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Four Awesome File Sharing Alternatives to Dropbox

Four Awesome File Sharing Alternatives to Dropbox

Data is big business. Thousands of businesses and individuals around the globe generate tons of data that need to be shared, analyzed, and stored on a daily basis. As an illustration, Dropbox, one of the major players in the file-sharing arena, recorded over 500 million users in March 2016 up from 400 million in June last year.

Dropbox isn’t the only kid on the block, though. There are tens of other cloud-based file sharing applications that offer file sharing and data storage services, usually at a fraction of the price offered by Dropbox. If you are a Dropbox user feeling boxed-in and in the mood for a little exploration, check out these alternatives for everyday online file sharing.

1. JumboMail

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jumbomail

    When it comes to up-and-coming cloud based file sharing services with growth potential, JumboMail is at the top of the list. What makes JumboMail stand out from all other file sharing services is its unique download page, which has an online media. This rich media gallery lets users view all types of files (audio, images, documents) online before choosing to download them, making the service especially useful for professionals such as photographers, graphic designers, musicians, etc.

    Jumbomail allows you to send emails with attachments of up to 20 GB from a simple web interface. You also get to send 5 GB free, an improvement from the 2 GB you get with Dropbox and many other providers. Other features include password protection for file transfers, uploading entire folders, and long-term storage options.

    Besides free transfer up to 5 GB, users can purchase one-time upload codes or a subscription plan. Plans start from $12 per month for the basic package and go up to $20 per month for the business plan.

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    2. SpiderOak

    spideroak

      Remember the Dropbox security breach that resulted in millions of user accounts with no password authentication? Even after fixing the glitch, the breach ate into the trust many users had in the company. SpiderOak, Edward Snowden’s file sharing service of choice, boasts of one of the most robust encryption protocols of any cloud storage service. This service pays utmost attention to password and data encryption, ensuring privacy over end-to-end connections.

      Like Dropbox, you get 2 GB of free space when signing up and 7 GB, 1 TB, and 5 TB in the premium plans for $7, $12, and $25 respectively per month.

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      3. Box

      box

        Box is another cool cloud-based solution for sharing and sending large files. You can use Box as an online application or download it for use on your PC, Mac, iOS, Android, or Windows device. You can also integrate Box on your specific version of Microsoft Office to edit and share files without ever leaving the comfort of your Office interface. With Box, you get the very best in cross-platform synchronization.

        On the downside, Box limits file sizes on individual uploads to 250 MB. Still, Box has grown in popularity over the past few years because of its easy file management and sharing features.

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        Users get 10 GB of storage upon signing up and 100 GB for $6 per month and unlimited storage for $17 per month.

        4. BitTorrent Sync

        bittorrent

          If you thought BitTorrent was only good for torrents, think again. BitTorrent Sync is a peer-to-peer file sharing application that allows you to sync your files across multiple devices. This means your files don’t get stored on an external server, making it one of the safest alternatives to Dropbox and other cloud-based solutions. File sharing is heavily encrypted for when you need to push your files between different devices.

          Conclusion

          Affordable web hosting plans have promoted the growth of file sharing services on the internet, with new ones popping up every so often. Privacy and information security are key considerations when looking to share your files over the cloud. Dropbox has since upgraded its security infrastructure, but the security loophole provided a glimpse into the security and privacy issues that come with cloud-based services. These Dropbox alternatives are far from perfect, but offer users options for file sharing across different platforms. If you are looking to get into the file sharing business, be sure to check out these factors to consider before choosing a web hosting company for your server needs.

          Featured photo credit: peoplecreations / Freepik via freepik.com

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          Vikas Agrawal

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          Last Updated on February 15, 2019

          7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

          7 Tools to Help Keep Track of Goals and Habits Effectively

          Now that 2011 is well underway and most people have fallen off the bandwagon when it comes to their New Year’s resolutions (myself included), it’s a good time to step back and take an honest look at our habits and the goals that we want to achieve.

