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Last Updated on December 15, 2020

Does Sweating Burn Fat? Find out the Truth Here

Does Sweating Burn Fat? Find out the Truth Here

When I was training martial arts years ago, there was a guy training while wearing a huge insulated jacket in the gym. It was 25 degrees outside. He was trying to slim down for a fight he would have 3 months from then. He was sweating like a pig (speaking about the iron ore smelting,[1] of course). In the training session, you felt sweat from this guy dropping on your face. That guy honestly thought that losing sweat means losing fat.

Does sweating burn fat? I wish I would’ve had the necessary knowledge back then, because if so, I could have told him that it doesn’t work this way.

Why we sweat

We sweat to minimize body temperature. Our body tries to be on a constant 37°C body temperature with slight fluctuations during the day. At this temperature, the enzyme activities of your body work the best.

Once your body exceeds these comfortable 37°C, it activates your sweat glands. You start to lose water along with salts, sugar and tiny amounts of waste products. You have about 2 to 4 million sweat glands in your body that cool you down.

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The amount you sweat heavily depends on your genetics. The temperature and humidity level does influence your sweat rate, but so does your gender, age and fitness level.

You sweat more in heat and humidity, but that doesn’t mean you’re burning more calories or fat. It simply means your body has to release perspiration to bring your body temperature down. People with a higher amount of body fat tend to sweat a lot more because they have a greater amount of body mass to cool down.

Sweat and body fat

Fat gets released from fat cells to provide your body with energy. Your body breaks down the fat into its parts — fatty acids and glycerol — which are then metabolized.

Fat is quite hard to metabolize, but it’s possible. Read this article to see how I’ve lost my body fat or get in contact if you’re looking for a coach. The more energy you need, the more your body pulls from your fat cells. The bodily function that causes you to use fat for energy operates independently of the one that causes you to sweat.

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Purposefully exercising in a hot or humid environment doesn’t mean you’re working harder to burn more fat. You’re simply raising your body temperature to a point that prompts you to sweat more.

When I was younger, I also thought that sweating increases the rate of body fat that you burn. If you sweat more, it simply means that you’re working harder, am I right?

But we have to realize that sitting on a beach on a 100-degree day doesn’t require a lot of energy and doesn’t use notable amounts of fat. You sweat because your body is just in need of serious thermoregulation.

On the other hand, when you work hard in sub-zero temperatures such as jogging in winter, you still burn fat even if your body doesn’t sweat as much to cool you down.

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Weight loss or just water gone?

You may notice that after a shirt-drenching workout, the number on the scale has gone down. You haven’t dropped a few pounds of fat, but you have lost a fair amount of fluids. This is also why training with a jacket can make sense for a martial artist to lose weight short-term (to fit the right weight-class), but not months ahead of the competition.

But for normal people looking to get fit, you should replace that lost weight with water or a sports drink to avoid dehydration.

If you enter a workout dehydrated, you may not sweat at all. Your body increases in temperature but is unable to cool down efficiently again. This results in a decreased ability to perform. This is also why hydration is critical to reaching your performance goals.

Consume about half a litres until you begin a workout and at least 0.3 litres every 20 minutes during the workout session. In the end, you can drink 0.5 litres again (this might also help in muscle buildup).

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Pro Tip: Weigh yourself before and after the workout and then compare the two numbers. When the scale says you’ve lost weight, drink fluids immediately. At best 0.5 litres to make up for every kilogram that you’ve lost.

Conclusion

You’ve probably heard about “Sweat is fat crying”. While I know it’s just a saying to get people stay motivated, now you know that it’s not true.

Sweating more doesn’t mean losing more fat. You sweat because your body is just in need of thermoregulation.

The harder you work out, the more sweaty you get because you are raising your body temperature to a point that prompts you to sweat more to cool down your body.

Reference

[1] Now I Know: Sweating Like a Pig

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Florian Wüest

Qualified and experienced fitness trainer and online coach.

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Last Updated on March 30, 2021

12 Best At Home Workouts (No Equipment Needed)

12 Best At Home Workouts (No Equipment Needed)

Covid-19 has certainly made getting to the gym more difficult, but if we’re honest, it was difficult before, as well. Between tiring days at work, helping the kids with their homework, and maintaining a social life, where do you find time to squeeze in an hour or two at the gym? Sometimes, the only solution to maintaining your health and fitness rests on the best at home workout.

The good news is that it’s possible to train from home without any equipment and get fantastic results. As long as you’re pushing the body hard enough, you’re going to be fine. The bad news is that you may not know where to start.

There are a plethora of different training regimens out there, and it’s difficult to know which one is best for you, especially if you’re used to live classes or in-person workout programs.

This article will cover the 12 best at-home workouts that you can use for strength, High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), and mobility. There will be an exact breakdown of all the exercises, sets, reps, rest periods, and instructions required to stay fit, healthy, and happy while on lockdown.

