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Neuroscientist Says When You Travel, Your Brain Reacts In A Special Way

Neuroscientist Says When You Travel, Your Brain Reacts In A Special Way

Everyone loves a change of scene or an exciting trip away, but did you know that spending time in a new location will literally change your brain for the better?

If you’ve ever suspected that traveling doesn’t just further your personal growth but actually makes you healthier, you’ll be pleased to know that you have research on your side.

Your Brain and Traveling

According to University of Pittsburgh neuroscientist Paul Nussbaum, traveling can stimulate your brain and encourage the growth of new connections within cerebral matter.[1] The key concept is the link between new experiences and the generation of dendrites within the brain.

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Dendrites are branch-like extensions that grow from brain neurons. Their role is to facilitate the transmission of information between different regions of the brain. In brief, the greater your number of functioning dendrites, the better your brain will perform. This aids in maintaining cognitive functions such as memory and attention.

Nussbaum points out that when you travel to a new location, your brain is forced to make sense of new stimuli. This triggers the production of new dendrites. In Nussbaum’s words, your brain “literally begins to look like a jungle.”

Your trip doesn’t even have to be relaxing or go according to plan for you to enjoy the benefits. Although we would all prefer that our flights be on time, and our rental or hotel to be perfect, a degree of stress and anxiety can play a positive role in promoting dendrite growth.

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This is because when we come up against an obstacle or problem, our brains are forced to process the situation at hand and devise a solution. This promotes dendritic growth, and also gives our general problem-solving abilities a boost.

Nussbaum also explains that if you cannot travel, you can still employ these basic principles to stimulate your brain. Think about how you can take steps to break free from your usual routine and encourage your brain to view life from a new perspective. Consider changing the time you wake up in the morning, the route you take to work, where you eat lunch, and the kind of reading material you usually use to pass the time on your commute.

If you are serious about stimulating your brain, take up a new hobby, or even go back to school and get a new qualification. Even if it doesn’t lead to a change of career or promotion at work, the challenge it will present to your brain make it time and money well spent.

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Moreover, classes and community-based hobbies give you the chance to meet other people. Not only will this increase your motivation, but it will also allow you to rethink your existing attitudes and opinions. When we take time to talk with other people, they often surprise us with their own unique outlook on the world. Forcing your brain to make sense of someone else’s thoughts can be stimulating.

If you don’t have the time or resources to invest in a new pastime or class, consider at least making time on a regular basis to try some puzzles. Wordsearches, crosswords, logic puzzles, and number games are all excellent ways of giving your brain a workout.

So if you haven’t already booked your annual vacation yet, consider making it a priority. If you can’t get away for even a few days, at least shake up your daily routine or take up a new hobby.

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Not only will you have a bank of positive memories from which to draw on more mundane days, but your brain will thank you.

Reference

[1] Chicago Tribune: Travel as a health regimen

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Jay Hill

Freelance Writer

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Last Updated on June 13, 2019

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

5 Fixes For Common Sleep Issues All Couples Deal With

Sleeping next to your partner can be a satisfying experience and is typically seen as the mark of a stable, healthy home life. However, many more people struggle to share a bed with their partner than typically let on. Sleeping beside someone can decrease your sleep quality which negatively affects your life. Maybe you are light sleepers and you wake each other up throughout the night. Maybe one has a loud snoring habit that’s keeping the other awake. Maybe one is always crawling into bed in the early hours of the morning while the other likes to go to bed at 10 p.m.

You don’t have to feel ashamed of finding it difficult to sleep with your partner and you also don’t have to give up entirely on it. Common problems can be addressed with simple solutions such as an additional pillow. Here are five fixes for common sleep issues that couples deal with.

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1. Use a bigger mattress to sleep through movement

It can be difficult to sleep through your partner’s tossing and turning all night, particularly if they have to get in and out of bed. Waking up multiple times in one night can leave you frustrated and exhausted. The solution may be a switch to a bigger mattress or a mattress that minimizes movement.

Look for a mattress that allows enough space so that your partner can move around without impacting you or consider a mattress made for two sleepers like the Sleep Number bed.[1] This bed allows each person to choose their own firmness level. It also minimizes any disturbances their partner might feel. A foam mattress like the kind featured in advertisements where someone jumps on a bed with an unspilled glass of wine will help minimize the impact of your partner’s movements.[2]

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2. Communicate about scheduling conflicts

If one of you is a night owl and the other an early riser, bedtime can become a source of conflict. It’s hard for a light sleeper to be jostled by their partner coming to bed four hours after them. Talk to your partner about negotiating some compromises. If you’re finding it difficult to agree on a bedtime, negotiate with your partner. Don’t come to bed before or after a certain time, giving the early bird a chance to fully fall asleep before the other comes in. Consider giving the night owl an eye mask to allow them to stay in bed while their partner gets up to start the day.

3. Don’t bring your technology to bed

If one partner likes bringing devices to bed and the other partner doesn’t, there’s very little compromise to be found. Science is pretty unanimous on the fact that screens can cause harm to a healthy sleeper. Both partners should agree on a time to keep technology out of the bedroom or turn screens off. This will prevent both partners from having their sleep interrupted and can help you power down after a long day.

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4. White noise and changing positions can silence snoring

A snoring partner can be one of the most difficult things to sleep through. Snoring tends to be position-specific so many doctors recommend switching positions to stop the snoring. Rather than sleeping on your back doctors recommend turning onto your side. Changing positions can cut down on noise and breathing difficulties for any snorer. Using a white noise fan, or sound machine can also help soften the impact of loud snoring and keep both partners undisturbed.

5. Use two blankets if one’s a blanket hog

If you’ve got a blanket hog in your bed don’t fight it, get another blanket. This solution fixes any issues between two partners and their comforter. There’s no rule that you have to sleep under the same blanket. Separate covers can also cut down on tossing and turning making it a multi-useful adaptation.

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Rather than giving up entirely on sharing a bed with your partner, try one of these techniques to improve your sleeping habits. Sleeping in separate beds can be a normal part of a healthy home life, but compromise can go a long way toward creating harmony in a shared bed.

Featured photo credit: Becca Tapert via unsplash.com

Reference

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