          Something that I have learned over the past few years is that if you track something, be it your eating habits, exercise, writing time, work time, etc. you become aware of the reality of the situation. This is why most diet gurus tell you to track what you eat for a week so you have an awareness of the of how you really eat before you start your diet and exercise regimen.

          Tracking daily habits and progress towards goals is another way to see reality and create a way for you clearly review what you have accomplished over a set period of time. Tracking helps motivate you too; if I can make a change in my life and do it once a day for a period of time it makes me more apt to keep doing it.

          So, if you have some goals and habits in mind that need tracked, all you need is a tracking tool. Today we’ll look at 7 different tools to help you keep track of your habits and goals.

          Joe’s Goals

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            Joe’s Goals is a web-based tool that allows users to track their habits and goals in an easy to use interface. Users can add as many goals/habits as they want and also check multiple times per day for those “extra productive days”. Something that is unique about Joe’s Goals is the way that you can keep track of negative habits such as eating out, smoking, etc. This can help you visualize the good things that you are doing as well as the negative things that you are doing in your life.

            Joe’s Goals is free with a subscription version giving you no ads and the “latest version” for $12 a year.

            Daytum

              Daytum

              is an in depth way of counting things that you do during the day and then presenting them to you in many different reports and groups. With Daytum you can add several different items to different custom categories such as work, school, home, etc. to keep track of your habits in each focus area of your life.

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              Daytum is extremely in depth and there are a ton of settings for users to tweak. There is a free version that is pretty standard, but if you want more features and unlimited items and categories you’ll need Daytum Plus which is $4 a month.

              Excel or Numbers

                If you are the spreadsheet number cruncher type and the thought of using someone else’s idea of how you should track your habits turns you off, then creating your own Excel/Numbers/Google spreadsheet is the way to go. Not only do you have pretty much limitless ways to view, enter, and manipulate your goal and habit data, but you have complete control over your stuff and can make it private.

                What’s nice about spreadsheets is you can create reports and can customize your views in any way you see fit. Also, by using Dropbox, you can keep your tracker sheets anywhere you have a connection.

                Evernote

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                  I must admit, I am an Evernote junky, mostly because this tool is so ubiquitous. There are several ways you can implement habit/goal tracking with Evernote. You won’t be able to get nifty reports and graphs and such, but you will be able to access your goal tracking anywhere your are, be it iPhone, Android, Mac, PC, or web. With Evernote you pretty much have no excuse for not entering your daily habit and goal information as it is available anywhere.

                  Evernote is free with a premium version available.

                  Access or Bento

                    If you like the idea of creating your own tracker via Excel or Numbers, you may be compelled to get even more creative with database tools like Access for Windows or Bento for Mac. These tools allow you to set up relational databases and even give you the option of setting up custom interfaces to interact with your data. Access is pretty powerful for personal database applications, and using it with other MS products, you can come up with some pretty awesome, in depth analysis and tracking of your habits and goals.

                    Bento is extremely powerful and user friendly. Also with Bento you can get the iPhone and iPad app to keep your data anywhere you go.

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                    You can check out Access and the Office Suite here and Bento here.

                    Analog Bonus: Pen and Paper

                    All these digital tools are pretty nifty and have all sorts of bells and whistles, but there are some people out there that still swear by a notebook and pen. Just like using spreadsheets or personal databases, pen and paper gives you ultimate freedom and control when it comes to your set up. It also doesn’t lock you into anyone else’s idea of just how you should track your habits.

                    Conclusion

                    I can’t necessarily recommend which tool is the best for tracking your personal habits and goals, as all of them have their quirks. What I can do however (yes, it’s a bit of a cop-out) is tell you that the tool to use is whatever works best for you. I personally keep track of my daily habits and personal goals with a combo Evernote for input and then a Google spreadsheet for long-term tracking.

                    What this all comes down to is not how or what tool you use, but finding what you are comfortable with and then getting busy with creating lasting habits and accomplishing short- and long-term goals.

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