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Killer Negotiator 101 – Framing a Killer Sales Pitch

Killer Negotiator 101 – Framing a Killer Sales Pitch

All of us are trying to be a killer negotiator every day. Whether it is talking your way into a million dollar deal or negotiating permission from your parents for a night out, a killer negotiator gets his way.

Your doors will keep opening if you have the ability to convince people. This series of posts is targeted at the techniques of being that killer negotiator. Over the last few posts, we have discussed how to master the basic rules of negotiation, knowing that everybody is a good guy, breaking the self-serving bias, saying less and listen more, and using the Benjamin Franklin effect and Foot in the Door technique to your advantage during negotiation. I have also discussed the reasons behind a NO and how to change that into a YES.

As a killer negotiator, you just bypassed the rat race, and that’s not all. People remember you. When you create your space in people’s minds, you touch their lives. Let me now introduce the next hack in the series – how to put your idea across to an audience and make them listen to it.

Make your presentation bold and distinct

Even in the most professional environment, people are primarily moved by emotions. You need to move people. Remember the concept of Divergence?

Bold and interesting statements make you prominent and draw attention.

Remember that one teacher in school who used to make you want to fall asleep in class as opposed to the one who kept you glued to his / her voice and presence? What do you think was the difference between the two?

Knowledge? Competence? Wrong!

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A killer negotiator or a public speaker knows that if you want an attentive audience, you will have to slip in ideas which will keep them glued to your voice. Give your audience thoughts to feed upon at regular intervals and they will listen to you!
You do not need to be a people pleaser to get attention. In fact, the most effective statements are those who differ from the concepts of the people around you. They do not have to believe in those statements when they hear it.

But yes, you need to believe what you are saying.

Here is an example from a holy man:

“Do you need to mug up all scriptures and Holy textbooks to be a saint?

Maybe it’s time we stopped teaching faith and start learning it. Every person who is above you in age or rank or social stature is trying to teach you what has not worked in their lives. Why do we love teaching others those things which we could not learn in own lives?

Look at a child. The kid is happy, happy with simple things. You give him an ant, and he will make a whole universe out of it and feel happy. We have given you a whole universe, yet you are making nothing out of it. People roam around in gloomy faces. Yet we try to transform that child into us. Who should be the teacher here? The one who is happy or the one who is not? The child or the adult?

When you meet a child, it isn’t time to teach. It is now time to learn!”

Whether you believe him or not is not important here. If you think like a killer negotiator, if you judge purely from the eyes of a person who is trying to persuade, you can see:

  1. He made several bold statements in that short extract.
  2. They were all held up later by strong arguments.

The listener may be taken aback by the concepts at first, but has to agree to it eventually when he listens to the rest of the explanation. The killer negotiator has to open with confident, bold statements, keeping the audience glued, and then back it up by sound arguments. He needs to believe those statements and should be ready to support them against counter arguments if necessary.

Examples from real life

While speaking to an audience on a podium, most speakers would open with something like:

“Thank you for the kind introduction. I have always wanted to speak.”

That is what everyone expects, and that’s why you should not start like that! Consider these opening lines:

“Look at the person on your left and now the person on your right. One of the three of you is going to disagree with me tonight, while the other two will agree. My aim is to get all three of you in agreement.”

Or a question:

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“Can you remember the most embarrassing thing ever happened to you?”

It is beneficial to place bold and interesting concepts at the start. People will listen to you when you tell them something they did not expect to hear. And this works like a charm in negotiation. If you sell people on what they already know, you are in for a lot of competition. Make people believe in your individuality rather than your similarity with the rest, and you can sell them anything! They will buy if you are trustworthy. Think of these opening lines:

“The car I am about to show you has a latest passive entry system, with a sliding sunroof, which you can control remotely. The features are unheard of!”

OR

“This proposal is a result of two years of effort and has already started turning heads in the industry. Pay close attention to what I am about to say to you.”

Be trustworthy, well-founded, and confident. Do not fight the shadows. Professionals usually like independent thinkers as long as they are confident and can back up what they are saying. But they can call your bluff just as fast.

If you say: “I can prove that the Sun goes around the Earth” just to sound bold, but then fall flat when it is time to prove it, you cannot expect much interest from your audience in the long run. Your statements will then become cheap gimmicks.

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Remember, you are not trying to fool anyone with cheap publicity stunts. Being a killer negotiator means that you have a firm and confident idea and the intention to create a Win-Win for both of you.

Which sales tagline appeals more to you?

“I have a smart watch with a remote operated 13 MP camera.”

OR

“Look at your watches. What would you say if I said that I could turn it into a 13MP camera which you can activate remotely with your smartphone?”

The idea is interesting and bold, and you have the interest of the room instantly. Provided that you are able to back up your statements, you will sell your watch!

Action plan

  1. Make sure your pitch for whatever you are negotiating on contains certain aspects that the person on the other side did not think about.
  2. You need to put this across boldly and briskly.
  3. The idea needs to be supported by well-formed logic, and you should be able to convince people of it.
  4. In addition to above, try answering the questions:
    • How can I find a solution for them which will be even better than they expect?’
    • My logic seems great, but how do I put it across in a way that will make them glued.
    • How can I do better than showing pie charts and graphs? How can I put across the same thing in various ways?

