Advertising
Advertising

8 Fruit & Vegetable Skins You Should Keep Out Of The Compost!

8 Fruit & Vegetable Skins You Should Keep Out Of The Compost!

You might want to think twice before you throw away the skins of your fruit and vegetables. Science now tells us that it is the most nutritious part of the foods you eat. Here are the health benefits found in 8 every day fruit and vegetable skins. as well as how you can add them to your daily diet.

1. Outer Cabbage Leaves

    The darker the green on a cabbage leaf, the more vitamin and mineral content it contains. With green cabbage, the outer leaves are the ones that are usually removed for waste, which is a real shame.

    These outer leaves may be tougher, but the secret is to finely cut them and add them to stir fries, casseroles or soups, allowing a little extra cooking time to soften them. They can also be added to green smoothies, or in a coleslaw where you can create a visually stunning salad with vibrant greens and carrots.

    2. Radishes

    Advertising

    12864278413_6ae748b222_o

      Most of the time the leafy greens from radish plants get thrown away or composted, but they’re edible and delicious. Just one radish leaf will give a great peppery taste to the most basic of salads.

      3. Potato skin

      15134783975_c616e6e0bd_o

        When compared as a whole, the potato with the skin has more nutrients than the rest of the potato. Leaving the skin on a potato while baking or boiling also helps retain the nutrients of the potato and stops the nutrients from leaching out.

        Potatoes contain 2g of fibre, the majority of which is found in the skin. The skin of a potato also contains B vitamin, vitamin C, iron, calcium and potassium. Just be sure to wash the potato thoroughly and remove any obvious blemishes before cooking.

        4. Broccoli leaves and stem

        Advertising

        355728360_3e1625eb13_o

          Broccoli comes from the cruciferous family and is excellent for maintaining a healthy liver. The florets and stems of broccoli are very similar in their nutrient content. The content of most B vitamins, minerals, and fibre are very similar in the two parts of the plant. The largest difference involves beta-carotene, which is about seven times more plentiful in the florets than in the stems! The darker green florets also contain more chlorophyll than the lighter green stalks. Since the stalks take a little longer to steam than the florets, it is best to begin cooking them first and after about two minutes add the florets to the steamer.

          The leaves of the broccoli plant are also excellent sources of nutrients. They are actually higher in beta-carotene than the florets and can contain phytonutrients that aren’t found in the stems and florets. Rip up a small part of the leaf and add to a green salad.

          Whenever I cook broccoli for the family, I do not throw away the broccoli stalks. Instead, I peel and chop them to use in a stir fry, soup or casserole, or grill them on skewers with chicken, pineapple and bell peppers. You can add some extra nutrition into your family’s meals by grating the broccoli stalks, then adding them to spaghetti sauce. Adding a broccoli stem or leaf into a green smoothie or juice is also highly recommended.

          5. Kiwi fruit

          6286398180_a9ea7c1a81_o

            The kiwifruit skin is completely edible and makes this nutrient-dense fruit even more nutritious. Just by eating the skin can triple your daily fibre intake compared to merely eating the flesh. By not peeling the skin, you preserve much of the vitamin C content as well.

            Advertising

            Just like any fresh fruit or vegetable, you should always wash the skin before eating and enjoy your kiwifruit, skin and all. Leaving the skin on sliced kiwifruit makes it much easier for snacking, as the skin holds each slice together. People all over the world have been eating this fruit skin for centuries without any negative side effects.

            6. Pineapple core

            5467020647_11c1f312eb_o

              Okay, so this point is not technically a skin that I am discussing. But it is important to add this piece of information of not coring the pineapple, as the core contains the highest concentration of bromelian. Keep in mind due to the blood thinning properties of bromelian, you should also avoid taking aspirin (or any other medicinal blood thinners) if consuming pineapple on a daily basis.

              On a side note here, the bromelian content is very minimal in canned pineapple. In most canned pineapple the core is removed before the canning process and even if it isn’t, the heating process for canning actually destroys the bromelian content.

              7. Beetroot Leaves

                Besides supplying good amounts of protein, phosphorus, and zinc, beetroot greens are also a great source of fibre. Beetroot leaves, also known as beet greens, is packed with antioxidants, vitamin B6, magnesium, potassium, copper, and manganese, as well as being low in fat and cholesterol.

                Advertising

                The vitamin K content in these greens also assist with blood clotting properties, helps ward off osteoporosis and, works with calcium to boost bone strength. Beetroot greens have a higher iron content than spinach, and a higher nutritional value than the beetroot itself. The vitamin A content in beetroot greens assists the body in strengthening the immune system and stimulates the production of antibodies and white blood cells.

                8. Citrus peel

                7435919384_adaa595cc6_k

                  There are over 60 different types of flavonoids in citrus fruits such as lemons and many of these flavonoids have their highest concentrations within the peel. Naringin is a flavonoid found in lemon peel (though not the fruit). Naringin is a powerful antioxidant. It is important to note that naringin can also increase the effects of certain drugs; you should consult with your doctor if you regularly consume these foods. Hesperidin, another flavonoid, is found in the white inner layer of lemons, and has been shown to inhibit bone loss and decrease serum and liver lipids in postmenopausal mice.

                  Gram for gram, citrus peels also contain higher levels of many minerals and vitamins such as vitamin C and dietary fibre than the fruit. For example, 1 tablespoon of lemon peel contains double the amount of vitamin C and triple the amount of fibre than 1 wedge of lemon without the peel. The best way to utilise the skin of a lemon is to juice it or add a wedge of lemon, skin and all, to your favourite green smoothie or smoothie bowl. You can also zest or grate the peel to infuse the essence of citrus into any dish that you feel would benefit from the citrus taste and aroma.

