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10 Signs That You’re Probably Bad In Your Job

10 Signs That You’re Probably Bad In Your Job

Are you wondering if you’re bad in your job? In today’s world of high job turnover and career jumps, it’s important to keep up if you want to keep your job. If a job isn’t working for you, then it’s best to keep an eye on new opportunities that might come your way. After all, staying with a company for years (and years and years) is becoming a thing of the past. But sometimes it’s hard to tell if your job isn’t right for you, or if you’re just plain bad at it. So we’ve compiled 10 signs to help you figure it out.

1. You Keep Getting Left Out

Sometimes when you’re about to get the axe, other parties at the company will be notified ahead of time (both for workload reasons and through the grapevine). A lot of times, if you’re the next to go, people will avoid including you in social events so they won’t have to face awkward questions.

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2. Your Boss Avoids You

Similar to #1, a huge indicator that you might be on the chopping block is if your boss is avoiding you. Obviously as a subordinate, you normally have numerous, extended conversations with your boss. If these suddenly start to taper off, then it’s probably an indicator that he or she is waiting for the right time to bring up the bad news.

3. Your Workload Gets Lighter

If you start noticing that less and less work is coming down the pipeline, that’s usually a bad sign. It’s an indicator that a conversation has taken place on the top level about limiting the amount of responsibilities you have. That way there is less of a chance that your performance will affect a large part of the business. This is also a way for the company to start giving your work to other employees who will be there for a while.

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4. You Receive Less Important Assignments

In addition to limiting your amount of work, managers who know you will soon be let go will stop giving you large-scale, high-level assignments. By doing this, they are both ensuring that none of your work will be left over after you leave and that your performance issues won’t affect an important part of the business.

5. You Feel Overwhelmed Despite a Light Workload

If you are starting to feel overwhelmed but notice that your workload is comparable (or much lighter) than fellow employees, this could be an indicator that you aren’t a great fit for the position. While this one is less of a red flag that people are considering letting you go, it is a way to tell if you aren’t exactly cut out for the job. A good way to amend this is to try to stay on top of your work by making priority lists or put in a few extra hours a week.

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6. You Remain at Your Job Level for a Long Time

One of the best pieces of advice a jobseeker receives is this: if they are at a position for two or more years without any upward motion or change in title, then it is probably a good idea to look for another job. This indicates that you aren’t being challenged appropriately, and that perhaps there isn’t much of a future in this position. This is also an indicator that the higher-ups don’t have much faith in you over the long-term.

7. You Start to See Other Employees Taking Over Your Work

If you start to notice that other employees are working on similar projects as you, then this could mean your manager has assigned it to them to prepare for your departure. Similarly, if a colleague outright asks you details about how you complete your projects (when they haven’t shown much interest before), this could mean that they are preparing to take your work over soon—a red flag that you might be considered expendable.

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8. You See More IT or HR Restrictions

If you start to notice that you’re locked out of certain servers or accounts (when you weren’t before), then this might be a sign of preparation for you being fired. Sometimes the first place this is seen occurs with VPN or remote access. If you suddenly aren’t allowed to access admin files or your email account when you aren’t in the office, then your privileges may have been revoked. This is usually step one for the IT team to ensure information safety when an employee leaves.

9. You Are Allowed to Slack Off

If you start to see less interest in your tardiness, whereabouts or general performance, then this could be a sign that your employer is “cutting their losses.” In other words, if they are going to let you go within a couple of weeks, they might not be concerned if you show up late or if you take a super long lunch break. While this might seem nice, it could mean your days are numbered.

10. You Aren’t Invited to as Many Team Meetings

 Finally, if you notice that your meeting invites are decreasing and you see that subsets of your team are still attending the same general amount of meetings, then you could be on the shortlist to be let go. This is, again, a way for an employer to wean you off of forthcoming projects as to make the transition smoother. Similarly, if you are a part-time employee and you are being assigned to fewer and fewer shifts, your time at the company could be coming to a close.

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Last Updated on July 16, 2020

How to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Email Examples)

How to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Email Examples)

Generally, if you’re in a position to decline a job offer, it’s a high-quality problem. Maybe you were offered a better position at a different company, or perhaps you were offered the same position at a different organization but for better pay (or perks). Or maybe, after sitting down and discussing the offer with your family, you decided that the travel requirements were too intense. Perhaps the company where you currently work agreed to match the new offer, and once you examined the pros and cons, you realized it made more sense to stay.

Whatever the reason[1], your charge now is knowing how to decline a job offer gracefully. As a courtesy to the company who extended you the job offer, you want to decline quickly, giving the hiring manager a chance to make the offer to the candidate who was the runner-up for the job. You also want to express your appreciation. And, given today’s rocky economy, it makes sense to politely decline the job offer in a way that will hopefully keep the door open for you should your circumstances change.

If you’re not sure how to decline a job offer, check out the following tips to get through it.

3 Ways to Decline a Job Offer Gracefully (With Examples)

1. Show Gratitude

The hiring manager likely spent several hours on your job application—between reading your cover letter, reviewing your resume, and interviewing you either in person or via a videoconferencing platform. Recruitment is a long and sometimes tedious process for any employer. There is always competition for every open job, and the hiring manager may have pushed your candidacy over others in the queue.

For these reasons, your note needs to express thoughtfulness and genuine appreciation. That said, it needn’t be lengthy.