The following sessions are broken down into beginner, intermediate, and advanced workouts to accommodate any experience level. They are all bodyweight exercises that can be combined into a full body workout to build strength while working out at home.

A thorough warm-up is also included to ensure that you don’t get injured. Please check each workout before you perform it to make sure that the exercises and movements don’t cause you any pain from previous or pre-existing injuries.

If you need help getting into the habit of working out at home, you can try Lifehack’s free 30-Day Resistance Band Workout Challenge.

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Read on to find the 12 best at-home workouts without equipment you can use to upgrade your strength, burn some calories, and improve your flexibility while training at home.

Warm-Up

Complete the warm-ups below for 5-6 minutes before each of the best at home workouts you’ll find below. Complete each exercise for a total of 15 seconds at a slow to moderate pace, and your body will be ready to jump into more intense exercises.

Repeat for 3-4 rounds, as this will help lubricate your joints, slowly elevate your heart rate, and get your body ready for exercise[1].

Dynamic Stretches

Complete the relevant dynamic stretches after your warm-up. For strength workouts, complete the stretches relevant to the session you’re about to partake in (e.g. upper body stretches before an upper-body workout).

For HIIT workouts, complete both the lower body and upper body dynamic stretches. For mobility workouts, you don’t need to do these.

Aim to do 15-20 reps on each side for 1 round.

Upper Body Dynamic Stretches:

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Lower Body Dynamic Stretches:

Strength Workouts

1. Upper-Body Strength Workout (Beginner)

This is one of the best at home workouts if you’re a beginner looking to build upper-body strength. Complete all exercises with 30-60 seconds rest between sets.

For exercises 2-6, use two water bottles to mimic weights. For exercise 7, you can use the couch or a chair to support yourself.

2. Abs Strength Workout (Beginner)

This bodyweight workout is great for building muscle tone in your abs. Complete all exercises with 30 seconds rest between sets, and use a yoga mat if you have one.

3. Leg Strength Workout (Beginner)

If you’re looking to add some strength to your legs, this is the best at home workout for that purpose. Complete all exercises with 30-60 seconds rest between sets. For exercises 3-4, you can use the sofa or a chair to support yourself.

4. Upper-Body Strength Workout (Advanced)

Complete all exercises with 30-60 seconds rest between sets. With advanced workouts, you have to push yourself close to your limit, or to your absolute limit (until you feel like you really can’t do more). This will dictate how many reps to do.

For exercises 6-7, use two heavy water bottles if you don’t have weights available.

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5. Abs Strength Workout (Advanced)

If you need more core support and strength, this is the best at home workout for those who are already comfortable working out. Complete all exercises with 30-60 seconds rest between sets.

With advanced workouts, you have to push yourself close to your limit, or to your absolute limit (until you feel like you really can’t do more). This will dictate how many reps to do.

6. Leg Strength Workout (Advanced)

Complete all exercises with 30-60 seconds rest between sets. With advanced workouts, you have to push yourself close to your limit, or to your absolute limit (until you feel like you really can’t do more). This will dictate how many reps to do.

For exercises 4-6, use heavy water bottles if you don’t have weights available.

7. HIIT Workout (Beginner)

This is the best at home workout for those who are new to HIIT training. Complete all exercises for 30 seconds of work with 30 seconds of rest. Complete 4 rounds.

8. HIIT Workout (Intermediate)

Complete all exercises for 35 seconds of work with 25 seconds of rest. Complete 5-6 rounds.

9. HIIT Workout (Advanced)

If you’ve already been doing HIIT training for a while, this is one of the best at home workouts to keep you going. Complete all exercises for 45 seconds of work with 15 seconds of rest. Complete 7-8 rounds.

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Mobility Workouts

10. Upper Body Mobility Workout

Hold each exercise for 15-20 seconds total, and do 2-3 sets. Slowly increase the range of each stretch until you feel tension, then hold before slowly releasing it.

This workout will help improve flexibility in your upper body.

11. Lower Body Mobility Workout

If you need more flexibility in your hips and legs, this is the best at home workout for you. Hold each exercise for 15-20 seconds total, and do 2-3 sets. Slowly increase the range of each stretch until you feel tension, then hold before slowly releasing it.

This workout will help improve flexibility in your lower body.

12. Spinal Mobility Workout

Complete each exercise for 10 reps total, and do 2-3 sets. This workout will help improve your posture, alleviate lower back pain, and increase your flexibility.

It’s highly recommended if you’re an office worker that spends most of the day sitting.

Final Thoughts

These are the 12 best at home workouts that you can use to level up your body, torch some calories, and enhance your flexibility while at home. Give these a go, and you’ll be well on your way feeling fitter, healthier, and more productive after lockdown is over!

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Featured photo credit: Scott Broome via unsplash.com

Reference

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