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11 Tools to Help You Keep Track of Your Remote Employees

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11 Tools to Help You Keep Track of Your Remote Employees

As the workforce continues to grow and change, so does the kind and location of employees. Outsourcing and telecommuting are quickly becoming a normal part of the workday. But, as an employer, it can be difficult to keep an eye on your employees if they don’t (or can’t) come into the office. How can you be sure that they’re working and not watching funny videos all day?

While it’s definitely important to trust your employees, you can also have the additional security of knowing when they’re working for you. Here are eleven tools to help you monitor your staff even when you don’t work in the same place.

1. Google+ Hangouts

This is a common option because the name will be easily recognized, virtually anyone can have access to it and it’s also a free service. There are limits to this service, however, one of which is an occupant max per conference call.  This is also a great option because of how flexible and well-known the brand is. You can coordinate meetings and conference calls across the various mobile platforms, both on Android or iPhone.

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2. Ximble

With a low monthly cost and various features, Ximble is a great choice for employee tracking. There is multilanguage support so you can communicate across countries. There is a feature that allows you to complete your staff payroll easily and without any extra hassle. They offer a mobile component so you can be aware of any changes or issues even if you are on the go.

3. Freckle

If you don’t want to add any clutter to your computer, this is a great piece of software. Operating out of your web browser, Freckle lets you track projects, remote employee time usage and create invoices to better organize your workspace. They also offer a free trial so you can test it before you commit.

4. LiquidPlanner

This software specializes in project portfolio management and individual project tracking. When your employees are working, they have the option of either running a real-time clock or entering their time manually. It also utilizes a timesheet feature, which lets you combine multiple, repeated tasks so you can be better records.

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5. WORKetc

This web-based tool is actually a combination of systems. This software manages projects, billing, sales and other tasks. This program also lets you be as free with your own telecommuting as your employees. You can access the software wherever you are so you can follow your employees as they work.

6. Trigger

Trigger is a time-tracking software that also has tables meant for client information tracking. If you’re in sales, your team can create different categories and manage their information. Using the different color grids, which will let you track your employees easily by name and picture. It’s also one of the cheaper options.

7. iDoneThis

If you’re looking for a tracker that doesn’t require your constant attention, this is it. This software tracking system allows you to get updates without any extra typing or input. Your remote employees are required to submit an email that lists their daily completed tasks. The email is automatically sent to you for review, with the compiled data from each worker. By having each worker input what they actually completed versus just how much time was used, you can track achievements too.

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8. Timely

Boasting an easy-to-use interface, Timely is one of the best time monitoring apps. Instead of a general time clock, it has project-specific trackers. This way you’ll be able to learn how much time you need for a project. There is also the useful feature of email notification, which will alert you in case the project clock is still going.

9. MySammy

MySammy is another of the more in-depth trackers available. It doesn’t have cursor tracking but instead uses a bar graph to represent productivity. It displays productively used time in green and other, less work-related time in red. What’s nice is that what gets the red or green placement is entirely up to you. They offer a month-long free trial and have one of the cheaper payment options.

10. TSheets

One of the hassles of remote employees is coordinating their available schedules. You also have to worry about managing pre-work punch-ins and post-shift punch outs. TSheets has more than one option for your employees to record their time so you’ll always be up to date with this information.

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11. Worksnaps

This is another time-tracking software choice for those who need more frequent and more detailed status updates. Along with time, this will what your employees type as well as mouse movements. It takes screenshots every ten minutes and also makes a list of which applications your employees are using.

Featured photo credit: StartupStockPhotos via pixabay.com

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Last Updated on November 25, 2021

How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

    What Does Private Browsing Do?

    When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

    For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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    The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

    The Terminal Archive

    While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

    Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

    dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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    Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

    Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

    However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

    Clearing Your Tracks

    Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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    dscacheutil -flushcache

    As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

    Other Browsers and Private Browsing

    Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

    If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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    As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

    Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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