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Last Updated on November 5, 2019

How to Strive for Continuous Improvement and Growth

How to Strive for Continuous Improvement and Growth

Take a second to think about how your life is right now. Are you moving towards the goals you truly want to achieve? Or, has your progress halted?

I know that the majority of you would agree that it’s incredibly frustrating to feel as though our lives have become stagnant. More and more often, people are seeking opportunities which not only align with their values and beliefs but also provide these chances to develop and grow.

This is why the topic of continuous improvement has become so hotly discussed in recent years. People are looking into how they can efficiently and productively facilitate their continued growth and self-improvement.

This process of learning how to incorporate continuous improvement and development into our life allows us to build motivation and progress towards the goals we truly want to achieve in life.

Is this something that you’re interested in?

The good news is that, I’m going to outline why continuous improvement is important and how you can strive for it in your life to in order to achieve YOUR unique goals.

What is Continuous Improvement?

Continuous improvement is based on the idea that even when things are good, they could be better. Continually improving helps us to deliver on our goals and better meet the needs of our daily life. For example, finding ways to become either more productive or remove inefficiency from your life could both be outcomes of your efforts to improve continually.

Basically, continuous improvements help us to ensure that we’re functioning as efficiently, effectively, and accurately as possible.

There are many different methods through which we can pursue continuous improvement, such as through using the Deming Cycle.[1] This plan-do-check-act cycle involves first planning for the change, implementing the change, monitoring to see if that change makes a difference, and then acting on a larger scale if the change was successful.

You could also attain continuous improvement through self-evaluation.[2]

Despite the variety of continuous improvement methods, they can usually be segregated into either the incremental improvement category or the breakthrough improvement category.

Incremental vs Breakthrough Improvements

It is possible to achieve continuous improvement using only one of these two methods. However, the best practices tend to combine the two.

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Incremental Continuous Improvement

Incremental continuous improvements involve making small tweaks to a system as problems and challenges are found. Through this process, we are able to make small changes and corrections without having to review the entire process.

For example, imagine that you’re tasked with editing and proofreading a website for the organization you work for every week. As you work through the webpages, each you notice one or two broken links and you update them.

This would be an example of incremental continuous improvement. You are making small changes to the website that help it function at peak efficiency without having to review the entire system as a whole.

Breakthrough Continuous Improvement

Breakthrough continuous improvements contrast incremental ones. Breakthrough improvements involve making large changes to a system or process and usually involves a large-scale review.

The time and effort invested in breakthrough continuous improvements are larger than incremental improvements, but the results typically generate larger revisions and bring about larger changes more quickly.

Let’s return to the webpage example. Imagine that the organization you’re working for has decided to use a new operating system and a new theme for the webpage which significantly alters the design, formatting, and functionality. Now a much larger update is needed than correcting a few links to keep the webpage working efficiently.

Yes, you’ll have to invest more upfront to make these changes, but the results will likely yield a significantly updated and more modern webpage.

Benefits of Continuous Improvements

The benefits of making continuous improvements are clear. These practices help you to constantly be better yourself, your team, your organization, etc.[3]

Remember, nothing is every perfect and there is always going to be room to tweak and make improvements. Small incremental charges or large breakthrough changes can both bring about continuous improvement.

Are your daily routines holding you back in some way? Maybe it’s time to add/subtract a few things and make some small incremental changes to better your life. Or, it could be time to completely redesign your lifestyle to attempt to skyrocket your productivity immediately.

This isn’t a complicated concept or even a difficult one to implement once you understand it. But learning about continuous improvement methods such as the PDCA cycle, selecting one which works best for you, and implementing it in your life means that there’s practically nothing you won’t benefit from.

So now that you understand what continuous improvement is and how it can potentially benefit your life, it’s time to discuss how you go about incorporating these continuous improvement methods into your daily routine.

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How to Establish Continuous Improvement

Though you could try to tackle continuous improvement without a clear process, you will likely be much more successful if you set a plan to follow. The method I’ll outline today is one that we’ve already briefly mentioned, the PDCA cycle.

Though this model is often used within companies and organizations, it can also be applied to each unique individual.

The steps of the PDCA cycle include:[4]

  • Planning: Identifying and preparing for the change.
  • Doing: Implementing the change and attempt to improve the process.
  • Checking: Monitoring the results and outcomes of the change.
  • Acting: Implementing the change on a larger scale and applying it to other areas of your life as applicable.

