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Last Updated on April 19, 2021

How to Measure a Goal (With Examples of Measurable Goals)

How to Measure a Goal (With Examples of Measurable Goals)

Everyone sets goals, whether they are measurable goals like completing a project, personal aspirations like traveling the world, or even workplace targets. Unfortunately, setting a goal isn’t enough to get you over the line. This is why only eight percent of people achieve their goals.[1]

So, how do the high achievers do it?

By setting measurable goals, keeping track of them, and progressing towards these goals each day.

To help you out, I’ve put together a simple guide on measuring goals. I’ll show you a SMART framework you can use to create measurable goals, and how you can track your goals’ progress.

What Are SMART Goals?

In order to easily measure a goal, you should start with SMART goal setting. SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, and Time-Bound. They help set clear intentions, so you can continue staying on course with long term goals.

When you’re writing measurable goals, you need to work through each of the terms in the acronym to ensure it’s realistic and achievable.

It’ll help you set specific and challenging goals that eliminate vagueness and guesswork. It’ll also have a clear deadline so you know when you need to complete it by[2].

SMART Goals: Definition and Examples | Indeed.com

    Here’s what SMART stand for:

    Specific

    Your goals need to be specific. Without specificity, your goal will feel much harder to complete and stick to.

    It should also have a specific outcome. Without the outcome, it will be hard to focus and stay on task with your goals.

    Two researchers, Edwin Locke and Gary Latham, found that when people set specific yet challenging goals, it led to increased performance 90 percent of the time.[3]

    Here’s an example of a specific goal: Increase sales by 10% in 90 days. 

    Measurable

    You need to be able to measure these goals.

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    Examining a key metric and quantifying your goals will help track your progress. It will also identify the mark at which you’ve completed your task.

    Measurable can mean many different things, but generally speaking, you want to be able to objectively measure success with a goal.

    Whether it’s via analytical data, performance measures, or direct revenue, ensure your goal is quantifiable.

    Achievable

    Given the time and resources at your disposal, is it realistically possible to achieve the overall goal you’ve laid out?

    For example, if your goal is to increase your company’s Facebook followers from 10,000 to 20,000, putting a limit of one month will make this goal difficult to achieve. However, with a time-frame of six months, the goal becomes much more realistic.

    You’ll also need to look into if you have staff members who are able to devote time to social media management. If not, this could be a limiting factor that makes the goal less achievable.

    Relevant

    Why do you want to reach this goal? Is it important for you or your organization?

    Once you identify the key benefit, add that into your goal so it helps your team members understand the importance of the goal and how it contributes to the bigger picture.

    Timely

    Measurable goals should include a deadline so that there is an understanding of when and how things need to progress. Without a target date, the goal may suffer from poor time management and never come to fruition.

    The time frame will also create a sense of urgency. It functions as a healthy tension that will springboard you and your team to action.

    If you want to set yourself a smart goal and achieve it effectively, get the free guide The Dreamers’ Guide for Taking Action and Making Goals Happen. In the guide, you will learn how to reach your gaol by planning your actions. Grab your free guide here.

    Examples of Measurable Goals

    Now that we know what a SMART goal is, it’s time to help you make your own measurable goals and objectives.

    Specific

    A specific goal should identify:

    • What’s the project or task at hand?
    • Who’s responsible for the task? If you’re breaking the task down, who is responsible for each section?
    • What steps do you need to complete to reach your goal?

    Here’s a bad example:

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    I want to have a better job.

    This example is poor because it’s not specific enough. Sure, it’s specific to your work, but it doesn’t explain whether you want a promotion, a raise, a career change, etc.

    What about your current job do you want to improve? Do you want to change companies, or are you striving for more work-life balance?

    Let’s transform this into a good example.

    I want to find a new role at a Fortune 500 company that improves my current salary and work-life balance.

    If you’re not too sure what the specific outcome should be, you can use mind maps to brainstorm all the possible options.

    Measurable

    Goals need to be measurable in a way where you can present tangible, concrete evidence. You should be able to identify what you will experience when you reach that goal.

    Ideally, you should go for a metric or quantity, as quantifying goals makes it easier to track.

    Here’s a bad example:

    I will improve the quality of my work.

    Here’s a good example:

    I will improve the number of projects I complete on a month basis by a factor of 2. 

