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21 Online Tools and Resources For Academic Essay Writing

21 Online Tools and Resources For Academic Essay Writing
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Everyone could use a little help now and then and, for students, when the mountain of work becomes impossible to climb, it’s probably time to seek out some assistance. Fortunately for them, students have so many resources to turn to online, from offering them help with grammar to organization and even complete essay writing services.

There are so many out there, that it can be overwhelming to try to sift through all such options. So, here’s a list of the best online resources around – keep this handy throughout the school year, for whenever you need help in any form.

  1. Essayroo

    EssayRoo

    You may want to get all your essays written on time, but sometimes it’s just not going to happen. Real life gets in the way, and you can’t commit to doing several assignments at once. This writing service can step in and help you out. Send them your assignments and they’ll write you an essay you can be proud of. They can do it, no matter how tight you deadlines are.

    1. Thesis Builder

    Thesis Builder

      Struggling to start your essay? These tools can help. There’s the Thesis Builder that helps you create and outline the ideas for your essay, or the Topic-O-Rama tool, that helps you come up with a good topic for your assignment.

      1. 3D Writer

      3D Writing

        Need a good writing tool for writing your essays? Originally designed for schools to encourage writing in hypertext, this tool could be the right one for you.

        1. RefMe: Admission Essay Writing Resources

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        RefMe Resources

          This post will give you a lot of tools if you’re struggling with your admissions essay for the university. There are essay builders, writing services, and tips all included.

          1. Essaypunch

          EssayPunch

            Feel like your essay skills aren’t up to the task, but your teachers don’t have the time to help you? This tool can step in. Use its online tutorials to build up your skills and start writing brilliant essays.

            1. BibMe

            BibMe

              Building your bibliographies and reference lists can be a real hassle. This online tool makes it a whole lot easier. When you use a book or source, use this tool to keep track of it. When you’re done, download an automatically generated list in your choice of referencing style. It’s as easy as that.

              1. The Yellow: Dissertation Writing Help and Tips

              Yellow How To - Dissertation Writing Tips

                This guide is perfect for anyone worrying about their dissertation this year. Use its advice to get started and get that dissertation written.

                1. Lifehack: Write My Essay Tips

                Lifehack_Write My Essay Tips

                  If you struggle with getting started, the advice in this article can help you. It talks about using brainstorming to get all your ideas down first, and not worrying too much about your structure during your first draft.

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                  1. Memonic

                  Memonic

                    It’s easy to find great ideas online. However, it’s much harder to find those ideas again when you need them for an essay. This tool lets you collect them all in one place, making it much easier to reference them when needed.

                    1. Thesis Generator

                    Ashford University Thesis Generator

                      Building your essay is easier said than done. This tool will give you an outline and guidance on writing it with very little input from you. All you have to do is answer a few questions with short statements, and you’ll get a full outline for your essay.

                      1. HuffingtonPost: Write My Essay Business Model Review

                      HuffingtonPost Essay Review

                        With an increasing number of students turning to writing services to help them get their essays done, it’s interesting to see things from a different perspective – from that of the professional essay writer.

                        1. Hemingway Editor

                        Hemingway

                          This tool is great for improving your proofreading and grammar skills. Paste your written work in and it will highlight any errors it finds. These can include too long sentences, too many adverbs, or words that have better alternatives. It even highlights different errors in different colours, making it even easier to see where you need to improve.

                          1. Back to School: Tips and Tools 

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                          Peterson's Tips

                            Starting your new life as a college student is both exciting and terrifying, all at the same time. This guide helps you get prepared to head out and begin your first year of college, providing you with lots of practical tips, as well as lots of writing tools for you to try out.

                            1. Guide to Writing a Basic Essay

                            Guide to Writing a Basic Essay

                              This is the ultimate essay writing guide. Look through their database to find help on everything from outlining to proofreading your essay.

                              1. HuffingtonPost: 8 MBA Writing Mistakes You Should Be Aware Of

                              HuffingtonPost_8 MBA Essay Writing Mistakes

                                Applying for an MBA can be stressful, but this guide makes it easier. Follow their rules for writing admissions, essays, and you’ll get that MBA seat easily.

                                1. Times of Israel: Essay Writing Resources for College Admissions

                                The Times of Israel Essay Writing Resources

                                  This guide collects together resources that you can use if you’re writing your college admissions essay. If you’re stuck, this is the best place to go.

                                  1. Essay Writing Checklist

                                  Essay Writing Checklist

                                    Do you never know how to proofread? This tool is for you. It walks you through the process, making sure you don’t miss anything.

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                                    1. Paper Writing Help: Essential Editing Tips for Students

                                    Stanford_Paper Editing and Proofreading Help

                                      Proofreading is a process, but it doesn’t have to be a lengthy one. This guide tells you exactly how to proofread effectively, saving time when you’re close to the deadline.

                                      1. Readability Score

                                      Readability Score

                                        You may have a lot of ideas that you want to get down on paper, but if no one can understand them then what’s the point? This tool will tell you just how easy it is to follow your writing. Paste it in, and it will score your writing against several grading scales. When it’s done, you’ll have the average reading age needed to understand your work.

                                        1. RatedWriting

                                        ratedwriting

                                          Don’t know where to start? Visit RatedWriting website and get a wide range of writing advice and service. The company hires professional writers and tutors who regularly update the website with new reviews to help students succeed in college.

                                          1. 6 Editing and Proofreading Tools for Essay Writer

                                          Admitsee

                                            This blog points out that it’s hard to get proofreading right if you’re the only one who’s proofreading your work. It lists several helpful tools that can help you get it right the first time before you hand that essay in.