The best way to utilize the PDCA when you’re starting out is by making small incremental changes rather than large breakthrough ones.

Smaller changes are easier to manage and you can simply make these changes as problems arise in your life on the fly. No need to consult anyone or seek guidance as you might need to for much larger breakthrough improvements.

Planning Phase: Clearly Define the Problem and Target Solution

Clearly Define the Problem

As problems arise, your first step in this continuous improvement process is to clearly identify the problem. If you don’t define the problem clearly your solution will lack both accuracy and effectiveness.

Ask yourself questions such as:

  • What is the problem here?
  • Who or what is the problem impacting and how is it having this impacts?
  • When does the problem commonly occur?
  • Why has this become an issue now?
  • What are the consequences of this problem?
  • What would the ideal result of overcoming this problem?

Your answers to these questions should help you clearly define the problem in question. Once you’ve got a clear understanding of what the problem is, what its impacts are, and how it’s occurring, it’s time to move on to the next step.

Establish a Potential Solution

Now that you understand the problem, you need to brainstorm some potential solutions and decide which you believe is the best.

Now, the solutions that you come up with will be unique to the problem in question. For example, imagine that you’re wasting 30 minutes each morning in bed as you scroll through social media on your mobile phone. There are many potential solutions to this problem.

You may decide that you should leave your phone on the other side of the room. You might decide to leave your phone outside of your bedroom each night. Or, you could simply lock yourself out of social media for the morning.

All of these are potential solutions. The main criteria for an effective solution should be that it helps you to overcome, correct, and prevent the consequences of the problem from occurring in the future.

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Your job is to now decide which of your brainstormed solution meets these criteria best. Once you’ve done that, you can move on to the next step of this continuous improvement cycle.

Doing Phase: Test Your Change

Now that you’ve established a potential solution that you feel best addresses the problem, it’s time to implement it. If you want to achieve continuous improvement, obviously you need to take action!

To do this, you need to set up a small trial. If we use the social media example above, a potential trial could be to test your solution for a week.

The purpose of the trial is to ensure that you track this issue/problem closely for the designated time-frame. This will ensure that you’re effectively addressing the problem and not shaking your life up a bit and then forgetting about it.

Additionally, through monitoring, you can make minor tweaks to your solution throughout the trial period if there are issues with it. This will help prevent you from creating more issues than you are solving.

Once the trial phase is over and your small-scale test is complete, you can move onto the next step!

Checking Phase: Review the Trial

Now that you’ve completed your trial phase and have the results you know whether your solution worked or whether it needs more work.

If your solution worked flawlessly, that is awesome! However, many times you’re going to find that your solution will require tweaking as additional issues you hadn’t predicted make themselves apparent.

It’s just the reality of continuous improvement that not every solution you implement will be a winner. But don’t worry, failure is just a stepping stone.

Let’s take a look at this in action by returning to the social media example outlined above.

Imagine that you’ve selected the solution to place your mobile phone outside of your bedroom. You believe this will force you to get up each morning and start your day before checking your phone. Now you’re going to run the trial for a week.

Initially, the trial went well. However, after the first few days, you noticed that you ended up just grabbing your phone from outside of your room and sitting on the couch to check social media.

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This causes you to tweak your solution by adding an app on your phone to lock yourself out of social media accounts for the first few hours of each day. Now you return to the trial phase and complete the process.

Acting Phase: Implement and Apply the Solution

Congrats! You’ve identified a problem in your life, implemented a solution, and tweaked it to correct for any unforeseen issues.

Now it’s time to implement that solution for the long-term to make a real significant change in your life. How you decide is best to do this will depend on the situation.

I find that the best ways to do this are through looking to other areas of your life where this solution could be applied. This helps to engrain it into your lifestyle.

For example, maybe you also struggle with wasting time before you go to sleep on social media. If this is a habit you want to eliminate, you can now transfer the solution you just tested to this problem as well.

Now that you’ve successfully addressed the initial issue with a solution that you’ve fully integrated into your life, it’s time to start the cycle over.

After all, this process of continuous improvement is only continuous if you commit to continually improving different aspects of your life.

After you’ve got some experience with the PDCA cycle, you’ll find each subsequent improvement slightly easier to implement.

Be warned though, the process can be addicting. Once you start, you might find that you don’t want to stop!

Final Thoughts

Continuous improvement is one of the ways through which you can continually work to better your life. One day you’ll be able to look back at this process you underwent and view it as its own reward.

