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Last Updated on May 12, 2021

How to Write a Good SMART Goal Statement for Success

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How to Write a Good SMART Goal Statement for Success

Goal setting used to be something only the elite successful few had knowledge of and utilized, but it is now becoming widely known as the smartest first step to achieving success. In spite of this, it’s quite surprising to find that many people don’t know how to write a good SMART goal statement. They don’t write them well or even understand why it’s so important.

SMART is a well-known acronym, which is mostly understood as Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-bound. However, there are also a number of simple secrets to this acronym that can really make a difference.[1]

When we effectively write a good SMART goal statement, it gives our mind direction, and we see more possibility. We become more focused, and because of this, we often achieve what we want a lot faster. We also save time and work more productively.

And here’s why:

There is a tiny part of our brain called the Reticular Activating System (RAS). It acts like the gatekeeper between our conscious and unconscious mind. It filters information and controls what we become consciously aware of in our everyday environment.[2]

The thing that most people are unaware of is that the RAS filters according to past and present experience, and it deletes anything that isn’t relevant to that.

This means if you don’t write a SMART goal statement with this in mind, you could miss essential cues that could help you achieve it. Your RAS will delete that information.

A SMART goal statement is a sentence or even paragraph written to the formula of the SMART acronym. This contains all the effective criteria you need to help you write a powerful goal. When you adjust this acronym slightly, it brings that formula to life.

Specific: It’s All in the Details

Specific means more than just precise objects like a house, car, or money, although this is important. True specificity is also in the micro details of the experience when writing a goal statement.

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It’s essential to take time to reflect on:

  • What you want to achieve
  • Who else will be involved
  • When and where it will be achieved
  • Why you want it

Including the sensory details of the experience is vital, such as what you will see, hear, feel, smell, or taste as you achieve it.

This makes your goal statement sensory specific, and because we experience everything through our five senses, it brings your goal to life. It manipulates your RAS, as it doesn’t know the difference between imagination and real experience. We respond almost automatically to this sensory information, which means we will make different decisions.[3]

As you write your goal this way, your RAS will start to provide you with opportunities. Many people call them coincidences, but it’s just that your blinders have come off, and you are more consciously aware.

When writing your goal statement with specific and sensory detail, you will begin to notice many more possibilities than ever before.

Measurable: The Necessary Requirements

This is anything with numbers in it, such as quantities, measurements, amounts, and dates.

If a goal statement isn’t measurable, then it becomes quite easy to veer off track in the long term. It’s like a football field with no goal post. The game would never end, and no one would know which direction to play.

When you make your goal measurable, it gives you a concrete criteria to aim for. This will increase your focus, making your decisions and actions much more defined.

This can sometimes be tricky with certain goals. For instance, it’s easy to write a measurable goal when aiming for an increase in income or a decrease in weight. Goals around things like relationships, friendships, or health require more thought.

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Think about how you will know the goal has been achieved and what measurements could be involved. For example, if you want to increase the fun in your relationship, you may be having a date night each week or doing something adventurous once a month. This makes your goal measurable.

As you write your goal statement with a measurement in mind, it will give you a clear vision of what you are aiming for. This is vital to reaching your target.

Achievable: Thinking in the Present

It will benefit you greatly when you write your goals as if they are happening right now. This is because it makes your goal statement a current experience.

If you write your goal statement as a future experience, then it will always be in the future. This is because your mind will delete indicators, which can help you achieve what you want.

When you write your goals in the present tense, your mind starts to think in a different way. Your goal becomes believable for your mind, and you will feel more confident in your ability to achieve it.

Writing your goal statement this way also changes the way your RAS is filtering information. You will notice things you used to be unaware of. This causes you to take actions you may not have taken before or go places you’ve never been.

You may even bump into someone who can give you precise information to help you achieve your goal. These are often referred to as “signs” that you are meant to be doing it. This really just means your goal statement made you more aware.

Instead of beginning your goal with “By 31 December 2019,” I encourage you to write it this way; “It is 31 December 2019 and I am (or) I have.” As you write your goal in the present tense, you will notice how real and exciting your achievement feels.

Realistic: Don’t Limit Yourself

It’s important that you don’t make your goal realistic according to what you have achieved in the past. This is one of the most common ways you could limit yourself.

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A great deal is possible, and it is only your own mind that gets in the way of achieving it.

We create things twice, first in our imagination and then in our physical reality. This means if we can see it in our minds eye, we can have or do it. It may just mean learning a new skill or building a key strength.

Realistic means assessing whether the goal is achievable in the time frame you have allowed. For example, if you want to become a competitive tennis player and you are a beginner, then it is unrealistic to expect to do this in one month. Within this time frame, you would possibly have joined a club and begun lessons.

When you set your goals, do a realistic check, and if your time frame is a bit out, just change it.

When you use this version of realistic, you will notice that your potential expands, and your goals move within reach.

Time-Bound: Create Motivation in Your Goal Statement

When you put a date to your goal, it gives your mind a deadline. And as you probably know with any deadline, it gets you off the starting line.

Whether you leave things until the last minute, or whether you action a goal gradually over a longer time frame, it has the same effect.

The thing is, your date must be specific because if it is too vague, it won’t motivate you as much.

Our unconscious mind always wants to protect us from the prospect of failure. One way we can do this is by not deciding on a firm deadline. If we don’t have a clear target date, then it’s easy to tell ourselves it’s not important. We might let ourselves off or get distracted with something else.

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Giving your deadline more definition, however, makes it urgent and something to be dealt with quickly. When you set the target date for your goal statement, make it very detailed with the day, month, and year. You can even add the time if you want to be really specific. For example “It is Tuesday 31 December 2019 at 3PM.”

