Advertising
Advertising

11 Sinfully Easy Sangria Recipes

11 Sinfully Easy Sangria Recipes

The idea behind sangria is simple: Take some wine and add nice things to it until you can’t resist pouring it all over ice and enjoying with friends. Of course, some recipes call for extra time in the fridge and most can be consumed by yourself.

I’ve gathered five of my favorite sangria recipes and included links to six others with an explanation of what makes each unique. Be creative, take your time, and enjoy the process. Enjoy!

    1. Ginger Brunch Sangria

    This sangria recipe is wonderful for early summer afternoons when the sun is hot and you’d like something refreshing and fruit-laden without too much alcohol!

    Ingredients:

    • 1 Bottle of red wine
    • 1 Lemon cut into wedges
    • 1 Orange cut into wedges
    • 1 Lime cut into wedges
    • 2 Tbsp sugar
    • Splash of orange juice or lemonade
    • 2 Shots of gin or triple sec (optional)
    • 1 Cup of raspberries or strawberries (may use thawed or frozen)
    • 1 Small can of diced pineapples (with juice)
    • 4 Cups ginger ale

    Preparation:

    Pour wine into a large pitcher and squeeze the juice wedges from the lemon, orange and lime into the wine. Toss in the fruit wedges and pineapple then add sugar, orange juice and gin. Chill overnight. Add ginger ale, berries and ice just before serving. If you’d like to serve right away, use chilled red wine and serve over lots of ice.

    Advertising

    Serves: 3-4

    (source, image)

      2. White Sangria

      This sangria has quite a bit more kick than the brunch sangria. Perfect for a warm evening with friends who all have safe rides home! =)

      Ingredients:

      • 2 apples, cored and coarsely diced
      • 2 pears, cored and coarsely diced
      • 2 juice oranges, peeled, seeded and diced
      • 1 cup gin
      • 1/2 cup triple sec
      • 3 bottles (500 milliliters each) manzanilla sherry or 2 bottles (750 milliliters each) dry white wine
      • 1/2 bottle cava (1 1/2 cups), chilled.

      Preparation:

      1. Place all fruit in a bowl with gin and triple sec. Cover and refrigerate at least 4 hours, or overnight.
      2. Transfer to a large pitcher and add manzanilla or white wine. Stir. Divide liquid and fruit into wine glasses, over ice if desired, until about 2/3 full. Top each with cava.

      Serves: 8 to 10

      (source, image)

        3. Mango-Peach Sangria

        This complex sangria celebrates the nuance of the Viognier amidst the sweet gyrations of sweet mango and minted peaches.

        Advertising

        Ingredients:

        • 1/3 cup sugar
        • 1/3 cup water
        • 1 cup Grand Marnier
        • 1 bottle Viognier
        • 1 mango, chopped
        • 2 peaches, cut into thin wedges
        • 1/4 cup mint

        Preparation:

        In a saucepan, cook the sugar and water until the sugar dissolves; transfer to a pitcher and refrigerate until cold. Stir in the Grand Marnier, Viognier, mango, peaches and mint and serve over ice.

        Serves: 2-3

        (source, image)

          4. Sangria Perea

          Guy Fieri swears by this sangria though I’ve found the peach brandy can take over if the lemons and limes aren’t especially juicy. As always, fresh and juicy fruit will go a long way toward making your sangria one to remember!

          Ingredients:

          Advertising

          • 3 cups ice cubes
          • 1/4 cup lemon slices
          • 1/4 cup lime slices
          • 1/4 cup orange, slices
          • 1/4 cup pineapple chunks
          • 1/4 cup seedless grapes
          • 2 cups red wine
          • 1/2 cup peach brandy
          • 1 cup orange juice
          • 1 cup lemon/lime soda

          Directions:

          In a pitcher, add all the ingredients and stir to combine. Ideally, you want to wait about 1 hour for the fruit and the wine to infuse each other, but you can drink it right away.

          Serves: 6 rocks glasses

          (source, image)

            5. Grapefruit Sangria

            The zest of the grapefruit adds a special zing to this sangria. Use grapefruit soda in place of the ginger ale for added punch!

            Ingredients:

            • 1 bottle of juicy red wine
            • 1 orange
            • 1 lime
            • 1/2 grapefruit
            • 1/2 lemon
            • 3 tablespoons Grand Marnier
            • 1-2 tablespoons granulated sugar
            • Ice cubes
            • 6 ounces ginger ale

            Pour the wine into a large pitcher. Wash the orange, lime, and lemon. Cut them into thin slices and add to the pitcher. Add the Grand Marnier and the sugar. Marinate for a few hours. (The sangria will taste better if you leave it overnight.)

            When ready to serve, fill the pitcher with ice cubes, add the soda, and stir well. Serve with a wooden spoon in the pitcher.

