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Does Sweating Burn Fat? Find out the Truth Here

Does Sweating Burn Fat? Find out the Truth Here

When I was training martial arts years ago, there was a guy training while wearing a huge insulated jacket in the gym. It was 25 degrees outside. He was trying to slim down for a fight he would have 3 months from then. He was sweating like a pig (speaking about the iron ore smelting,[1] of course). In the training session, you felt sweat from this guy dropping on your face. That guy honestly thought that losing sweat means losing fat.

Does sweating burn fat? I wish I would’ve had the necessary knowledge back then, because if so, I could have told him that it doesn’t work this way.

Why we sweat

We sweat to minimize body temperature. Our body tries to be on a constant 37°C body temperature with slight fluctuations during the day. At this temperature, the enzyme activities of your body work the best.

Once your body exceeds these comfortable 37°C, it activates your sweat glands. You start to lose water along with salts, sugar and tiny amounts of waste products. You have about 2 to 4 million sweat glands in your body that cool you down.

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The amount you sweat heavily depends on your genetics. The temperature and humidity level does influence your sweat rate, but so does your gender, age and fitness level.

You sweat more in heat and humidity, but that doesn’t mean you’re burning more calories or fat. It simply means your body has to release perspiration to bring your body temperature down. People with a higher amount of body fat tend to sweat a lot more because they have a greater amount of body mass to cool down.

Sweat and body fat

Fat gets released from fat cells to provide your body with energy. Your body breaks down the fat into its parts — fatty acids and glycerol — which are then metabolized.

Fat is quite hard to metabolize, but it’s possible. Read this article to see how I’ve lost my body fat or get in contact if you’re looking for a coach. The more energy you need, the more your body pulls from your fat cells. The bodily function that causes you to use fat for energy operates independently of the one that causes you to sweat.

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Purposefully exercising in a hot or humid environment doesn’t mean you’re working harder to burn more fat. You’re simply raising your body temperature to a point that prompts you to sweat more.

When I was younger, I also thought that sweating increases the rate of body fat that you burn. If you sweat more, it simply means that you’re working harder, am I right?

But we have to realize that sitting on a beach on a 100-degree day doesn’t require a lot of energy and doesn’t use notable amounts of fat. You sweat because your body is just in need of serious thermoregulation.

On the other hand, when you work hard in sub-zero temperatures such as jogging in winter, you still burn fat even if your body doesn’t sweat as much to cool you down.

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Weight loss or just water gone?

You may notice that after a shirt-drenching workout, the number on the scale has gone down. You haven’t dropped a few pounds of fat, but you have lost a fair amount of fluids. This is also why training with a jacket can make sense for a martial artist to lose weight short-term (to fit the right weight-class), but not months ahead of the competition.

But for normal people looking to get fit, you should replace that lost weight with water or a sports drink to avoid dehydration.

If you enter a workout dehydrated, you may not sweat at all. Your body increases in temperature but is unable to cool down efficiently again. This results in a decreased ability to perform. This is also why hydration is critical to reaching your performance goals.

Consume about half a litres until you begin a workout and at least 0.3 litres every 20 minutes during the workout session. In the end, you can drink 0.5 litres again (this might also help in muscle buildup).

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Pro Tip: Weigh yourself before and after the workout and then compare the two numbers. When the scale says you’ve lost weight, drink fluids immediately. At best 0.5 litres to make up for every kilogram that you’ve lost.

Conclusion

You’ve probably heard about “Sweat is fat crying”. While I know it’s just a saying to get people stay motivated, now you know that it’s not true.

Sweating more doesn’t mean losing more fat. You sweat because your body is just in need of thermoregulation.

The harder you work out, the more sweaty you get because you are raising your body temperature to a point that prompts you to sweat more to cool down your body.

Reference

[1] Now I Know: Sweating Like a Pig

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Florian Wüest

Qualified and experienced fitness trainer and online coach.

