Advertising

7 Reasons To Go Kayaking Today

Advertising
7 Reasons To Go Kayaking Today

Very few activities offer outdoor enthusiasts a wide range of experience as kayaking. Whether you are in for heart-stopping roller coaster exhilaration or the peace and serenity of getting lost in the moment, kayaking can never let you down.

There are various types of kayaking. Flatwater kayaking can include from a lazy day at the lake to day long kayaking on the ocean. Whitewater kayaking basically involves navigating in swift moving rivers.

Advertising

People from all walks of life have become fascinated about how kayaking can prove to be an exhilarating experience. Those who consider themselves as kayakers are as varied as their boats and the waters they paddle in. In addition to being easy, enjoyable, and fun, kayaking is also an excellent low-impact workout.

Here are more reasons why you should take up kayaking!

Advertising

1. A Chance To Get Close To Nature

Kayaking definitely offers you the ability to get closer to and interact with nature than a lot of other outdoor activities. You will be able to travel to sights and enjoy sceneries that only a very small percentage of people are able to access. If you are into recreational kayaking, you must have noticed by now the tranquility and that comes with it, away from noises, dust, smoke, and congestion of the urban setting.

2. Kayak To Be With Friends

During a fun day out, kayakers share a strong bond with fellow enthusiasts which builds camaraderie and enhances friendship. Whether you want to hang out, have some fun, or go out on a competitive streak, kayaking is for you. Personally, this qualifies as one of those very few outdoor activities you can engage with your partner to create long lasting, sensational, and adventurers’ memories.

Advertising

3. Adventure and Relaxation

Whether you are kayaking off a 30 foot waterfall, exploring crevices of banks of some hidden shoreline, or sneaking up on wildlife in a secluded island, you can never miss an opportunity for adventure during any kayaking event. There are very few things that offer the relaxation and serenity that come with watching the sunset over an ocean while seated in your kayak.

4. Kayaking Relieves Stress

Stress relief is probably one of the most cited benefits of kayaking, and it’s not difficult to imagine. Research by Leanna Fines and Dough Nicholas on self-concept, satisfaction, and attitude benefits of recreational kayaking suggests that there are in fact more emotional and mental benefits to paddling beyond stress relief.

Advertising

The study was based on people who had encountered brain injury and were not able to participate in outdoor activities. When exposed to a kayaking program for 12 weeks, the emotional and physical benefits were staggering. They recorded over 27% increase inpsychological, social, physiological and educational scores.

5. Great For Aerobic Exercise

Kayaking is a great exercise indeed. Very few other outdoor activities offer this level of aerobic exercise coupled with upper body conditioning. According to scientific researches, kayaking for one hour can burn up to 500 calories. So, if you kayak for 4 hours, you basically lose 2000 calories; Weight watchers favorite! Yet another good plus and fun way to shed off some pounds. Pick up the pace today and race your heart rate to enjoy the cardio benefits without having to hit the gym.

Advertising

6. It’s Adaptable and Versatile

You can use a kayak in almost any body of water; ocean, lake, dam, pool (well, large pool). Again, there are different uses within all those waters ranging from marathon racing to water polo or leisure paddling. First timers and learners are advised to keep of deep and violent waters, and always accompany a friend who has a good grip on kayaking or knows their way around water. Make sure you also take a handheld GPS for fishing if you want to get your bait and never lose your favorite spot.

7. Tone Your Tummy

Any fitness trainer will tell you that abs is the hardest group of muscles to work out. It is so difficult to get nice-looking and firm abs given that the area around the stomach is usually packed with hard-to-eliminate fats. You can however get that six-pack within a very short amount of time with kayaking. The rotational paddling movements you make during kayaking give your core muscles quite some good demanding exercise. This will also give your biceps and triceps an excellent workout, leaving you with bulky and firm looking arms.

