and revisit the concepts often.

                            Have a mind like a steel trap

                            Chances are that by tomorrow you will forget what you’ve read in this article unless you save it, highlight it, and make a point of relating it to your life. Bookmark this and come back to it so that you can remember what you need to do to have better recall on the media you consume.

                            Watching movies and reading mindlessly is a a waste of time. Make the most of everything that you see and read by finding ways to engage with the content. Think of what you’ll be missing if you allow these learning opportunities to pass you by.

                            Featured photo credit: Vecteezy via vecteezy.com

                            Reference

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