Hopefully, this article motivates you to get working to better your life, even if it’s already pretty good. There’s always room for improvement.

If you commit to a process of continuous improvement such as the PDCA cycle, hopefully, you’ll minimize the time you spend looking back on your life and wishing that you had done more.

I hope this article motivates, inspires, and provides you with the knowledge necessary to push yourself to reach your full potential as you make small continuous improvements each and every day.

More About Continuous Improvement

Featured photo credit: ROOM via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] ISIXSIGMA: Deming Cycle, PDCA
[2] Educational Administration Quarterly: Program Self-Evaluation for Continuous Improvement
[3] The Joint Commission Journal on Quality Improvement: Continuous Self-Improvement: Systems Thinking in a Personal Context
[4] Encyclopedia of Quality and the Service Economy 2015: Plan, Do, Check, Act (PDCA) Cycle

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Mark Lynch

Featured Life-Balance, & Personal Development Author

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Last Updated on March 31, 2020

How to Know Which Types of Learning Styles Work for You?

How to Know Which Types of Learning Styles Work for You?

One of the biggest realizations I had as a kid is that teaching in school could be hit or miss for students. We all have our own different types of learning styles. Even when I was in study groups, we all had our own ways of uncovering solutions to questions.

It wasn’t only until later in my life did I realize how important it is to know your own learning style. As soon as you know how you learn and the best way to learn, you can better retain information. This information could be crucial to your job, future promotions, and overall excelling in life.

Best of all about this information is that, it’s not hard to figure out what works best for you. There are broad categories of learning styles, so it’s a matter of finding which one we gravitate towards most.

What Are the Types of Learning Styles?

Before we get into the types of learning styles, there’s one thing to know:

We all learn through repetition.

No matter how old you are, studies show that repetition allows us to retain and learn new information.[1] The big question now is what kind of repetition is needed. After all, we all learn and process information differently.

This is where the types of learning styles come in. There are eight in total and there is one or two that we prefer over others. This is important because when reading these learning styles, you’ll feel like you’d prefer a mixture of these styles.

That’s because we do prefer a combination. Though there will be one style that will be more predominate over the others. The key is finding which one it is.

Visual Learning

A visual learner (also known as the spatial learner) excels at deciphering anything visual – typically maps and graphs.

If you are this type of learner, you likely excelled at geometry in math class but struggled with arithmetic and numbers. To this day, you might also struggle with reading and writing to a degree.

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While visual learners are described as “late bloomers,” they are highly imaginative. They also process what they see much faster than what they hear.

Verbal Learning

Verbal learning, on the other hand, is learning through what’s spoken. Verbal learners excel in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Because of that, they are likely the ones to find thrills in tongue twists, word games, and puns.

They also thoroughly enjoy drama, writing, and speech classes. But give them maps, or challenge them to think outside of the box and they’ll struggle a bit.

Logical Learning

Not to be confused with visual learners, these learners are good at math and logic puzzles. Anything involving numbers or other abstract visual information is where they excel.

They can also analyze cause and effect relationships quite well. Part of that is due to their thinking process being linear.

Another big difference is their need to quantify everything. These people love grouping information, creating specific lists, agendas or itineraries.

They also have a love for strategy games and making calculations in their heads.

Auditory Learning

Similar to verbal learning, this type of learning style focuses on sounds on a deeper level. These people think chronologically and excel more in the step-by-step methods. These are likely the people who will watch Youtube videos to learn or do something the most.

These learners also have a great memory of conversations and love debates and discussions. Chances are likely these people excel at anything oral.

Also as the name suggests, these individuals have great musical talents. They can decern notes, instruments, rhythms and tones. That being said, they will have a tough time interpreting body language, expressions and gestures. This also applies to charts, maps and graphs.

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Social Learning

Otherwise known as the interpersonal learner, their skills are really unique. They don’t particularly excel in classrooms but rather through talking to other people.

These are the people who are excited for group conversations or group projects. Mainly because they are gifted with coming up with ideas and discussing them.

They also have a good understanding of people’s emotions, facial expressions, and relationship dynamics. They are also likely the first people to point out the root causes of communication issues.

Intrapersonal Learning

The reverse of interpersonal learning, these people prefer learning alone. These are the people who love self-study and working alone. Typically, intrapersonal learners are deeply in tune with themselves meaning they know who they are, their feelings, and their own capabilities.