            Advertising

            Serves: 3-5

            (source, image)

            6. Spicy Sangria – Argentinian Malbec to compliment the hot sauce!

            7. Citrus Sangria – Cointreau, confectioner’s sugar, and club soda for a twist!

            8. Sangria Clara – Fresh mint, sparkling apple cider, and cinnamon sticks… delicious!

            9. Cranberry & Strawberry Sangria – Cloves, cranberry juice and herbal tea deliver a sensuous mix.

            10. Pineapple Sangria – Pineapple, coconut rum, and ginger ale dance a tropical number!

            11. Rose Sangria Spritzer– Raspberries, mint, and the mild flavor of the wine make for a wonderful sipping experience.

            Do you have a sangria recipe or memory you’d like to share?

            More by this author

            21 First Date Ideas 11 Sinfully Easy Sangria Recipes Sleep Hack: A Simple Strategy For Better Rest In Less Time Lifehack 5-Day Early Riser Challenge Final What Advice Would You Give To Your 18 Year Old Self?

            Trending in Featured

            1 Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny 2 How to Become an Expert (And Spot out One Nearby) 3 How to Find Your Passion and Live a Fulfilling Life 4 How to Stay Motivated and Reach Your Goals 5 5 Key Characteristics of a Successful Entrepreneur

            Read Next

            Advertising
            Advertising

            Last Updated on September 17, 2018

            Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

            Why Do I Have Bad Luck? 2 Simple Things to Change Your Destiny

            Are you one of those people who are always suffering setbacks? Does little ever seem to go right for you? Do you sometimes feel that the universe is out to get you? Do you wonder:

            Why do I have bad luck?

            Let me let you into a secret:

            Your luck is no worse—and no better—than anyone else’s. It just feels that way. Better still, there are two simple things you can do which will reverse your feelings of being unlucky.

            1. Stop believing that what happens in your life is down to the vagaries of luck, destiny, supernatural forces, malevolent other people, or anything else outside your self.

            Psychologists call this “external locus of control.” It’s a kind of fatalism, where people believe that they can do little or nothing personally to change their lives.

            Because of this, they either merely hope for the best, focus on trying to change their luck by various kinds of superstition, or submit passively to whatever comes—while complaining that it doesn’t match their hopes.

            Advertising

            Most successful people take the opposite view. They have “internal locus of control.” They believe that what happens in their life is nearly all down to them; and that even when chance events occur, what is important is not the event itself, but how you respond to it.

            This makes them pro-active, engaged, ready to try new things, and keen to find the means to change whatever in their lives they don’t like.

            They aren’t fatalistic and they don’t blame bad luck for what isn’t right in their world. They look for a way to make things better.

            Are they luckier than the others? Of course not.

            Luck is random—that’s what chance means—so they are just as likely to suffer setbacks as anyone else.

            What’s different is their response. When things go wrong, they quickly look for ways to put them right. They don’t whine, pity themselves, or complain about “bad luck.” They try to learn from what happened to avoid or correct it next time and get on with living their life as best they can.

            Advertising

            No one is habitually luckier or unluckier than anyone else. It may seem so, over the short term (Random events often come in groups, just as random numbers often lie close together for several instances—which is why gamblers tend to see patterns where none exist).

            When you take a longer perspective, random chance is just . . . random. Yet those who feel that they are less lucky, typically pay far more attention to short-term instances of bad luck, convincing themselves of the correctness of their belief.

            Your locus of control isn’t genetic. You learned it somehow. If it isn’t working for you, change it.

            2. Remember that whatever you pay attention to grows in your mind.

            If you focus on what’s going wrong in your life—especially if you see it as “bad luck” you can do nothing about—it will seem blacker and more malevolent.

            In a short time, you’ll become so convinced that everything is against you that you’ll notice more and more instances where this appears to be true. As a result, you will almost certainly stop trying, convinced that nothing you can do will improve your prospects.

            Fatalism feeds on itself until people become passive “victims” of life’s blows. The “losers” in life are those who are convinced they will fail before they start anything; sure that their “bad luck” will ruin any prospects of success.

            Advertising

            They rarely notice that the true reasons for their failure are ignorance, laziness, lack of skill, lack of forethought, or just plain foolishness—all of which they could do something to correct, if only they would stop blaming other people or “bad luck” for their personal deficiencies.

            Your attention is under your control. Send it where you want it to go. Starve the negative thoughts until they die.

            To improve your fortune, first decide that what happens is nearly always down to you; then try focusing on what works and what turns out well, not the bad stuff.

            Your “fate” really does depend on the choices that you make. When random events happen, as they always will, do you choose to try to turn them to your advantage or just complain about them?

            Thomas Jefferson is said to have used these words:

            “I’m a great believer in luck and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

            Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

            “Shallow men believe in luck. Strong men believe in cause and effect.”

            Your luck, in the end, is pretty much what you choose it to be.

            Featured photo credit: LoboStudio Hamburg via unsplash.com

            Read Next