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Write My Essay – The Best Advice To Write A College Paper

Write My Essay – The Best Advice To Write A College Paper

When writing an essay for college or university, you might be staring at a blank piece of paper, wondering how on earth you’re going to get what is brewing inside your head, down into words. That blinking cursor on your laptop may be driving you mad, but luckily help is at hand.

Writing consultant, Carol Wise from Boom Essays writing service is here to share her help and tips with you, to allow you to master that top mark, and create the perfect paper.

Always brainstorm first

brainstorm essay writing

    Carol certainly advocates emptying your brain of ideas before you start the writing process. The start is always the hardest part of the essay, and brainstorming will allow you to think more outside the box than if you are trying to write all your ideas down as you go. For instance, if you are writing and you keep having new ideas pop into your brain, you’re going to go off on a tangent and forget something important, empty your ideas out and first and sort them into some sort of ‘yes’ or ‘no’ pile, before compiling an outline plan.

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    Let it all flow

    let your essay flow

      Your first draft is always going to be a tad bit messy, and Carol says that the first attempt should be your biggest flow. Write your essay as you think, let it all come out onto the screen or paper, and then organize it later. This is a little like the brainstorming process, because it empties your brain, and allows you to sort it all into something resembling order.

      An essay is made up of three important parts

      essay parts

        What does Carol say about this? Well, you should have an introduction, a main body of your essay, and a summary conclusion at the end. Your introduction should be a paragraph long, and should introduce the subject you’re going to talk about; the body is the longest part, and is your main argument or ideas, and plenty of examples to back up what you are saying; the conclusion should summarize everything and bring it to a close, again a paragraph should do it.

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        Always answer the question

        ask question

          Carol states that one of the biggest no nos is not answering the essay question you were given. You could talk forever about a subject, and it could be a seriously high quality chat, but if you don’t answer the question, you’re going to fail. Keep referring back to the brief, and ask yourself if you are still on the right lines; if not, steer it back to the main question and keep referring to it in your writing.

          Take a break

          take a break from writing

            Once you have finished your first draft, leave it for a few hours and have a break. Carol advocates breaks in the creative process, because it allows your brain to refresh itself; who knows, when you return you might have thought about a totally new angle which will breathe fresh life into your custom essay. A walk outside or an hour chatting with a friend about something different should be enough to refocus your mind.

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            Try and find a creative niche somewhere

            creative writing

              A boring essay is not going to stand out, Carol says, and instead you need to try and find an angle which is creative. Examples given throughout your paper are a good way to do this, or writing in a different way, e.g. conversational, if you are allowed to do so within the brief. Basically you need to think outside the box slightly, and this will make your essay stand out among the countless others which are basically full of fact or fiction.

              Check, check, and double check!

              edit, proofread and check essay

                Spelling and grammar errors are one of the biggest problems with essay writing, and probably the one area which will drop your mark down completely needlessly. Carol recommends checking at least twice, once with the spellcheck on your computer, and then again with your own eyes, to pull out any potential problems, before rectifying them quick time.

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                Feedback is everything

                feedback

                  Once you have completed your essay, pass it onto a trust friend, family member, teacher, or essay writer, and ask them to look at it and give you feedback. Take any comments they make on the chin, and take it as constructive criticism, Carol says. This is the tool to push your essay towards a much better mark – don’t be too precious about it!

                  If you can pull these tips into your essay writing process, you will not only stand a much better chance at receiving top mark on this occasion, but you will have harnessed valuable advice for future submissions.

                  Good luck!

                  Featured photo credit: leandrodecarvalhophoto via pixabay.com

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                  Last Updated on May 22, 2019

                  The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

                  The Pomodoro Technique: Is It Right for You to Boost Productivity?

                  If you spend any time at all researching life hacks, you’ve probably heard of the famous Pomodoro Technique.

                  Created in the 1980s by Francesco Cirillo, the Pomodoro Technique is one of the more popular time management life hacks used today. But this method isn’t for everyone, and for every person who is a passionate adherent of the system, there is another person who is critical of the results.

                  Is the Pomodoro Technique right for you? It’s a matter of personal preference. But if you are curious about the benefits of using the technique, this article will break down the basic information you will need to decide if this technique is worth trying out.