This type of learning style means you love learning something on your own and typically every day. You also have innate skills in managing yourself and indulging in self-reflection.

Physical Learning

Also known as kinesthetic learning, these people love doing things with their hands. These are people who loved pottery or shop class. If you’re a physical learner, you’ll find you have a huge preference in using your body in order to learn.

This means not just pottery or shop class you enjoyed. You may also have loved sports or any other art medium like painting or woodwork. Anything that involved you learning through physical manipulation you enjoyed and excelled at.

Though this doesn’t just apply to direct physical activities. A physical learner may also find that they learn well when both reading on any subject and pacing or bouncing your leg at the same time.

Naturalistic Learning

The final learning style is naturalistic. These are people who process information through patterns in nature. They also apply scientific reasoning in order to understand living creatures.

Not many people may be connected to this one out of the types of learning styles primarily because of those facts. Furthermore, those who excel in this learning end up being farmers, naturalists or scientists.

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These are the people who love everything with nature. They appreciate plants, animals, and rural settings deeply compared to others.

How to Know Which One(s) Suit You Better?

So now that you have an idea of all the types of learning styles we have another question:

Which one(s) are best for you?

As a reminder, all of us learn through a combination of these learning styles. This makes pinpointing these styles difficult since our learning is likely a fusion of two or more of those styles.

Fortunately, there are all kinds of methods to narrow down which learner you are. Let’s explore the most popular one: the VARK model.

VARK Model

Developed by Neil Fleming and David Baume, the VARK model is basically a conversation starter for teachers and learners.[2] It takes the eight types of learning styles above and condenses them into four categories:

  • Visual – those who learn from sight.
  • Auditory – those who learn from hearing.
  • Reading/writing – those who learn from reading and writing.
  • Kinesthetic – those who learn from doing and moving.

As you can probably tell, VARK comes from the first letter of each style.

But why use this particular model?

This model was created not only for discussion purposes but for learners to know a few key things — namely understanding how they learn.

Because our school system is focusing on a one-size-fits-all model, there are many of us who struggle learning in school. While we may no longer go to school, these behaviors persisted into our adult lives regardless. While we aren’t learning about algebra or science, we may be learning new things about our job or industry. Knowing how to best retain that information for the future helps in so many ways.

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As such, it can be frustrating when we’re in a classroom setting and aren’t understanding anything. That or maybe we’re listening to a speech or reading a book and have no clue what’s going on.

This is where VARK comes back in. To quote Fleming and Baume:

“VARK above all is designed to be a starting place for a conversation among teachers and learners about learning. It can also be a catalyst for staff development- thinking about strategies for teaching different groups can lead to more, and appropriate, variety of learning and teaching.”

Getting into the specifics, this is what’s known as metacognition.[3] It helps you to understand how you learn and who you are. Think of it as a higher order of thinking that takes control over how you learn. It’s impossible to not use this while learning.

But because of that metacognition, we can pinpoint the different types of learning styles that we use. More importantly, what style we prefer over others.

Ask These Questions

One other method that I’ll mention is the research that’s done at the University of Waterloo.[4] If you don’t want to be using a lot of brainpower to pinpoint, consider this method.

The idea with this method is to answer a few questions. Since our learning is a combination of styles, you’ll find yourself leaning to one side over the other with these questions:

  • The active/reflective scale: How do you prefer to process information?
  • The sensing/intuitive scale: How do you prefer to take in information?
  • The visual/verbal scale: How do you prefer information to be presented?
  • The sequential/global scale: How do you prefer to organize information?

This can narrow down how you learn and provide some other practical tips for enhancing your learning experience.

Final Thoughts

Even though we have a preferred style of learning and knowing what that is is beneficial, learning isn’t about restriction. Our learning style shouldn’t be the sole learning style we rely on all the time.

Our brain is made of various parts and whatever style we learn activates certain parts of the brain. Because of this fact, it would be wise to consider other methods of learning and to give them a try.

Each method I mentioned has its merits and there’s not one dominate or superior method. What method we like is entirely up to our preferences. So be flexible with those preferences and uncover what style works best for you.

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Featured photo credit: Anna Earl via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] BrainScape: Repetition is the mother of all learning
[2] Neil Fleming and David Baume: VARKing Up the Right Tree
[3] ERIC: Metacognition: An Overview
[4] University of Waterloo: Understanding Your Learning Style

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