Advertising
Advertising

Why Overthinkers Are Probably Creative Problem-Solvers

Why Overthinkers Are Probably Creative Problem-Solvers

Neurotic overthinkers, often have negative thoughts and emotions. The mere mention of the word conjures up a host of negative feelings and emotions: anxiety, worry, stress, moodiness and overthinking. However, psychologists have discovered a hidden gem. Neurotic overthinkers are highly creative. In fact, if you’re one, you may even be a creative genius.

But why are neurotic overthinkers more creative?

To fully understand this, we need to find the link between creativity and neuroticism…

According to an Opinion Paper published in Trends and Cognitive Sciences, a new theory is presented which establishes a link between creativity and neurotics. The part of your brain responsible for self-generated thoughts – for example, introspection and over analysis- is more active in neurotics, yielding both positive and negative traits. The positive traits are increased creativity and the negative traits are anxiety, depression, obsession and even misery, to name but a few.

Advertising

In speaking to Huffington Post, Dr. Adam Perkins, one of the Authors of the study re-affirms this: “Neuroticism has costs, but it also has benefits. Highly neurotic people will suffer a lot of anxiety and depression over their lifespan, but their deep-thinking, brooding tendencies can also give rise to greater creative potential.”

The link then lies in overthinking.

Overthinking as the driving force behind neuroticism

Overthinking is regarded as the driving force behind neuroticism. But not just any type of overthinking. Overthinkers are adept at negative thinking because certain parts of their prefrontal cortex (a brain area governing self-generating thoughts) are highly active. Consequently, they’re hypersensitive towards threat and danger even when it doesn’t exist. They will often go into overdrive to solve the problem. Whilst this can lead to great unhappiness for neurotic overthinkers it’s closely linked to an imagination that over reacts and generates threats. It can also push them to become highly creative problem solvers.

Advertising

Perkins goes on to say: “If neurotic people tend to think more about problems due to having a lot of threat-related, self-generated thoughts — which explains their tendency to feel unhappy — it seems likely they will have a better chance to create solutions to those problems, compared to low scorers on neuroticism who look on the bright side of life all the time.”

Great neurotic thinkers

And this probably explains why the likes of Van Gogh, Woody Allen, and Isaac Newton were highly creative and yet highly neurotic overthinkers. They dwelled on problems longer than the average person. They dug deep, they analyzed (and over-analyzed) and they obsessed.

Isaac Newton, for example, was prone to worrying, over thinking and dwelling on scientific problems: “I keep the subject constantly before me, and wait till the first dawnings open slowly, by little and little, into a full and clear light”,

Advertising

That being said if he hadn’t, many of his creative breakthroughs wouldn’t have come to fruition. This would’ve had a profound impact learning in schools and the world as a whole.

Helping people make sense of their own experiences

The researchers hope the theory stimulates new research and provides a single framework to tie together both the emotional and creative aspects of neuroticism.They do however acknowledge further research is required:

“We’re still a long way off from fully explaining neuroticism, and we’re not offering all of the answers, but we hope that our new theory will help people make sense of their own experiences, and show that although being highly neurotic is by definition unpleasant, it also has creative benefits” Perkins in Eureka Alert

Advertising

So the next time you feel down, depressed, anxious or moody, remember you have an amazingly unique ability as a neurotic over thinker – you’re highly adept at creative problem solving. Some may even say, you’re a creative genius.

More by this author

When You Can Stop Yourself From Multitasking, Your Brain Will Start To Change How Silence Affects Our Brains in A Good Way, Science Explains 5 Things That Will Happen When You Wake Up Two Hours Earlier For A Month Why Overthinkers Are Probably Creative Problem-Solvers Expert Says We’ll Be Much More Productive If We Start Work Until After 10am

Trending in Communication

110 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks 2When You Start to Enjoy Being Single, These 12 Things Will Happen 321 Best Tips On Making A Long Distance Relationship Work 4The Skill That Most People Don’t Have: Active Listening 518 Signs You’ve Found Your Soulmate

Read Next

Advertising
Advertising

Last Updated on August 16, 2018

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

10 Ways To Step Out Of Your Comfort Zone And Enjoy Taking Risks

The ability to take risks by stepping outside your comfort zone is the primary way by which we grow. But we are often afraid to take that first step.

In truth, comfort zones are not really about comfort, they are about fear. Break the chains of fear to get outside. Once you do, you will learn to enjoy the process of taking risks and growing in the process.

Here are 10 ways to help you step out of your comfort zone and get closer to success:

1. Become aware of what’s outside of your comfort zone

What are the things that you believe are worth doing but are afraid of doing yourself because of the potential for disappointment or failure?

Draw a circle and write those things down outside the circle. This process will not only allow you to clearly identify your discomforts, but your comforts. Write identified comforts inside the circle.

2. Become clear about what you are aiming to overcome

Take the list of discomforts and go deeper. Remember, the primary emotion you are trying to overcome is fear.

Advertising

How does this fear apply uniquely to each situation? Be very specific.

Are you afraid of walking up to people and introducing yourself in social situations? Why? Is it because you are insecure about the sound of your voice? Are you insecure about your looks?

Or, are you afraid of being ignored?

3. Get comfortable with discomfort

One way to get outside of your comfort zone is to literally expand it. Make it a goal to avoid running away from discomfort.

Let’s stay with the theme of meeting people in social settings. If you start feeling a little panicked when talking to someone you’ve just met, try to stay with it a little longer than you normally would before retreating to comfort. If you stay long enough and practice often enough, it will start to become less uncomfortable.

4. See failure as a teacher

Many of us are so afraid of failure that we would rather do nothing than take a shot at our dreams.

Advertising

Begin to treat failure as a teacher. What did you learn from the experience? How can you take that lesson to your next adventure to increase your chance of success?

Many highly successful people failed plenty of times before they succeeded. Here’re some examples:

10 Famous Failures to Success Stories That Will Inspire You to Carry On

5. Take baby steps

Don’t try to jump outside your comfort zone, you will likely become overwhelmed and jump right back in.

Take small steps toward the fear you are trying to overcome. If you want to do public speaking, start by taking every opportunity to speak to small groups of people. You can even practice with family and friends.

Take a look at this article on how you can start taking baby steps:

Advertising

The Number One Secret to Life Success: Baby Steps

6. Hang out with risk takers

There is no substitute for this step. If you want to become better at something, you must start hanging out with the people who are doing what you want to do and start emulating them. (Here’re 8 Reasons Why Risk Takers Are More Likely To Be Successful).

Almost inevitably, their influence will start have an effect on your behavior.

7. Be honest with yourself when you are trying to make excuses

Don’t say “Oh, I just don’t have the time for this right now.” Instead, be honest and say “I am afraid to do this.”

Don’t make excuses, just be honest. You will be in a better place to confront what is truly bothering you and increase your chance of moving forward.

8. Identify how stepping out will benefit you

What will the ability to engage in public speaking do for your personal and professional growth? Keep these potential benefits in mind as motivations to push through fear.

Advertising

9. Don’t take yourself too seriously

Learn to laugh at yourself when you make mistakes. Risk taking will inevitably involve failure and setbacks that will sometimes make you look foolish to others. Be happy to roll with the punches when others poke fun.

If you aren’t convinced yet, check out these 6 Reasons Not to Take Life So Seriously.

10. Focus on the fun

Enjoy the process of stepping outside your safe boundaries. Enjoy the fun of discovering things about yourself that you may not have been aware of previously.

Featured photo credit: Unsplash via unsplash.com

Read Next