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Four Awesome File Sharing Alternatives to Dropbox

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Four Awesome File Sharing Alternatives to Dropbox

Data is big business. Thousands of businesses and individuals around the globe generate tons of data that need to be shared, analyzed, and stored on a daily basis. As an illustration, Dropbox, one of the major players in the file-sharing arena, recorded over 500 million users in March 2016 up from 400 million in June last year.

Dropbox isn’t the only kid on the block, though. There are tens of other cloud-based file sharing applications that offer file sharing and data storage services, usually at a fraction of the price offered by Dropbox. If you are a Dropbox user feeling boxed-in and in the mood for a little exploration, check out these alternatives for everyday online file sharing.

1. JumboMail

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jumbomail

    When it comes to up-and-coming cloud based file sharing services with growth potential, JumboMail is at the top of the list. What makes JumboMail stand out from all other file sharing services is its unique download page, which has an online media. This rich media gallery lets users view all types of files (audio, images, documents) online before choosing to download them, making the service especially useful for professionals such as photographers, graphic designers, musicians, etc.

    Jumbomail allows you to send emails with attachments of up to 20 GB from a simple web interface. You also get to send 5 GB free, an improvement from the 2 GB you get with Dropbox and many other providers. Other features include password protection for file transfers, uploading entire folders, and long-term storage options.

    Besides free transfer up to 5 GB, users can purchase one-time upload codes or a subscription plan. Plans start from $12 per month for the basic package and go up to $20 per month for the business plan.

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    2. SpiderOak

    spideroak

      Remember the Dropbox security breach that resulted in millions of user accounts with no password authentication? Even after fixing the glitch, the breach ate into the trust many users had in the company. SpiderOak, Edward Snowden’s file sharing service of choice, boasts of one of the most robust encryption protocols of any cloud storage service. This service pays utmost attention to password and data encryption, ensuring privacy over end-to-end connections.

      Like Dropbox, you get 2 GB of free space when signing up and 7 GB, 1 TB, and 5 TB in the premium plans for $7, $12, and $25 respectively per month.

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      3. Box

      box

        Box is another cool cloud-based solution for sharing and sending large files. You can use Box as an online application or download it for use on your PC, Mac, iOS, Android, or Windows device. You can also integrate Box on your specific version of Microsoft Office to edit and share files without ever leaving the comfort of your Office interface. With Box, you get the very best in cross-platform synchronization.

        On the downside, Box limits file sizes on individual uploads to 250 MB. Still, Box has grown in popularity over the past few years because of its easy file management and sharing features.

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        Users get 10 GB of storage upon signing up and 100 GB for $6 per month and unlimited storage for $17 per month.

        4. BitTorrent Sync

        bittorrent

          If you thought BitTorrent was only good for torrents, think again. BitTorrent Sync is a peer-to-peer file sharing application that allows you to sync your files across multiple devices. This means your files don’t get stored on an external server, making it one of the safest alternatives to Dropbox and other cloud-based solutions. File sharing is heavily encrypted for when you need to push your files between different devices.

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          Conclusion

          Affordable web hosting plans have promoted the growth of file sharing services on the internet, with new ones popping up every so often. Privacy and information security are key considerations when looking to share your files over the cloud. Dropbox has since upgraded its security infrastructure, but the security loophole provided a glimpse into the security and privacy issues that come with cloud-based services. These Dropbox alternatives are far from perfect, but offer users options for file sharing across different platforms. If you are looking to get into the file sharing business, be sure to check out these factors to consider before choosing a web hosting company for your server needs.

          Featured photo credit: peoplecreations / Freepik via freepik.com

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          Vikas Agrawal

          Vikas is the co-founder of Infobrandz, an Infographic design agency that offers creative visual content solutions to medium to large companies.

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          Last Updated on November 25, 2021

          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

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          How to Make Private Browsing on Safari Truly Private

          There comes a time when we may be searching online and don’t want the browser to remember our footsteps. The reasons don’t always have to be what we obviously think of as the main reason; for example, sometimes, you may not want Safari to remember your passwords or prompt you to enter your password when surfing the web.

          Whatever the reason, we may think that we are totally in the clear with Private Browsing on Safari and the other browsers on a Mac. However, a quick Terminal command can bring up every website you’ve visited. How do you do this? Also, how do you clear your tracks for good? We will provide both answers and more today.

            What Does Private Browsing Do?

            When activated, Private Browsing on Safari prevents your browsing history from being kept in the history tab of the application. Along with this, it doesn’t autofill information that you have saved in the browser. In this mode, you essentially become incognito and any references of previous use is essentially hidden when you are in private mode.

            For example: if you are on Facebook or filling out a form and some information or your login is already filled in in the spaces provided, this is called autofill. It’s activated by simply clicking Safari next to the Apple symbol in the menubar and selecting Private Browsing, then clicking “OK” to the prompt.

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            The reasons behind private mode differ for each individual. While we won’t go into all of those reasons, one thing that is  important to remember is that private browsing doesn’t forget the websites you visit. As we will see later on, Macs keep a second copy of the websites you visit in either mode. If you are in frantic mode looking for a solution to this, look no further.

            The Terminal Archive

            While Safari does a good job of keeping your search history out of prying eyes in the history tab, there is a less-than-obvious way to view a full list of visited websites on Mac. This is done in Terminal; the command-line emulator that allows you to make changes to your Mac.

            Terminal is located in the Utilities folder on your Mac. Once activated, simply add the command:

            dscacheutil -cachedump -entries Host

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            Once you hit “enter”, a list of the visited sites appear. Showing only the domains, the sites appear in a format of:

            Key: h_name :(website domain)ipv4 :1

            However, there’s no need to fear—there is a way you can clear this information from Terminal with a command that’s just as simple.

            Clearing Your Tracks

            Just as simply as you were able to enter the command to view the websites, you can clear the cache that Terminal showed you with the comamnd:

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            dscacheutil -flushcache

            As the command denotes, this literally “flushes” the domains from Terminal. This does not prevent the record from continuing to be recorded for future sites, however, so if that’s an issue for you, repeat this process regularly.

            Other Browsers and Private Browsing

            Other browsers have this form of privacy mode for their service. They promise many of the same things as Safari, but they do not have the same Terminal issue due to how this command only presents websites visited on Safari (the browser Macs come shipped with).

            If you use Firefox, you’ll notice that its private mode is also known as Private Browsing. Chrome calls private mode Incognito, while Internet Explorer refers to it as InPrivate Browsing. Opera is the newest to the scene, denoting it as Private Tab. Safari is the oldest well-known browser with this feature.

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            As you can see, despite Private Browsing not being 100% private, Terminal allows for your browser to be. In what ways has Terminal helped your life or allowed you to become more productive? Let us know in the comments below.

            Featured photo credit: Benjamin Dada via unsplash.com

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