    This goal is now easily measured. If you’ve completed 2 more projects this month than last month, you have officially improved the quality of your work, as well as your productivity.

    If you’re having difficulty measuring your goals, you can use a goal tracking app. They’re a great way to measure your progress, especially if they are time-based.

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    Here are five methods you can use to measure your progress towards the goal:

    1. Keep a record: Have you recorded all your actions in a journal or Excel sheet?
    2. Assess your numbers/evidence: Are you breaking your commitments?
    3. Create a checklist: Can you simplify your tasks?
    4. Stay on course: Are you moving forward with your plan smoothly?
    5. Rate your progress: Where can you improve?

    Achievable

    When it comes to being able to achieve your measurable goals, you should stick to Pareto’s principle. This is the famous 80/20 rule.

    Using all of your energy on each piece of the puzzle may not be the best tactic. Pick things that give you the most results. Then, work on the next objective or goal once you’ve completed your first ones.

    Here’s a bad example:

    To improve my work-life balance, I will reduce the time I spend at work.

    This may be possible, but since you haven’t specified which parts of your work you will spend less time on, this may not ultimately be achievable.

    Here’s a good example:

    To improve my work-life balance, I will delegate parts of projects to other team members. 

    If you know you have team members willing to step in and help, this is definitely achievable and should win you some more time at home.

    Relevant

    It’s always important to examine your goal to ensure it’s relevant and realistic to what you’re doing in your life or business.

    Here’s a bad example:

    I want to be promoted to CMO because I need more responsibility.

    In this case, it’ll be unlikely for you to receive a promotion if the purpose and reason behind your goals are not strong.

    Here’s a good example:

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    I want to be promoted to CMO because I enjoy digital marketing. I’m currently excelling in X, Y, and Z digital marketing practices, and I believe that via a promotion I can further grow the business via X, Y and Z.

    The why will help you push through in moments when you just want to throw in the towel, and also provide more motivation for your goals.

    Timely

    Having a due date helps your team set micro goals and milestones towards measurable goals. That way, you can plan the workload throughout your days, weeks, and months to ensure that your team won’t be racing against the clock.

    Let’s start with a bad example:

    I will grow our marketing team in order to expand our digital presence.

    This is a great idea, but when will all of this happen?

    Let’s turn this into a great example, instead:

    Within the next month I will increase marketing revenue by XX%. Then, within three months I will expand the digital team, hire two new employees, and scale it. 

    The Bottom Line

    If you want to create measurable goals, be SMART about it. Start with a specific outcome in mind; make sure it’s measurable, achievable, relevant, and timely to your existing schedule.

    While 92 percent of people fail to reach their goals, you can be the exception. Reach your goals by setting targets and objectives alongside your team and discover just how successful you can be.

    Need extra help? The Make It Happen Handbook is an effective tool to guide you through the challenging journey towards reaching your goal. Check out the handbook now!

    More on Measurable Goals

    Featured photo credit: Green Chameleon via unsplash.com

    Reference

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    Dmitry Dragilev

    Single-handedly grew a startup from zero to 40 million page views, Dmitry is a role model for aspiring entrepreneurs.

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    Last Updated on April 19, 2021

    How to Find Your Passion and Live a More Fulfilling Life

    How to Find Your Passion and Live a More Fulfilling Life

    If you could do one thing to transform your life, I would highly recommend it be to find something you’re passionate about, and do it for a living. Learning how to find your passion may not be as easy as it sounds, but it’s well worth the effort.

    If you dread going to your job, find yourself constantly lacking motivation, or find what you’re doing dull and repetitive, you need to start looking for a new job.

    Staying in your current job will not only continue to leave you feeling stuck and make you unhappy, but you are not realizing your full potential in life.

    Imagine this instead:

    You get up early, jumping out of bed, excited to go to work. You might put in more hours than the average person, but it doesn’t seem difficult to you, because your work hours just zoom right by.

    You are often in that state of mind, often referred to as “flow,” where you can lose track of the world and time, losing yourself in the task at hand. Work is not work as many people refer to it, but something that is fun and interesting and exciting. It’s not a “job” but a passion that leads to a fulfilling life.

    If you’ve got a job you dislike, or even hate, this will sound like a pipe dream to you. And if you never put in the effort to find what you’re passionate about, such a thing will never be possible.