                  More by this author

                  5 Hormones That May Be Responsible for Weight Gain 10 Magic Nutrients for Building a Strong Immune System Attention Coconut Cream Lovers: 15 Dishes You’ll Love 10 Healthy and Gorgeous Smoothie Bowls That Give You a Morning Headstart 8 Fruit & Vegetable Skins You Should Keep Out Of The Compost!

                  Trending in Food and Drink

                  1 The Ultimate Coffee Guide For Energy Boost 2 Latest Scientific Research Shows That Coffee Is Actually Good For Your Brain 3 Science Says Coffee Naps Are Better Than Coffee Or Nap Alone 4 Your Body on Caffeine Addiction: 70 Cups of Coffee in 7 Days 5 17 Power Pressure Cooker Recipes for Rushed Weeknight Meals

                  Read Next

                  Advertising
                  Advertising
                  Advertising

                  Last Updated on January 11, 2021

                  11 Hidden Benefits of Using Oil Diffusers

                  11 Hidden Benefits of Using Oil Diffusers

                  Affordable, relaxing, and healthy, oil diffusers are gaining popularity with people everywhere due to their extensive benefits. Oil diffusers work through the simple process of oil diffusion, which uses heat to turn oil into a vapor that is then spread around a living space. Diffused oil can have several relaxation and health-related benefits, including safe scent-dispersion, mosquito and mold defense, stress relief, and more!

                  Read on for 11 hidden benefits of using oil diffusers.

                  1. Safe Scents That Make Sense

                  Unlike candles or air fresheners, oil diffusers release cleansing molecules into your air that work to purify it, not overload it with unhealthy chemicals. Electronic diffusers also do not pose the fire risk that candles do. Plus, they contain the added feature of interchangeability, which means you change oil types for different scents and health benefits.

                  Advertising

                  2. Stress Relief

                  Several lab studies have confirmed that diffusing essential oils like lavender have been shown to reduce stress and help relieve anxiety in medical patients. Preliminary studies have also shown that oil diffusers can help alleviate symptoms of depression.

                  3. Improved Sleep

                  Diffused oil has relaxing properties that can help people of all ages fall asleep quicker and sleep more soundly. Electronic diffusers not only have the option to mix and match different oil blends (Try a lavender, Bulgarian rose, and Roman chamomile blend to help with insomnia), they also run at a gentle hum that helps relax an agitated mind. Many also come with an auto shut-off feature to help conserve oils once you have fallen asleep.

                  4. Appetite Control

                  Much like gum, oil diffusers can help stimulate the senses in a way that works to curb appetite. New research has shown that diffused peppermint oil can help curb appetite by inducing a satiety response within the body. Diffused peppermint oil has also been shown to increase energy.

                  Advertising

                  5. Bacteria and Mold Killing

                  When essential oils are diffused in the air, they break down free radicals that contribute to the growth of harmful bacteria. Eucalyptus, thyme, and tea tree oils are especially good for this purpose. Diffused oil is also highly effective when it comes to combating fungal yeast threats, as the oil help makes the air inhospitable for yeasts such as mold. Pine and red thyme essential oils are best for combating mold.

                  6. Decongestion and Mucus Control

                  Ever tried Vick’s Vapo-Rub? Its decongesting powers come from active ingredients made from the eucalyptus tree. In principle, oil diffusers work the same way as Vapo-Rub, except they diffuse their decongesting vapor all around the room, not just on your chest or neck. Oil diffusers have been known to cure pneumonia in lab mice.

                  7. Mosquito Repellant

                  Nobody likes mosquitoes — but when the trade-off means using repellants full of DEET, a toxic chemical that can be especially harmful to children, mosquito control can often seem like a lose-lose. However, scientists have shown that oil diffusers can be used as a safe and highly effective mosquito repellant. Studies have shown that a diffused oil mixture containing clove essential oil and lemongrass essential oil repelled one type of Zika-carrying mosquito, the Aedes aegypti mosquito, at a rate of 100%.

                  Advertising

                  8. Pain Relief

                  While applying oils directly to areas of your body may be the most effective way to alleviate pain, diffusing essential oils can also be an effective means of pain relief. When we inhale healthy essential oils, they enter our blood stream and can help internally relieve persistent pain from headaches, overworked muscles, and sore joints.

                  9. The New Anti-Viral

                  Research into the anti-viral effects of oil diffusion is now just gaining steam. A recent study showed that star anise essential oil was proven in medical experiments to destroy the herpes simplex virus in contained areas at a rate of 99%. Another study showed the popular DoTerra oil blend OnGuard to have highly-effective influenza-combating powers.

                  10. Improved Cognitive Function

                  Diffusing essential oils has also been shown to improve cognitive function. Many essential oils have adaptogenic qualities, which can work twofold in soothing us when we’re stressed, and giving our bodies a pick-me-up when we’re feeling down or sluggish. By working to level out an imbalanced mood, diffused oils also help us to focus. There are also several essential oils which have been shown to help balance the body’s hormones. With prolonged use, these oils can work to repair the underlying causes responsible for hindering cognitive function.

                  Advertising

                  11. Money Saving

                  With ten clear benefits of oil diffusers already outlined, there is one more that should now be obvious: using an oil diffuser will help you to save money. As an anti-viral, bug repelling, and stress-relief solution rolled into one safe product, an oil diffuser used with the proper oils will save you money on products you might otherwise be buying to help cure those pesky headaches or get your kids to fall asleep on time. If you’re wondering just how affordable oil diffusers can be, check the buyer’s guide to the best oil diffusers — you’ll be sure to find one that fits your budget!

                  Featured photo credit: Jopeel Quimpo via unsplash.com

                  Read Next