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Package Your Blog Nicely With Free Photos From Everypixel.com

Package Your Blog Nicely With Free Photos From Everypixel.com

Over 2 million blog posts go live on the internet each day, and countless articles and social media posts vie for readers’ attention.[1] If you spend enough time on the internet, it’s not hard to see that many bloggers use similar stock photos.

Stock photos can be an incredible resource for the blogger who doesn’t have much experience with photography, but choosing the wrong photo can be detrimental to traffic. A mediocre image won’t grab a reader’s attention, and it may even drive them away.

Package your blog posts so that people want to read them

Think about what triggers you to pick up an item in the store. There may be a number of companies that produce great products and support initiatives that you value. Are you drawn to the way the item looks, the stance that the company takes on important issues, or the item description?

Chances are, despite your best intentions to be a conscientious buyer, you may still be attracted to product packaging over everything else. A study by Gressingham Foods found that simply changing the design of their product packaging increased their sales by 47% without altering the product or doing additional promotion.[2]

The way items look matters to consumers, and the way you present your article is important too. The featured image on a post can draw readers in for a closer look or prompt them to keep scrolling.

For those writing on the internet, competition for readers’ time and attention is fierce. When you post an article, you’re competing against an infinite pool of content. Unless you wrap your posts up in an attractive package by using great photos, your work will disappear into the crowd.

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Save yourself time and find the perfect picture for your blog post

Whether you’re just starting your blog, or you’re an experienced blogger, you know how time-consuming it can be to find the perfect photo to feature with your article. Everypixel.com makes it easy to locate an eye-catching and interesting image. Everypixel.com is a stock image search engine that allows you to search for photos across the top 50 stock-photo platforms.

Using Everypixel.com is simple

You’ll be amazed at how easy it is to get started with everypixel.com. You don’t even have to sign up to start using it. When you arrive at the site, you’ll see a screen that looks like the one below.

    You can type keywords for the type of photo that you need into the rectangular search box.

      To the right of the search box, you’ll have the option to choose the budget for your project from the drop-down list. This will save you from having to weed through images that fall outside of your price range.

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      Imagine that you are writing an article about horseback riding, and you need a great free image to use on your blog. You’d simply type “horseback riding” into the search box and select “Free only” from the drop-down menu. Then, click the magnifying glass icon to get your results.

      When I clicked on the magnifying glass, I learned that there are many options to choose from. There are 22 pictures that you can download for free. If you had a budget for photos, you’d have 1,278 pictures at your disposal.

        If you knew more information about the type of picture that you wanted, you could narrow this search using the filters at the top.

          For example, to view images with a landscape orientation, select “horizontal” to immediately filter out pictures that don’t meet your qualifications. You can also look for vector images and graphics via the filters on the search page.

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          If you decide that you’d like to look at paid and free images, click on “Free only” and you’ll have the option to change the price range you’d like to view.

          When you find the image that you like, click on it, and you it will take you to a page that gives you all the details you’ll need to figure out if it’s the right photo for you.

            When I selected the image above, I was able to see the name of the photographer, the image’s resolution, the price, and where Everypixel found the photo. This particular image is available from Unsplash, and when I click on the area that says, “Free Download,”it takes me to the Unsplash page in a separate tab.

            When you reach the page where the image is housed, you can download it for use on your blog.

            In addition to searching with the main search bar, you can use the search options in the top right-hand corner of the main page.

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              “Free images” narrows your search to free images with a Creative Commons license that allows you to use the photos for commercial purposes. “Microstock” gives you the chance to compare prices on inexpensive stock photos so that you can stick to your budget. “Premium photos” sources higher quality images, but they’ll also be more expensive than the microstock options.

              When it comes to packaging your blog, don’t skimp on the photos

              Instead of agonizing over where to find the perfect image or being stuck with a sub-par stock photo that detracts from your readership, give Everypixel.com a try. It’s free and user-friendly.

              Use great pictures to draw readers in and build your traffic. With a site like Everypixel, it’s easier than ever.

              Reference

              More by this author

              Brian Lee

              Chief of Product Management at Lifehack

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              Last Updated on October 22, 2019

              How to Focus and Concentrate Better to Boost Productivity

              How to Focus and Concentrate Better to Boost Productivity

              We live in a world of massive distraction. No matter where you are today, there is always going to be distractions. Your colleagues talking about their latest date, notification messages popping up on your screens, and not just your mobile phone screens. And even if you try to find a quiet place, there will always be someone with a mobile device that is beeping and chirping.

              With all these distractions, it is incredibly difficult to concentrate on anything for very long. Something will distract you and that means you will find it very difficult to focus on anything.

              So how to focus and concentrate better? How to focus better and produce work that lifts us and takes us closer towards achieving our outcomes?

