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How to Become the One That Everybody Looks Forward to Hearing Your Ideas

How to Become the One That Everybody Looks Forward to Hearing Your Ideas

Brainstorming is a matter of throwing out ideas and hoping they stick. You don’t have to evaluate the ideas before presenting them, but rather allow them to flow like a stream of consciousness until you come up with something that works as a single solution. But sometimes we can only generate a few ideas, even after a long period of time. Other times, we are full of possible solutions, but it turns out none of them are actually effective. This is why it’s vital to understand how brainstorming works so we can do it successfully.

Individual Brainstorming vs. Group Brainstorming: The Winner Is…

Most people assume brainstorming in a group is the best way to come up with numerous ideas. Some companies even require group brainstorming sessions among their employees. The more opinions you have, the more likely you are to find the right solution. Right? Not necessarily. Studies[1] have found that individual brainstorming is more effective than group brainstorming:

The empirical evidence clearly indicates that subjects brainstorming in small groups produce fewer ideas than the same number of subjects brainstorming individually…The role of social inhibition receives particular attention also in terms of suggestions for research.

This means the lack of success when it comes to group collaboration is largely due to the fear of sounding silly voicing ideas in a group; We censor our thoughts and only share the ones we think worth mentioning. In many cases, there tends to be a dominant voice in a group brainstorm who limits the potential by setting criteria. This can immediately hinder the group’s creativity, as it causes everyone to overthink and doubt themselves.

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Diffuse Mode vs. Focused Mode: Pick the Right Tool at the Right Time

Though brainstorming is all about abstract ideas, there are ways to organize those thoughts as they come to you. One of these strategies is to use Focused or Diffuse thinking, depending on the scenario. Focused thinking is exactly what it sound like – focusing. This is easier to do in a solo brainstorming session, as there are automatically less distractions. Diffused thinking is all about distractions, making it more ideal for a group collaboration.

Consider a flashlight. You can have a concentrated beam of light that only illuminates a small area very brightly or you can have a less concentrated beam that illuminates a much broader area with a dimmer light[2].

Focused thought allows your brain to analyze specific information and only work with what you allow yourself to use. Diffuse thinking multitasks with the presented information and doesn’t worry about getting too deep with any of the possible solutions. In keeping with the flashlight analogy, remember: Both flashlights will take you out of the darkness, but which one you use is solely dependent on whether you want a broad view of your path, or a narrow route.

5 Ways to Make Brainstorming More Effective

Whether working alone or in a group, there are steps to take in order to achieve success in brainstorming:

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Have a clear objective before you start brainstorming

Many people have the misconception that no boundaries should be set for brainstorming, but that’s false; even if you are happy to generate tons of ideas, they may end up being useless if they’re not helpful in fixing the problem.

Let’s say you are working on an annual fundraiser that seems to have declined in community participation recently. The objective would be to find out why the numbers are declining, not how to generate excitement about the event once more. Though both elements are important, you can’t come up with ideas about revamping the fundraising event until you determine the cause of disinterest.

Give yourself a time limit

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The shorter the better. Sit down with a pen and paper or a tape recorder if you prefer to say your ideas aloud. Keep an eye on the clock or the timer and begin to list off ideas. Allow them to flow out and don’t worry about analyzing them yet. Keep listing ideas that come to you until your time is up.

Be specific with the number of ideas you want to generate

Before you begin brainstorming, decide on a realistic number of ideas you want to come up with. This doesn’t mean all of the ideas have to be useful in the end, only that they exist[3].

Don’t duplicate your thoughts

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If you’re coming up with many similar points, you’re only deceiving yourself when it comes to your success. Using the fundraising example from point one, let’s say you come up with the following: People are no longer coming because they don’t like the event. The event is boring, so people don’t have any interest in coming. These are only two versions of the same thought. Always keep in mind that quality and quantity are equally important in brainstorming.

Imagine that you are someone else

How would they think? Does this mindset present solutions you wouldn’t have otherwise come up with? For instance, if your best friend is very creative and approaches things in ways you would typically shy away from, put yourself in their head space. What kind of right-brained ideas would they come up with as an explanation for a decline in fundraiser attendance? Once you’ve created a list, you can revisit it in your own mindset and narrow the focus.

Looking Ahead

Whether brainstorming on your own or in a group, if you take the steps outlined in this article, you set yourself up for success, not frustration. Some of you reading this may think, “but I don’t really have to brainstorm at work. I feel like we all collaborate pretty well.” If that’s true, that’s awesome! But consider being aware of your daily life and the problems you are sometimes faced with. Do you ever run through a list of possible solutions? If so, you’re brainstorming without thinking about it. Don’t be afraid to incorporate the tips you learned by reading this. Just because it’s your life and not your company doesn’t make problem-solving any less important.

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Heather Poole

Heather shares about everyday lifestyle tips on Lifehack.