                                            Try these tools out this term, and see just how much your essay writing will improve. Online tools are great for helping students write great essays, so take advantage of them. You’ll be glad you did when you start getting those improved grades.

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                                            Featured photo credit: StockSnap via pixabay.com

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                                            1 7 Effective Ways To Motivate Employees in 2021 2 How a Project Management Mindset Boosts Your Productivity 3 5 Values of an Effective Leader 4 How to Motivate People Around You and Inspire Them 5 The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

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                                            Last Updated on July 21, 2021

                                            The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)

                                            The Importance of Reminders (And How to Make a Reminder Work)
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                                            No matter how well you set up your todo list and calendar, you aren’t going to get things done unless you have a reliable way of reminding yourself to actually do them.

                                            Anyone who’s spent an hour writing up the perfect grocery list only to realize at the store that they forgot to bring the list understands the importance of reminders.

                                            Reminders of some sort or another are what turn a collection of paper goods or web services into what David Allen calls a “trusted system.”[1]

                                            A lot of people resist getting better organized. No matter what kind of chaotic mess, their lives are on a day-to-day basis because they know themselves well enough to know that there’s after all that work they’ll probably forget to take their lists with them when it matters most.

                                            Fortunately, there are ways to make sure we remember to check our lists — and to remember to do the things we need to do, whether they’re on a list or not.

                                            In most cases, we need a lot of pushing at first, for example by making a reminder, but eventually we build up enough momentum that doing what needs doing becomes a habit — not an exception.

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                                            From Creating Reminders to Building Habits

                                            A habit is any act we engage in automatically without thinking about it.

                                            For example, when you brush your teeth, you don’t have to think about every single step from start to finish; once you stagger up to the sink, habit takes over (and, really, habit got you to the sink in the first place) and you find yourself putting toothpaste on your toothbrush, putting the toothbrush in your mouth (and never your ear!), spitting, rinsing, and so on without any conscious effort at all.

                                            This is a good thing because if you’re anything like me, you’re not even capable of conscious thought when you’re brushing your teeth.

                                            The good news is you already have a whole set of productivity habits you’ve built up over the course of your life. The bad news is, a lot of them aren’t very good habits.

                                            That quick game Frogger to “loosen you up” before you get working, that always ends up being 6 hours of Frogger –– that’s a habit. And as you know, habits like that can be hard to break — which is one of the reasons why habits are so important in the first place.

                                            Once you’ve replaced an unproductive habit with a more productive one, the new habit will be just as hard to break as the old one was. Getting there, though, can be a chore!

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                                            The old saw about anything you do for 21 days becoming a habit has been pretty much discredited, but there is a kernel of truth there — anything you do long enough becomes an ingrained behavior, a habit. Some people pick up habits quickly, others over a longer time span, but eventually, the behaviors become automatic.

                                            Building productive habits, then, is a matter of repeating a desired behavior over a long enough period of time that you start doing it without thinking.

                                            But how do you remember to do that? And what about the things that don’t need to be habits — the one-off events, like taking your paycheck stubs to your mortgage banker or making a particular phone call?

                                            The trick to reminding yourself often enough for something to become a habit, or just that one time that you need to do something, is to interrupt yourself in some way in a way that triggers the desired behavior.

                                            The Wonderful Thing About Triggers — Reminders

                                            A trigger is anything that you put “in your way” to remind you to do something. The best triggers are related in some way to the behavior you want to produce.

                                            For instance, if you want to remember to take something to work that you wouldn’t normally take, you might place it in front of the door so you have to pick it up to get out of your house.

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                                            But anything that catches your attention and reminds you to do something can be a trigger. An alarm clock or kitchen timer is a perfect example — when the bell rings, you know to wake up or take the quiche out of the oven. (Hopefully you remember which trigger goes with which behavior!)

                                            If you want to instill a habit, the thing to do is to place a trigger in your path to remind you to do whatever it is you’re trying to make into a habit — and keep it there until you realize that you’ve already done the thing it’s supposed to remind you of.

                                            For instance, a post-it saying “count your calories” placed on the refrigerator door (or maybe on your favorite sugary snack itself)  can help you remember that you’re supposed to be cutting back — until one day you realize that you don’t need to be reminded anymore.

                                            These triggers all require a lot of forethought, though — you have to remember that you need to remember something in the first place.

                                            For a lot of tasks, the best reminder is one that’s completely automated — you set it up and then forget about it, trusting the trigger to pop up when you need it.

                                            How to Make a Reminder Works for You

                                            Computers and ubiquity of mobile Internet-connected devices make it possible to set up automatic triggers for just about anything.

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                                            Desktop software like Outlook will pop up reminders on your desktop screen, and most online services go an extra step and send reminders via email or SMS text message — just the thing to keep you on track. Sandy, for example, just does automatic reminders.

                                            Automated reminders can help you build habits — but it can also help you remember things that are too important to be trusted even to habit. Diabetics who need to take their insulin, HIV patients whose medication must be taken at an exact time in a precise order, phone calls that have to be made exactly on time, and other crucial events require triggers even when the habit is already in place.

                                            My advice is to set reminders for just about everything — have them sent to your mobile phone in some way (either through a built-in calendar or an online service that sends updates) so you never have to think about it — and never have to worry about forgetting.

                                            Your weekly review is a good time to enter new reminders for the coming weeks or months. I simply don’t want to think about what I’m supposed to be doing; I want to be reminded so I can think just about actually doing it.

                                            I tend to use my calendar for reminders, mostly, though I do like Sandy quite a bit.

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                                            Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

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                                            Reference

                                            [1] Getting Things Done: Trusted System

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