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    However, if you dare to ask “how do I find my passion,” imagine the possibilities, and actually search for what you love, it is not only a possibility, but a probability.

    How do you go about learning how to find your passion in life? Here are some suggestions:

    1. Is There Something You Already Love Doing?

    Do you have a hobby or something you loved doing as a child, but never considered it as a possibility for a job?

    Whether it’s reading comic books, collecting something, or creating or building, there is probably a way you could do it for a living. Open a comic book shop, or create a comic book site online.

    If there’s already something you love doing, you’re ahead of the game. Now you just need to research the possibilities of making money from it.

    2. Find out What You Spend Hours Reading About

    For myself, when I get passionate about something, I’ll read about it for hours on end. I’ll buy books and magazines. I’ll spend days on the Internet finding out more.

    There may be a few possibilities here for you, and all of them are possible career paths. Don’t close your mind to these topics. Look into them until you feel your heart is content, and this will help you get started as you learn how to find your passion.

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    3. Brainstorm

    If nothing comes to mind right away as you’re asking how to find my passion, get out a sheet of paper and start writing down ideas[1]. This doesn’t need to be an organized list. It can simply be a paper full of random notes or even doodles. All of this will eventually come in handy later.

    Look around your house, on your computer, or on your bookshelf for inspiration, and write down whatever comes to mind. There are no bad ideas at this stage.

    4. Ask Around

    There are likely people you admire in life, and there are things about them that you would like to replicate in yourself. Go to them if possible, and pick their brain. See how they landed where they currently are and whether they feel they’ve discovered their passion.

    The more possibilities you find, the more likely your chances of learning how to find your passion in the long run. This may mean that you spend time talking to friends and family, coworkers, or even acquaintances in your free time.

    5. Don’t Quit Your Job Just Yet

    If you find your calling, your passion, don’t just turn in your resignation tomorrow. It’s best to stay in your job while you’re researching the possibilities.

    If you can do your passion as a side job and build up the income for a few months or a year, that’s even better. It gives you a chance to build up some savings (and if you’re going into business for yourself, you’ll need that cash reserve), while practicing the skills you need.

    6. Give It a Try First

    It’s best to actually test your new idea before jumping into it as a career as you’re wondering how to find your passion. Do it as a hobby or side job at first, so that you can see if it’s really your true calling.

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    You may be passionate about it for a few days, but where the rubber meets the road is whether you’re passionate about it for at least a few months.

    If you pass this test, you have probably found it.

    7. Do as Much Research as Possible

    Know as much about your passion as possible. If this has been a passion for a while, you may have already been doing this. At any rate, do even more research. Read every website possible on the topic, and buy the best books available.

    Find other people, either in your area or on the Internet, who do what you want to do for a living, and quiz them about the profession.

    How much do they make, and what training and education did they need? What skills are necessary, and how did they get their start? What recommendations do they have?

    Often, you’ll find that people are more than willing to give advice.

    8. Practice, and Practice, and Practice Some More

    If you’re getting close to learning how to find your passion, don’t go into it with amateur skill level. If you want to make money—to be a professional—you need to have professional skills.

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    Get very good at your future career, and you will make money at it. Practice for hours on end and learn how to focus; if it’s something you love, the practice should be something you want to do.

    9. Never Quit Trying

    It’s possible that you won’t be able to find your passion at first. However, if you give up after a few days, you’re sure to fail. Keep trying, for months on end if necessary, and you’ll find it eventually.

    Perhaps you thought you found your passion but discovered several months on that it wasn’t for you. Start over again and find a new passion. There may be more than one passion in your lifetime, so explore all the possibilities.

    Have you found your passion but haven’t been successful making a living at it? Keep trying, and try again until you succeed. Success doesn’t come easy, so giving up early is a sure way to fail.

    If you need a little help, the Make It Happen Handbook can provide you with a solid action plan to help you turn your passion in your career. Check out the handbook and start to live your passion!

    The Bottom Line

    Don’t forget that all of this will be a lot of work, but it will be the best investment you’ve ever made. Put in the time to learn how to find your passion, and you will find that your days are more fulfilling and produce more happiness and well-being in the long-term.

    More About Finding Passion

    Featured photo credit: Dewet Willemse via unsplash.com

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