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Published on July 12, 2019

What to Eat When Constipated? 10 Foods to Improve Your Gut Health

What to Eat When Constipated? 10 Foods to Improve Your Gut Health

There’s nothing worse than being constipated! Unfortunately, this frustrating condition is quite common in adults and children alike.

Constipation can strike out of the blue – but it’s often for very simple reasons. Diet is a major cause, particularly when you haven’t been eating enough fiber or drinking enough water.[1]

Other causes include a disruption to your normal bowel routine, such as not going to the bathroom often enough. This sort of disruption can occur with traveling or even being in a sedentary desk job. Lack of activity can have a major impact on your bowel regularity.

Certain medications can also upset your bowel movements, especially opioids, anti-inflammatories, antacids, and antihistamines.

Constipation can also be caused by gut imbalances. Candida overgrowth or SIBO can trigger a variety of digestive symptoms including constipation.[2]

If you find that you’re getting constipated frequently, don’t keep reaching for the laxatives. Think about what’s caused your bowel to slow down, and what you can do to prevent it from happening again.

The most important thing you can do is eat the right foods and watch out for your gut health! Here’s our pick of what to eat when constipated.

1. Pure Water

For some reason, the most obvious cause of constipation is also the last to be considered: hydration!

When you don’t drink enough water, your body quickly becomes dehydrated. This means any waste in your intestines will become slow and ‘stuck’ because your body can’t add enough moisture to your stools. If this is the case, your stools will be small, hard, dry and lumpy.[3]

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Try to drink at least 2 liters of clean, filtered water daily. The easiest way to do this is by carrying a drink bottle with you everywhere, so you can sip it regularly. This will help to move food and waste through your body and keep everything flowing naturally.

After all, you wouldn’t try to clean a drain without turning on the tap!

2. Fermented Dairy Products

Yogurt and kefir are two types of fermented dairy products that can be invaluable to a constipated gut. They both contain probiotics, which are a type of ‘friendly’ bacteria that helps to break down food that you eat.

Probiotics have been shown to improve digestion and elimination by supporting a healthy gastrointestinal environment and maintaining bowel regularity.

Numerous studies have shown that adding probiotics to your diet can help to reduce constipation. One study found that when patients with chronic constipation drank an unflavored probiotic yogurt every day for two weeks, their bowel transit time was significantly shortened. This specific yogurt contained Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis.[4]

3. Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are tiny black and white seeds from the plant, Salvia hispanica L. They’re rich in omega-3 fatty acids, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium.

The great thing about chia seeds is that they form a lubricating gel-like consistency when they absorb water. This gel can help to improve stool formation, keeping them moist and making them easier to pass. The omega-3 fatty acids are also renowned for their anti-inflammatory properties, which is highly beneficial to an irritated gut.

As well as their amazing lubrication effects, chia seeds are packed with soluble fiber. Soluble fiber is the type that most people find much gentler on the gut, and it’s should be top of your list of what to eat when constipated. It’s easy to add chia seeds to cereals, baked goods, smoothies and yogurt for a fiber-rich snack or meal.

4. Legumes

When you’re wondering what to eat when constipated, your best bet is fiber-rich foods. Lentils, beans and chickpeas are great for preventing and treating constipation.

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Fiber is an important macronutrient that should be included in your daily diet in order to keep your bowels healthy. It works by adding bulk to your stools, which causes waste to press against your intestines and stimulate peristalsis – the wave-like movements that push waste along to be excreted.

Research has shown that just 100 grams of cooked beans or other pulses provides around 26 percent of your recommended daily intake of fiber.[5] What’s more, these foods are packed with plenty of other nutrients such as potassium, folate, zinc, and vitamin B6, which also help support the health of your gut.

5. Broth

Broths have been a dietary staple for centuries – and for good reason. The rich mineral content of bones and other ingredients makes a broth highly nutritious and easily absorbed by the gut.

Most importantly, bone broth provides a good dose of moisture to an inflamed or dehydrated gut. This can help to soften any hard stools in your intestines and make them easier to eliminate. You’ll also be supporting your nutritional intake if your appetite has diminished, which can happen during bouts of constipation.