Imagine how vivid this becomes in your mind’s eye when you do this and the incredible sense of achievement you will feel when you reach your goal. This is one of the best ways to steer clear of procrastination. You can further guard against this with Lifehack’s Fast-Track Class: No More Procrastination.

Final Thoughts

There was a much-quoted study, which was allegedly carried out in Yale University. The stories of this study have persisted since 1953. It showed that only 3% of those surveyed actually wrote goal statements. Findings claimed that the elusive minority achieved their goals more consistently, had more confidence, and earned more money than the other 97% who didn’t.

After further research, this study and its stories were eventually found to be a myth. But, the reason they’ve perpetuated for so long is because their fundamental assertions are believable. The principals have been the practice of the most elite and successful for many years, and in my personal and professional experience I have found this to be true.[4]

Whether the study happened or not, what I do know is this:

One of the main reasons many goals remain dreams is because the deeper meaning of SMART is not fully utilized.

Implementing these powerful principals in your SMART goal statements will dramatically increase your odds of consistently achieving high!

More About Goals Setting

Featured photo credit: NeONBRAND via unsplash.com

Reference

[1] Corporate Finance Institute: Smart Goal
[2] StatPearls: Neuroanatomy, Reticular Activating System
[3] Victoria State Government: The senses working together
[4] Forbes Books: The Science Behind Setting Goals (and Achieving Them)

More by this author

Deb Johnstone

Deb is a professional mindset speaker and a transformational life, business and career coach. Specialising in NLP and dynamic mindset.

How to Survive a Quarter Life Crisis (The Complete Guide) 14 Powerful Steps to Achieve Career Advancement 7 Essential Success Tips to Achieve What You Want in Life Signs You Need an Attitude Adjustment (And How to Do It) How to Write a Good SMART Goal Statement for Success

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Last Updated on January 14, 2022

7 Best Goal Planners To Get in 2022

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7 Best Goal Planners To Get in 2022

A few of the many obstacles to setting goals is that you either forget your goals entirely or you put them off for so long. One of the most effective tools in handling this problem is through having goal planners.

Goal planners are a way to put your goals to paper and allow you to focus on that goal. These are great tools to be implementing new habits and boosting your overall productivity.

With so many of these goal planners available, our editors picked out a small sample of some of the best goal planners that you can get to achieve what you want in 2022!

Best Goal Planners Criteria

Through our research, all the best goal planners that we picked out meet the following criteria:

  • Undated – A big issue with some planners is that they have days and years written in them. This is problematic especially when starting out goal setting. Undated versions allow you to start, stop, and take breaks without feeling like you’re wasting paper.
  • Science based – Either in their methods or in the activities these planners get you to do, these goal planners are smartly structured to help you get the most out of your day.
  • Simple, clean and organized – All of these planners are clean and organized to the point that these planners can serve as an extension of your brain. They’re able to easily organize jumbled thoughts and help you plot out your goals.

1. Full Life Planner

full-life-planner

    Lifehack’s Full Life Planner is a planner system built around the Full Life Framework. It’s a planner that helps you to organize every aspect of your life. The Framework has been going strong for 15 years and provides some of Lifehack’s best practices and proven success formulas.

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    Get your Full Life Planner here, or try the digital version here.

    2. Panda Planner

      The Panda Planner has been highly reviewed as another one of the best goal planners to get. On top of it providing sections for monthly, weekly, and daily planning, it offers free videos as well as e-books to show you all kinds of strategies to help in all kinds of aspects of your life.

      You can get the Panda Planner here.

      3. Law of Attraction Planner

        This is the planner for people that want to manifest something new or exciting in their lives. It helps you to set goals through prompts, to-do lists, and goal-setting tools to establish habits. On the manifestation front, it provides sections for you to show gratitude, allowing you to be thankful for what you do have and are working towards. The planner also comes with a video to help establish a 10-minute morning routine and various stickers to make your planner more unique.

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        Purchase the Law of Attraction Planner here.

        4. Little More Daily Organizer

          While it only has 328 undated pages, it offers a great focus on monthly and daily goal setting. It’s ideal if your goals and habits that you’re invested in and really want them to be sticking. How it’s able to do that is through its flexible design and also providing space for you to outline actions steps, reflect on processes, and prioritize multiple goals.

          Grab your Little More Daily Organizer here.

          5. Erin Condren Petite Planner

            Only 80 pages long, it’s efficient with its space as its packed with all kinds of features for setting goals and stick to your plans. You’re able to describe your goal, outline a “why”, and put together an action plan. The other page is a way for you to chunk large goals and put them into more manageable tasks. All around it’s a fantastic planner.

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            Try the Erin Condren Petite Planner here.

            6. The 100-Day Goal Journal

              If setting goals for a year seems daunting, another one of the best goal planners that’s short is the 100-day goal journal. It has monthly spreads, daily reflection pages where you’re able to practice gratitude and check overarching goals. It even has space for you to reflect on current challenges and offer solutions to your problems.

              Take a look at the 100-Day Goal Journal here.

              7. SELF Journal

              best-self

                The final of the best goal planners we have to offer is SELF journal. It offers daily gratitude acknowledgement, sections to track goals on a weekly basis and also has inspirational quotes to provide that extra push of motivation. It’s only got enough pages for 13 weeks, but it’s ideal if you set a lot of shorter-term goals and want those small habits to stick.

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                Check out the SELF Journal here.

                Final Thoughts

                All of our goals are achievable with the proper mindset and a system to support it. Planners have been able to precisely assist those who struggle with getting started and need help in organizing their thoughts and putting it to paper.

                For those who want to stick to habits, try out one of these planners to help you with that process.

                Featured photo credit: Alexa Williams via unsplash.com

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