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6 Simple Steps to Fix a Really Bad Day

6 Simple Steps to Fix a Really Bad Day

So you had a bad day? A really terrible, awful, horrible, no good kind of day?

Feels awful, doesn’t it? We all have them. One of those days when nothing goes right. The entire day spirals out of your control and there is nothing you can do to stop it. The anxiety is closing in on you, and all your stress management skills have flown out the window. All you can do is look forward to bedtime, when the horrid day will be over.

OK, so you had one. What to do the next time one of these bad days comes around? How can we rebound? How can we learn from this? Here are six simple steps to fix a really bad day. Try these and watch your day turnaround.

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    1. Breathe

    The first thing to do is to get back to as calm a state as you possibly can. Spend a few minutes in meditation once you are ready.

    Concentrate on breath alone, feel the tension slowly melt from your body. Feel the weight lift off of you. Let the thoughts come and let them go. Once we are not operating in the purely negative space, we can take some proactive steps to rebound. We can view the day’s events with more objectivity once we are not deep within the emotions it spurred within us.

    2. Know in your heart it’s just a bad day, not a bad life

    Just because you had one horrible day, it doesn’t mean your entire life is all wrong.

    Ask yourself, how often am I having these types of days? When was the last one and what triggered that day? Am I starting to question major life choices such as my job or my relationship? Or was this quite simply, and most likely, just one very bad day?

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    Most of us can truly know in our hearts this is simply just one bad day. Our life is much more than just this one day. The joyful days will be intermixed with painful ones. We know this logically, but it feels different to live it out loud. Give yourself a break for going negative in response.

    3. Take personal responsibility

    What role did you play in getting yourself to this point? Usually when we react with irritation, anger or bitterness, it’s because we’ve allowed ourselves to be pushed beyond our boundaries. We’ve given up on time for self-care and self-love. We’ve said “yes” when we really meant “no”.

    This choice to cut ourselves short puts us on edge, and at a disadvantage for our ability to handle these types of days. Take a hard look at some choices you’ve made recently that made you more prone to react instead of accept. Take steps to protect and preserve your whole health and soul health to be in the best position possible to face what life will throw your way.

    4. Communicate with compassion

    What could have been done differently by others to avoid this situation? Did someone dump on you at work with short notice on a deadline? Did your partner not follow through on a promise? Who in your life played a role in the bad day? Can something be done differently to reduce the negative impact on you?

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    We can’t control the choices of others, but we can and should set our own boundaries. If there was a trust or responsibility violated by the boundary, that needs to be communicated. Perhaps even re-communicated. Open and honest, yet compassionate communication, is needed. How can you let this person know you would prefer this situation to be handled differently in the future?

    Have that difficult conversation. You are worth it. And guess what? So are they.

    You can’t expect different for the future unless you do different now. No one else feels how you feel, and this person may not even be aware of the wake they just created in your life. Gently and with love give them the information to be able to choose better next time.

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      5. Pick out the bright spots

      Even on the worst of days there are some bright spots. Go back over the day. What brought you even the tiniest glimmer of joy? A call from a friend? A smile from a stranger?

      I had one of these days recently, where everything went wrong. I was disappointed in others, and mostly in myself for how I let the events get to me. But at the end of that night, driving home late, my teenage son reached out to hold my hand in the car and smiled at me. Joy. Love. Heart melts. Bright spot.

      You have them even on the worst of days. Look for them and embrace them with gratitude in your heart.

      6. Let it go

      Leave yesterday in yesterday. You did the best you could in the moment, and so did others. It happened. Get up the next day with joy and gratitude in your heart that you get yet another chance at a joy-filled day. Yesterday does not need to affect today unless you allow it.

      Learn and adjust from the lessons you explored above. Apply the lessons and move on. And the next time you have another very bad day….which we all will….REPEAT the above!

      Before you know it, you may even be able to stop the next one midstream from taking over an entire day of your life.

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      Last Updated on December 2, 2018

      7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

      7 Public Speaking Techniques To Help Connect With Your Audience

      When giving a presentation or speech, you have to engage your audience effectively in order to truly get your point across. Unlike a written editorial or newsletter, your speech is fleeting; once you’ve said everything you set out to say, you don’t get a second chance to have your voice heard in that specific arena.

      You need to make sure your audience hangs on to every word you say, from your introduction to your wrap-up. You can do so by:

      1. Connecting them with each other

      Picture your typical rock concert. What’s the first thing the singer says to the crowd after jumping out on stage? “Hello (insert city name here)!” Just acknowledging that he’s coherent enough to know where he is is enough for the audience to go wild and get into the show.

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      It makes each individual feel as if they’re a part of something bigger. The same goes for any public speaking event. When an audience hears, “You’re all here because you care deeply about wildlife preservation,” it gives them a sense that they’re not just there to listen, but they’re there to connect with the like-minded people all around them.

      2. Connect with their emotions

      Speakers always try to get their audience emotionally involved in whatever topic they’re discussing. There are a variety of ways in which to do this, such as using statistics, stories, pictures or videos that really show the importance of the topic at hand.

      For example, showing pictures of the aftermath of an accident related to drunk driving will certainly send a specific message to an audience of teenagers and young adults. While doing so might be emotionally nerve-racking to the crowd, it may be necessary to get your point across and engage them fully.

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      3. Keep going back to the beginning

      Revisit your theme throughout your presentation. Although you should give your audience the credit they deserve and know that they can follow along, linking back to your initial thesis can act as a subconscious reminder of why what you’re currently telling them is important.

      On the other hand, if you simply mention your theme or the point of your speech at the beginning and never mention it again, it gives your audience the impression that it’s not really that important.

      4. Link to your audience’s motivation

      After you’ve acknowledged your audience’s common interests in being present, discuss their motivation for being there. Be specific. Using the previous example, if your audience clearly cares about wildlife preservation, discuss what can be done to help save endangered species’ from extinction.

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      Don’t just give them cold, hard facts; use the facts to make a point that they can use to better themselves or the world in some way.

      5. Entertain them

      While not all speeches or presentations are meant to be entertaining in a comedic way, audiences will become thoroughly engaged in anecdotes that relate to the overall theme of the speech. We discussed appealing to emotions, and that’s exactly what a speaker sets out to do when he tells a story from his past or that of a well-known historical figure.

      Speakers usually tell more than one story in order to show that the first one they told isn’t simply an anomaly, and that whatever outcome they’re attempting to prove will consistently reoccur, given certain circumstances.

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      6. Appeal to loyalty

      Just like the musician mentioning the town he’s playing in will get the audience ready to rock, speakers need to appeal to their audience’s loyalty to their country, company, product or cause. Show them how important it is that they’re present and listening to your speech by making your words hit home to each individual.

      In doing so, the members of your audience will feel as if you’re speaking directly to them while you’re addressing the entire crowd.

      7. Tell them the benefits of the presentation

      Early on in your presentation, you should tell your audience exactly what they’ll learn, and exactly how they’ll learn it. Don’t expect them to listen if they don’t have clear-cut information to listen for. On the other hand, if they know what to listen for, they’ll be more apt to stay engaged throughout your entire presentation so they don’t miss anything.

      Featured photo credit: Flickr via farm4.staticflickr.com

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