              1. Get Used to Turning off Your Devices

              Yes, I know this one is hard for most people. We believe our devices are so vital to our lives that the thought of turning them off makes us feel insecure. The reality is they are not so vital and the world is not going to end within the next thirty minutes.

              So turn them off. Your battery will thank you for it. More importantly though is when you are free from your mobile distraction addiction, you will begin to concentrate more on what needs to get done.

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              You do not need to do this for very long. You could set a thirty-minute time frame for being completely mobile free. Let’s say you have an important piece of work to complete by lunchtime today. Turn off your mobile device between 10 am and 11 am and see what happens.

              If you have never done this before, you will feel very uncomfortable at first. Your brain will be fighting you. It will be telling you all sorts of horror stories such as a meteorite is about to hit earth, or your boss is very angry and is trying to contact you. None of these things is true, but your brain is going to fight you. Prepare yourself for the fight.

              Over time, as you do this more frequently, you will soon begin to find your brain fights you less and less. When you do turn on your device after your period of focused work and discover that the world did not end, you have not lost an important customer and all you have are a few email newsletters, a confirmation of an online order you made earlier and a text message from your mum asking you to call about dinner this weekend, you will start to feel more comfortable turning things off.

              2. Create a Playlist in Your Favourite Music Streaming App

              Many of us listen to music using some form of music streaming service, and it is very easy to create our own playlists of songs. This means we can create playlists for specific purposes.

              Many years ago, when I was just starting to drive, there was a trend selling driving compilation tapes and CDs. The songs on these tapes and CDs were uplifting driving music songs. Songs such as C W McCall’s Convoy theme and the Allman Brothers Band’s, Jessica. They were great songs to drive to and helped to keep us awake and focused while we were driving.

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              Today, we can create playlists to help us to focus on our work. Choose non-vocal music that has a low tempo. Music from artists such as Ben Böhmer, Ilan Bluestone or Andrew Bayer has the perfect tempo.

              Whenever you want to go into deep, focused work, listen to that playlist. What happens is your brain soon associates when you listen to the playlist you created with focused work and it’s time to concentrate on what it is you want to do.

              3. Have a Place to Go to When You Need to Concentrate

              If you eat, surf online and read at your desk, you will find your desk a very distracting place to do your work. One way to get your brain to understand it is focused work time is, to use the same place each time for just focused work.

              This could be a quiet place in your office, or it could be a special coffee shop you use specifically for focused work. Again, what you are doing is associating an environment with focus.

              Just as with having a playlist to listen to when you want to concentrate, having a physical place that accomplishes the same thing will also put you in the right frame of mind to be more focused.

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              When you do find the right place to do your focused work, then only do focused work there. Never surf, never do any online shopping. Just do your work and then leave. You want to be training your brain to associate focused work with that environment and nothing else.

              If you need to make a phone call, respond to an email or message, then go outside and do it. From now on, this place is your special working place and that is all you use it for.

              Every morning, I do fifteens minutes of meditation. Each time, I sit down to do my meditation, I use the same music playlist and the same place. As soon as I put my earphones in and sit down in this place, my mind immediately knows it is meditation time and I become relaxed and focused almost immediately. I have trained my brain over a few months to associate a sound and a place with relaxed, thoughtful meditation. It works.

              4. Get up and Move

              We humans have a limited attention span. How long you can stay focused for depends on your own personal makeup. It can range from between twenty minutes to around two hours. With practice, you can stay focused for longer, but it takes time and it takes a lot of practice.

              When you do find yourself being unable to concentrate any longer, get up from where you are and move. Go for a walk, move around and get some air. Do something completely different from what you were doing when you were concentrating.

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              If you were writing a report in front of a screen, get away from your screens and look out the window and appreciate the view. Take a walk in the local park, or just walk around your office. You need to give your brain completely different stimuli.

              Your brain is like a muscle. There is only so much it can do before it fatigues. If you are doing some focused work in Photoshop and then switch to surfing the internet, you are not giving your brain any rest. You are still using many of the same parts of your brain.

              It’s like doing fifty pushups and then immediately trying to do bench presses. Although you are doing a different exercise, you are still exercising your chest. What you need to be doing to build up superior levels of concentrated focus is, in a sense, do fifty pushups and then a session of squats. Now you are exercising your chest and then your legs. Two completely different exercises.

              Do the same with your brain. Do focused visual work and then do some form of movement with a different type of work. Focused visual work followed by a discussion with a colleague about another unrelated piece of work, for example.

              The Bottom Line

              It is not difficult to train your brain to become better at concentrating and focusing, but you do need to exercise deliberate practice. You need to develop the intention to focus and be very strict with yourself.

              Set time aside in your calendar and make sure you tell your colleagues that you will be ‘off the grid’ for a couple of hours. With practice and a little time, you will soon find yourself being able to resist temptations and focus better.

              More Resources About Boosting Focus and Productivity

              Featured photo credit: Wenni Zhou via unsplash.com

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