The following example is concise and expresses gratitude in several ways, providing a good example for how you can decline a job offer gracefully:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s last name],

Thank you for offering me the position of _______ [job title] with _________ [company name]. I greatly appreciate the vote of confidence that comes with your offer. However, after carefully considering the opportunities for career advancement, I have decided to stay where I am.

I sincerely thank you for the time and consideration you devoted to my application, interview, and follow-up. I appreciate your graciousness and consummate professionalism throughout.

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I wish you success in all the company’s undertakings that you outlined. Thank you again for extending the opportunity to work with you.

Sincerely,

[Your name]

2. Give a Reason, but Don’t Elaborate

If you had several interviews at the company, then saying why you are turning down the offer shows respect and professional courtesy. It’s fine to say that you took a different job offer, decided to stay at your company, or even felt that the salary was not sufficient. The trick is to say it succinctly.

The following example does just that:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. _______ [Hiring manager’s name],

I greatly appreciate your offer of the position of _______ [job title]. I was very impressed with you and the staff members who interviewed me, as well as the direction of the company. I regret, however, that I must decline your offer due to the salary offered.

I sincerely appreciate the opportunity to have met you and your team and to learn about your company. Again, I am grateful for the positive interviewing experience with your company and for the job offer.

I wish great success with your plans to move forward.

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Best regards,

[Your name]

3. Offer to Stay in Touch

This technique isn’t for everyone, but if you felt a strong connection with the person who interviewed you, or if you could see yourself working at the company in a few years, it might make sense to offer to keep in touch.

Remember that hiring managers switch companies, too, and it’s always a good idea to have a hiring manager think well of you!

The following example includes an offer to stay in touch in a gentle way:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s name],

I am writing to personally thank you for offering me the position of ________ [job title] at _______[company name]. I enjoyed meeting you and having a chance to meet the other members of the team. It was an extremely difficult decision for me, but I have accepted a position at another company.

I genuinely appreciate the time you devoted to interviewing me and to sharing your insights on the direction of the company. I hope we might stay in touch as I value your visionary ideas about our industry’s future.

Again, thank you for your time and consideration, and I wish you all the best for your continued success.

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Respectfully,

[Your name]

Should You Hold out for Your Dream Job?

If you interviewed with two companies, and your dream company is dragging out its decision while your second choice company has made you an offer, what’s the best direction to take? As long as the job offer from your second choice company is in keeping with your goals for upward mobility, added responsibility, and increased salary, you are better off accepting the extended offer for two reasons.

First, the reason the dream company is prolonging the process may be because it has made an offer to another and is negotiating with another candidate. Second, if you accept another offer and withdraw your candidacy from the dream company, the hiring manager will note your desirability to another (possibly competing) employer and may try to recruit you in the future.

It is the epitome of poor form to decline a job after accepting it, even if your dream company finally comes through with an offer. This puts the company that made the original offer in a huge bind, particularly if it has already sent rejections to its other candidates and is taking steps for on-boarding you. This could make you a pariah at the company, and in any industry, news travels fast and far.

The Best Medium for Declining a Job Offer

Should you send your response via email? Or pick up the telephone and call the hiring manager? The most professional response is to use the same method they used to extend you the offer. If they offered you the job via email, then feel free to email your reply. If they called you or left a voicemail message, then picking up the telephone is the preferred method. Do your best to call during business hours.

To be as poised as possible, you may want to write out your rejection and practice saying it a few times. Time it to make sure it does not exceed 30 seconds. (Even if you leave a voicemail, you may need to also write them an email for their records.)

If the hiring manager wants to chat further, don’t give the impression that you want to quickly end the call. Give the conversation your full attention to let the employer know that you value the relationship that you have built. It’s important not to burn bridges if you should decide to apply at the company again in the future—or at another company where the manager happens to transfer to. Remain discreet, but converse with decorum if the other party wants to prolong the conversation.

Dotting I’s and Crossing T’s

Always include your contact information, including your phone number, although the company already has it. Double check your communication for typos. If you know a candidate that you believe would be a perfect fit for the job, you may want to mention it. (First make sure he or she really wants the job, though. Reach out to them before suggesting their name.)

Be sure to send your email within normal business hours. Remember that you are not trying to avoid the hiring manager—you’re opening up a line of communication with her or him that you may well use again down the road.

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When They Go Low, You Go High

Granted, not every potential employer has a winning personality. You may have decided well before the offer was extended that this was not a person with whom you wished to work. Or, the company culture[2] may have felt like it would not be a good fit, and you’ve since corroborated the incompatible impression with people in your network.

Whatever gut feelings signaled to you that you needed to turn down an offer, don’t include or even allude to them in your rejection letter[3]. Stating that the position is not the right fit for you and your career is all that you need to disclose.

This final example is for when you prefer not to disclose the reason for your rejection, and you’re looking for a kind, concise way of turning down the job:

Subject Line: Job Offer – [Your Name]

Dear Mr./Ms. ________[Hiring manager’s name],

I genuinely appreciate your taking the time to interview me and the consideration you gave me as a job candidate. I have, however, decided to decline your offer of the ______ [job title], as I have come to realize that the position is not the right fit for me at this time.

I wish you well in your search for the best-suited candidate.

Cordially,

[Your name]

Final Thoughts

Learning how to decline a job offer politely and professionally will keep you in good graces with the prospective employer and help the person better accept your rejection. Let the person know that your change of heart in pursuing a new job isn’t personal, and that you found the experience rewarding.

When you show gratitude and let the hiring manager know that the time and effort invested in you is appreciated, you continue to strengthen your professional standing.

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Featured photo credit: Christina @ wocintechchat.com via unsplash.com

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