More by this author

Nabin Paudyal

Co-Founder, Siplikan Media Group

20 Countries You Should Visit At Least Once In Your Lifetime 20 Reasons Why Barcelona Is An Amazing Place To Live 5 Of The Most Spectacular Hotels Around The World 10 Reasons You Should Visit Rome Once In Your Lifetime 10 Reasons Why Traveling Is The Best Form of Education

Trending in Hobby

1 Science Says Knitting Makes Humans Warmer And Happier, Mentally 2 18 Things You Need To Know Before You Get Your First Tattoo 3 17 Free Websites That Will Improve the Quality of Your Life Today 4 Streaming or Downloading: Which Is the Best Use of Your Mobile Data? 5 7 Fun Things To Do When You’re Home Alone

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on January 27, 2022

5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Advertising
5 Reasons Why Food is the Best Way to Understand a Culture

Food plays an integral role in our lives and rightfully so: the food we eat is intricately intertwined with our culture. You can learn a lot about a particular culture by exploring their food. In fact, it may be difficult to fully define a culture without a nod to their cuisine.

“Tell me what you eat, and I’ll tell you who you are.” – Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1825).

Don’t believe me? Here’s why food is the best way to understand a culture:

Food is a universal necessity.

It doesn’t matter where in the world you’re from – you have to eat. And your societal culture most likely evolved from that very need, the need to eat. Once they ventured beyond hunting and gathering, many early civilizations organized themselves in ways that facilitated food distribution and production. That also meant that the animals, land and resources you were near dictated not only what you’d consume, but how you’d prepare and cook it. The establishment of the spice trade and the merchant silk road are two example of the great lengths many took to obtain desirable ingredients.

Advertising

Food preservation techniques are unique to climates and lifestyle.

Ever wonder why the process to preserve meat is so different around the world? It has to do with local resources, needs, and climates. In Morocco, Khlea is a dish composed of dried beef preserved in spices and then packed in animal fat. When preserved correctly, it’s still good for two years when stored at room temperature. That makes a lot of sense in Morocco, where the country historically has had a strong nomadic population, desert landscape, and extremely warm, dry temperatures.

Staples of a local cuisines illustrate historical eating patterns.

Some societies have cuisines that are entirely based on meat, and others are almost entirely plant-based. Some have seasonal variety and their cuisines change accordingly during different parts of the year. India’s cuisine is extremely varied from region to region, with meat and wheat heavy dishes in the far north, to spectacular fish delicacies in the east, to rice-based vegetarian diets in the south, and many more variations in between.

Advertising

The western part of India is home to a group of strict vegetarians: they not only avoid flesh and eggs, but even certain strong aromatics like garlic, or root vegetables like carrots and potatoes. Dishes like Papri Chat, featuring vegetable based chutneys mixed with yoghurt, herbs and spices are popular.

Components of popular dishes can reveal cultural secrets.

This is probably the most intriguing part of studying a specific cuisine. Certain regions of the world have certain ingredients easily available to them. Most people know that common foods such as corn, tomatoes, chili peppers, and chocolate are native to the Americas, or “New World”. Many of today’s chefs consider themselves to be extremely modern when fusing cuisines, but cultural lines blended long ago when it comes to purity of ingredients.

Advertising

Black pepper originated in Asia but became, and still remains, a critical part of European cuisine. The Belgians are some of the finest chocolatiers, despite it not being native to the old world. And perhaps one of the most interesting result from the blending of two cuisines is Chicken Tikka Masala; it resembles an Indian Mughali dish, but was actually invented by the British!

Food tourism – it’s a whole new way to travel.

Some people have taken the intergation of food and culture to a new level. No trip they take is complete with out a well-researched meal plan, that dictates not only the time of year for their visit, but also how they will experience a new culture.

Advertising

So, a food tourist won’t just focus on having a pint at Oktoberfest, but will be interested in learning the German beer making process, and possibly how they can make their own fresh brew. Food tourists visit many of the popular mainstays for traditional tourism, like New York City, San Francisco, London, or Paris, but many locations that they frequent, such as Armenia or Laos, may be off the beaten path for most travelers. And since their interest in food is more than meal deep, they have the chance to learn local preparation techniques that can shed insight into a whole other aspect of a particular region’s culture.

Featured photo credit: Young Shih via unsplash.com

Advertising

Read Next