                  What is the Pomodoro Technique?

                  The Pomodoro Technique is a time management philosophy that aims to provide the user with maximum focus and creative freshness, thereby allowing them to complete projects faster with less mental fatigue.

                  The process is simple:

                  For every project throughout the day, you budget your time into short increments and take breaks periodically.

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                  You work for 25 minutes, then take break for five minutes.

                  Each 25-minute work period is called a “pomodoro”, named after the Italian word for tomato. Francesco Cirillo used a kitchen timer shaped like a tomato as his personal timer, and thus the method’s name.

                  After four “pomodoros” have passed, (100 minutes of work time with 15 minutes of break time) you then take a 15-20 minute break.

                  Every time you finish a pomodoro, you mark your progress with an “X”, and note the number of times you had the impulse to procrastinate or switch gears to work on another task for each 25-minute chunk of time.

                  How the Pomodoro Technique boosts your productivity

                  Frequent breaks keep your mind fresh and focused. According to the official Pomodoro website, the system is easy to use and you will see results very quickly:

                  “You will probably begin to notice a difference in your work or study process within a day or two. True mastery of the technique takes from seven to twenty days of constant use.”

                  If you have a large and varied to-do list, using the Pomodoro Technique can help you crank through projects faster by forcing you to adhere to strict timing.

                  Watching the timer wind down can spur you to wrap up your current task more quickly, and spreading a task over two or three pomodoros can keep you from getting frustrated.

                  The constant timing of your activities makes you more accountable for your tasks and minimizes the time you spend procrastinating.

                  You’ll grow to “respect the tomato”, and that can help you to better handle your workload.

                  Successful people who love it

                  Steven Sande of The Unofficial Apple Weblog is a fan of the system, and has compiled a great list of Apple-compatible Pomodoro tools.

                  Before he started using the technique, he said,

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                  “Sometimes I couldn’t figure out how to organize a single day in my calendar, simply because I would jump around to all sorts of projects and never get even one of them accomplished.”

                  Another proponent of the Pomodoro Technique is Sue Shellenbarger of the Wall Street Journal. Shellenbarger tried out this system along with several other similar methods for time management, and said,

                  “It eased my anxiety over the passing of time and also made me more efficient; refreshed by breaks, for example, I halved the total time required to fact-check a column.”

                  Any cons for the Pomodoro Technique?

                  Despite the number of Pomodoro-heads out there, the system isn’t without its critics. Colin T. Miller, a Yahoo! employee and blogger, tried using the Pomodoro Technique and had some issues:[1]

                  “Pomodoros are an all or nothing affair. Either you work for 25 minutes straight to mark your X or you don’t complete a pomodoro. Since marking that X is the measurable sign of progress, you start to shy away from engaging in an activity if it won’t result in an X. For instance…meetings get in the way of pomodoros. Say I have a meeting set for 4:30pm. It is currently 4:10pm, meaning I only have 20 minutes between now and the meeting…In these instances I tend to not start a pomodoro because I won’t have enough time to complete it anyway.”

                  Another critic is Mario Fusco, who argues that the Pomodoro Technique is…well…sort of ridiculous:[2]

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                  “Aren’t we really able to keep ourselves concentrated without a timer ticketing on our desk?… Have you ever seen a civil engineer using a timer to keep his concentration while working on his projects?… I think that, like any other serious professional, I can stay concentrated on what I am doing for hours… Bring back your timer to your kitchen and start working in a more professional and effective way.”

                  Conclusion

                  One of the best things about the Pomodoro Technique is that it’s free. Yeah, you can fork over some bills to get a tomato-shaped timer if you want… or you can use any timer program on your computer or phone. So even if you try it and hate it, you haven’t lost any cash.

                  The process isn’t ideal for every person, or in any line of work. But if you need a systematic way to tackle your daily to-do list, the Pomodoro Technique may fit your needs.

                  If you want to learn more about the Pomodoro Technique, check out this article: How to Make the Pomodoro Technique More Productive

                  Reference

                  [1] Aspirations of a Software Developer: A Month of the Pomodoro Technique
                  [2] InfoQ: A Critique of the Pomodoro Technique

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