It’s easy to make your own bone broth from chicken bones, beef bones or other animal carcasses. Bone broth is particularly beneficial for an irritated gut because it’s rich in gelatin, which can soothe the lining and help repair damaged cells. The warmth of bone broth makes it very easy to digest and very appetizing!

6. Prune Juice and Prunes

Prunes have long been hailed as the king of ‘keeping you regular’! These dried fruits are absolutely packed with fiber, that important macronutrient that keeps waste moving through your gut.

Prunes also contain a type of sugar called sorbitol. Because sorbitol can’t be broken down by your body, it passes through your colon undigested and draws water into your gut. This helps to bulk up your stool and stimulate a bowel movement.

Studies show that sorbitol is a safe and effective remedy for constipation, and it’s often a favorite with older adults.[6] Prunes can increase the frequency of your bowel movements and improve consistency.

If you really have no idea of what to eat when constipated, a handful of prunes could be the easiest remedy in the book. Take care not to overdo the prunes though, as they can also cause some gas and bloating!

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7. Bran

Eating bran for breakfast is often associated with older folk – and it’s probably the first thing you’ll be told to eat when constipated!

Bran is a fantastic source of insoluble fiber, also known as ‘roughage’. Bran helps to push stools along the intestinal passage, allowing for better regularity.

Bran is not a grain itself, but actually the tough outer layers of the grain. It’s an integral part of whole grains, and is often eaten as a cereal.

One study showed that eating wheat bran for breakfast each day for two weeks reduced the incidence of constipation in women who previously lacked a fiber-rich diet.[7] The bran also helped to improve their bowel regularity.

If you don’t like the taste of bran, you can try adding it to smoothies or yogurt. It also adds delicious texture to baked goods.

8. Broccoli

Eating your greens was never so important as when your bowels need some stimulation. Broccoli is a good source of fiber, like other foods mentioned above. But it also contains a valuable nutrient called sulforaphane, which can help to protect the gut and improve digestion.

Research suggests that sulforaphane may even help to ward off ‘unfriendly’ gut bacteria that can upset normal digestion. One study showed that when participants ate 20g of raw broccoli sprouts every day for 4 weeks, they had fewer symptoms of constipation than those who ate alfalfa sprouts. The broccoli also seemed to improve their bowel transit time and the quality of their bowel motions.[8]

9. Green Kiwi

Also known as kiwifruit and Chinese gooseberry, the kiwi is a very helpful remedy for a sluggish bowel. One medium-sized kiwi contains around 2.5 grams of fiber, along with a variety of nutrients.

The most important benefit of kiwis for constipation is due to a protease enzyme called actinidine. Actinidine has been found to stimulate motility in the upper gastrointestinal tract, which helps to push waste along the intestines.

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Another valuable nutrient in green kiwi is a peptide called kissiper, which promotes healthy digestion and peristalsis. One study showed that when adults with constipation ate just two kiwis a day, their bowel movements increased in regularity.[9]

Kiwi is also a rich source of natural phytochemicals that can support the health of the gut. Because it’s technically a berry, you can even eat the hairy outer peel for extra roughage!

10. Pears

Like prunes and kiwi, pears are an excellent source of fiber. This fiber is known as pectin, and it’s contained in the peel of the fruit. To get the most benefit from pectin, you really have to eat the pear raw and with the skin on.

Pears also contain a number of compounds that aid digestion, such as sorbitol and fructose. Their high water content is also helpful in hydrating a sluggish bowel, providing extra moisture for hard stools.

A great way to eat pears is to add them to Bircher muesli. Simply grate the pears and add to oats, seeds and other fruit, then cover with water and refrigerate. The fiber-rich goodness and flavor of the pears will soak into the muesli overnight, creating a delicious breakfast!

So here they are, 10 everyday foods that can improve your digestion and fix your constipation.

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Featured photo credit: Toa Heftiba via unsplash.com

Reference

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