More by this author

Silence Can Solve Problems That Words Cannot Motivate ourselves Motivate Yourself: Three Tricks to Kick Your Own Ass 4 Steps to Learn from your Mistakes 8 Killer Negotiation Tricks Clients Don’t Want You To Know Killer Negotiator 101 – Framing a Killer Sales Pitch

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Last Updated on January 21, 2020

What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

What Is Creativity? We All Have It, and Need It

Do you think of yourself as a creative person? Do you play the drums or do watercolor paintings? Perhaps compose songs or direct plays? Can you even relate to any of these so called ‘creative’ experiences? Growing up, did you ever have that ‘artistic’ sibling or friend who excelled in drawing, playing instruments or literature? And you maybe wondered why you can’t even compose a birthday card greeting–or that drawing stick figures is the furthest you’ll ever get to drawing a family portrait. Many people have this common assumption that creativity is an inborn talent; only a special group of people are inherently creative, and everyone else just unfortunately does not have that special ability. You either have that creative flair or instinct, or you don’t. But, this is far from the truth! So what is creativity?

Can I Be Creative?

The fact is, that everyone has an innate creative ability. Despite what most people may think, creativity is a skill that everyone can learn and hone on. It’s a skill with huge leverage that allows you to generate enormous amounts of value from relatively little input. How is that so? You’ll have to start by expanding your definition of creativity. Ironically, you have to be creative and ‘think out of the box’ with the definition! Creativity at its heart, is being able to see things in a way that others cannot. It’s a skill that helps you find new perspectives to create new possibilities and solutions to different problems. So, if you encounter different challenges and problems that need solving on a regular basis, then creativity is an invaluable skill to have.Let’s say, for example, that you work in sales. Having creativity will help you to look for new ways to approach and reach out to potential customers. Or perhaps you’re a teacher. In this role you have to constantly look for new ways to deliver your message and educate your students.

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How Creativity Works

Let me break another misconception about creativity, which is that it’s only used to create completely “new” or “original” things. Again, this is far from the truth. Because nothing is ever completely new or original. Everything, including works of art, doesn’t come from nothing. Everything derives from some sort of inspiration. That means that creativity works by connecting things together in order to derive new meaning or value.From this perspective, you can see a lot of creativity in action. In technology, Apple combines traditional computers with design and aesthetics to create new ways to use digital products. In music, a musician may be inspired by various styles of music, instruments and rhythms to create an entirely new type of song. All of these examples are about connecting different ideas, finding common ground amongst the differences, and creating a completely new idea out of them.

What Really Is Creativity?

Creativity Needs an Intention

Another misconception about the creative process is that you can just be in a general “creative” state. Real creativity isn’t about coming up with “eureka!” moments for random ideas. Instead, to be truly creative, you need to have a direction. You have to ask yourself this question: “What problem am I trying to solve?” Only by knowing the answer to this question can you start flexing your creativity muscles. Often times, the idea of creativity is associated with the ‘Right’ brain, with intuition and imagination. Hence a lot of focus is placed on the ‘Right’ brain when it comes to creativity. But, to get the most out of creativity, you need to utilize both sides of your brain–Right and Left–which means using the analytical and logical part of your brain, too. This may sound surprising to you, but creativity has a lot to do with problem solving. And, problem solving inherently involves logic and analysis. So instead of throwing out the ‘Left’ brain, full creativity needs them to work in unison. For example, when you’re looking for new ideas, your ‘Left’ brain will guide you to a place of focus, which is based on your objective behind the ideas you’re searching for. The ‘Right’ brain then guides you to gather and explore based on your current focus. And when you decide to try out these new ideas, your ‘Right’ brain will give you novel solutions outside of the ones you already know. Your ‘Left’ brain then helps you evaluate and tune the solutions to work better in practice. So, logic and creativity actually work hand in hand, and not one at the expense of the other.

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Creativity Is a Skill

At the end of the day, creativity is a skill. It’s not some innate or natural born talent that some have over others. What this means is that creativity and innovation can be practiced and improved upon systematically.A skill can be learned and practiced by applying your strongest learning styles. Want to know what your learning style is? Try this test. A skill can be measured and improved through a Feedback Loop, and can be continuously upgraded over time by regular practice. Through regular practice, your creativity goes through different stages of proficiency. This means that you can become more and more creative! If you never thought that creativity was relevant to you, or that you don’t have a knack for being creative… think again! You can use creativity in any aspect of your life. In fact you should use it, as it will allow you to to break through your usual loop, get you out of your comfort zone, and inspire you to grow and try new things. Creativity will definitely give you an edge when you’re trying to solve a problem or come up with new solutions.

Start Connecting the Dots

Excited to start honing your creativity? Here at Lifehack, we’ve got a wealth of knowledge to help you get started. We understand that creativity is a matter of connecting things together in order to derive new meaning or value. So, if you want to learn how to start connecting the dots, check out these tips:

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Featured photo credit: rawpixel via unsplash.com

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