How To Find Your Personal Values For Living a Fulfilling Life The 7 Types of Learners: What Kind of Learner Am I? What If All the Choices You Make Every Day Aren’t What You Need Most? What To Eat (And Not To Eat) When You Are Suffering From Inflammation! Yes Life Can Be Boring Sometimes. But There’re Some Tricks to Make It More Interesting

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Last Updated on June 3, 2020

How to Write SMART Goals (With SMART Goals Templates)

How to Write SMART Goals (With SMART Goals Templates)

Everyone needs a goal. Whether it’s in a business context or for personal development, having goals help you strive towards something you want to accomplish. It prevents you from wandering around aimlessly without a purpose.

But there are good ways to write goals and there are bad ways. If you want to ensure you’re doing the former, keep reading to find out how a SMART goals template can help you with it.

The following video is a summary of how you can write SMART goals effectively:

What Are SMART Goals?

SMART Goals

refer to a way of writing down goals that follow a specific criteria. The earliest known use of the term was by George T. Doran in the November 1981 issue of Management Review, however, it is often associated with Peter Drucker’s management by objectives concept.[1]

SMART is an acronym that stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. There are other variations where certain letters stand for other things such as “achievable” instead of attainable, and “realistic” instead of relevant.

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What separates a SMART goal from a non-SMART goal is that, while a non-SMART goal can be vague and ill-defined, a SMART goal is actionable and can get you results. It sets you up for success and gives you a clear focus to work towards.

And with SMART goals comes a SMART goals template. So, how do you write according to this template?

How to Write Smart Goals Using a SMART Goals Template

For every idea or desire to come to fruition, it needs a plan in place to make it happen. And to get started on a plan, you need to set a goal for it.

The beauty of writing goals according to a SMART goals template is that it can be applied to your personal or professional life.

If it’s your job to establish goals for your team, then you know you have a lot of responsibility weighing on your shoulders. The outcome of whether or not your team accomplishes what’s expected of them can be hugely dependant on the goals you set for them. So, naturally, you want to get it right.

On a personal level, setting goals for yourself is easy, but actually following through with them is the tricky part. According to a study by Mark Murphy about goal setting, participants who vividly described their goals were 1.2 to 1.4 times more likely to successfully achieve their goals.[2] Which goes to show that if you’re clear about your goals, you can have a higher chance of actually accomplishing them.

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Adhering to a SMART goals template can help you with writing clear goals. So, without further ado, here’s how to write SMART goals with a SMART goals template:

Specific

First and foremost, your goal has to be specific. Be as clear and concise as possible because whether it’s your team or yourself, whoever has to carry out the objective needs to be able to determine exactly what it is they are required to do.

To ensure your goal is as specific as it can be, consider the Ws:

  • Who = who is involved in executing this goal?
  • What = what exactly do I want to accomplish?
  • Where = if there’s a fixed location, where will it happen?
  • When = when should it be done by? (more on deadline under “time-bound”)
  • Why = why do I want to achieve this?

Measurable

The only way to know whether or not your goal was successful is to ensure it is measurable. Adding numbers to a goal can help you or your team weigh up whether or not expectations were met and the outcome was triumphant.

For example, “Go to the gym twice a week for the next six months” is a stronger goal to strive for than simply, “Go to the gym more often”.

Setting milestone throughout your process can also help you to reassess progress as you go along.

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Attainable

The next important thing to keep in mind when using a SMART goals template is to ensure your goal is attainable. It’s great to have big dreams but you want your goals to be within the realms of possibility, so that you have a higher chance of actually accomplishing them.

But that doesn’t mean your goal shouldn’t be challenging. You want your goal to be achievable while at the same time test your skills.

Relevant

For obvious reasons, your goal has to be relevant. It has to align with business objectives or with your personal aspirations or else, what’s the point of doing it?

A SMART goal needs to be applicable and important to you, your team, or your overall business agenda. It needs to be able to steer you forward and motivate you to achieve it, which it can if it holds purpose to something you believe in.

Time-Bound

The last factor of the SMART goals template is time-bound (also known as “timely”). Your goal needs a deadline, because without one, it’s less likely to be accomplished.

A deadline provides a sense of urgency that can motivate you or your team to strive towards the end. The amount of time you allocate should be realistic. Don’t give yourself—or your team—only one week if it takes three weeks to actually complete it. You want to set a challenge but you don’t want to risk over stress or burn out.

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Benefits of Using a SMART Goals Template

Writing your goals following a SMART goals template provides you with a clearer focus. It communicates what the goal needs to achieve without any fuss.

With a clear aim, it can give you a better idea of what success is supposed to look like. It also makes it easier to monitor progress, so you’re aware whether or not you’re on the right path.

It can also make it easier to identify bottlenecks or missed targets while you’re delivering the goal. This gives you enough time to rectify any problems so you can get back on track.

The Bottom Line

Writing goals is seemingly not a difficult thing to do. However, if you want it to be as effective as it can be, then there’s more to it than meets the eye.

By following a SMART goals template, you can establish a more concrete foundation of goal setting. It will ensure your goal is specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time-bound—attributes that cover the necessities of an effectively written goal.

More Tips About Goals Setting

Featured photo credit: Estée Janssens via unsplash.com

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